PDA

View Full Version : Share bits of culture from your background that you like



SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
03-28-2017, 06:34 PM
It will be interesting to see different cultures in Africa that is associated with you. I think that is another part of your heritage as well as ancestry. Share bits of your culture you like and feel connected to and like.

Food: Chapati and coconut kidney beans are my favourite food.

14746

Swahili Halwa.

14750

Matobosha or hot sweet porridge are my fave i normally have it on special.

14747

Games: Swahili stick dance which are hosted in weddings, guess who wins the battles aye ;)

14748

Music: Swahili taarab from Zanzibar.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nD17AMG1ieg

Traditional clothing:

14749

jaderose22
03-30-2017, 07:21 PM
I'm american not African and I like that staple foods are usually meat based.

lightofurlife
06-20-2017, 09:14 AM
I'm Black American, Lousiana Creole

And I love our Language (Creole) Our accents when we speak English

Our Food
Gumbo, Jambalya, Beignets, Oxtail Soup, Crawfish


Our Religions:
Catholicism
Voodoo and Hoodoo which we derived from our African homelands

Our Music:
Zydeco, Jazz, Swamp Pop, Blues, Negroe Spirituals

Awale
08-02-2017, 10:06 PM
The Sheikh is not a nationalist by any stretch of the imagination but he does carry around a sense of connection to his ethnic and regional roots as can be seen via the flags on his profile. At any rate, I've always quite liked the way various Early-Modern Horn Africans and East-Central Northern-Sudanese folk dressed:

Somalis (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B2ARnUeK-Y8WdDlGa2d5RHpHWms?usp=sharing)
Bejas (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B2ARnUeK-Y8WX2FYcklpMTIzTzg?usp=sharing)
Habeshas (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B2ARnUeK-Y8WQlBreUtOVjVpWG8?usp=sharing)

I grew up eating and love Beer (http://xawaash.com/?p=1826#sthash.71090SLi.dpbs), Canjeero (http://xawaash.com/?p=1548), Laxoox (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahoh), Bariis (http://xawaash.com/?p=471) and Basto (http://xawaash.com/?p=8505#sthash.3f4gNugP.dpbs) as much as the next guy. The sheikh also finds himself listening to some 70s-to-80s Somali music (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=somali+music+from+the+80s) as well as some current stuff from across the region from time to time. I listen to random Oromo stuff (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUw3fUmaC28) quite often, actually. I've never quite gotten into Somali poetry, though. My mother often recites or essentially sings some for me (including ones composed for me :lol:) from time to time but that's about it.

drobbah
08-02-2017, 10:17 PM
It will be interesting to see different cultures in Africa that is associated with you. I think that is another part of your heritage as well as ancestry. Share bits of your culture you like and feel connected to and like.

Food: Chapati and coconut kidney beans are my favourite food.



In Somaliland (self declared Republic in NW Somalia) we also eat Chapati perhaps it was learned in Aden or brought by Indian merchants/soldiers for the British Empire.In Somali we call it sabaayad
http://www.mysomalifood.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/Sabaayad-1.jpg

Awale
08-02-2017, 10:20 PM
In Somaliland (self declared Republic in NW Somalia) we also eat Chapati perhaps it was brought with the English who brought Indians with them ofcourse.Somali we call it sabaayad

Somalis in other regions eat it too. I ate it a lot as a kid (still do from time to time). My mother had this funny habit of cutting it up into little pieces, throwing said pieces into a bowl and then mixing in sugar and tea. Simply put, it was sublime.

drobbah
08-02-2017, 10:29 PM
Somalis in other regions eat it too. I ate it a lot as a kid (still do from time to time). My mother had this funny habit of cutting it up into little pieces, throwing said pieces into a bowl and then mixing in sugar and tea. Simply put, it was sublime.
I had no clue other Somalis eat sabaayad as I grew up with fellow Northerns (including Galbeed Somalis).I remember growing up I had a Reer konfuur neighbour who used to bring us fresh sugary malawax every Saturday morning.Southerners also have a unique food called Cambuulo but I have never personally tried it

blackflash16
08-02-2017, 10:34 PM
I had no clue other Somalis eat sabaayad as I grew up with fellow Northerns (including Galbeed Somalis).I remember growing up I had a Reer konfuur neighbour who used to bring us fresh sugary malawax every Saturday morning.Southerners also have a unique food called Cambuulo but I have never personally tried it

Interesting. My parents are from Taleh and Las Anod and they both call it Kamis, I always assumed sabaayad was the southern name for it.

drobbah
08-02-2017, 10:38 PM
Interesting. My parents are from Taleh and Las Anod and they both call it Kamis, I always assumed sabaayad was the southern name for it.
Even in the North the dialects vary between east (Sool iyo Sanaag) and west (Awdal iyo gobolka Gabiley) regardless of clan affialiation.So maybe that's why we have different words for this perhaps?

Awale
08-02-2017, 10:41 PM
Southerners also have a unique food called Cambuulo but I have never personally tried it

Hahah, that's consumed in my house sometimes cos there are two young women from the south living with us (work for my mother at her shop). It's usually popular among the Hawiye clan members there from what my mother says. It's apparently unbearable or tasteless without lots of sugar. The amount I see them pouring onto it in order to make it "tastey" looks like a real recipe for diabeetus. :lol:


I had no clue other Somalis eat sabaayad as I grew up with fellow Northerns (including Galbeed Somalis).

Ah, I see. The Somalis here in the UAE are from everywhere. Djibouti, Galbeed, Bari, all over the south and even Ethiopia. But regarding sabaayad; interestingly, and I never knew this prior, it apparently has close ties to "Paratha (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paratha)" from the subcontinent if this site (http://www.somalikitchen.com/about-the-somali-kitchen/) is to be believed. The south somewhat had more contact with the subcontinent from what I gather so I wouldn't be shocked if it even originated there in our region but who knows. They definitely have it in the south, though, as far as I know.

Targum
08-02-2017, 10:49 PM
Hahah, that's consumed in my house sometimes cos there are two young women from the south living with us (work for my mother at her shop). It's usually popular among the Hawiye clan members there from what my mother says. It's apparently unbearable or tasteless without lots of sugar. The amount I see them pouring onto it in order to make it "tastey" looks like a real recipe for diabeetus. :lol:



Ah, I see. The Somalis here in the UAE are from everywhere. Djibouti, Galbeed, Bari, all over the south and even Ethiopia. But regarding sabaayad; interestingly, and I never knew this prior, it apparently has close ties to "Paratha (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paratha)" from the subcontinent if this site (http://www.somalikitchen.com/about-the-somali-kitchen/) is to be believed. The south somewhat had more contact with the subcontinent from what I gather so I wouldn't be shocked if it even originated there in our region but who knows. They definitely have it in the south, though, as far as I know.

Yemenite Jews in Israel (my wife and her family included) make for Rosh HaShanah (New Year) a bread called "sabayyeh" which is a slightly oily dough baked with "qetzahh" (black cumin) seeds generously in the dough. Does that sound like the Somali Sabaayad at all? It would be eaten with "maraq Teimani" (Yemenite soup) and something called "hhilbeh" (fenugreek chutney spiced with zehhug, hot pepper)

Targum
08-02-2017, 10:52 PM
Even in the North the dialects vary between east (Sool iyo Sanaag) and west (Awdal iyo gobolka Gabiley) regardless of clan affialiation.So maybe that's why we have different words for this perhaps?

now I am really in twilight zone: Malawahh is Yemenite Jewish oily flaky layered dough now eaten by all Israelis and American Jews-frozen malawahh dough found at any Walmart in Jewish areas-that's also Somali lol?

Awale
08-03-2017, 12:17 AM
which is a slightly oily dough baked with "qetzahh" (black cumin) seeds generously in the dough. Does that sound like the Somali Sabaayad at all?

I have no clue how it's made, to be honest. I've had relatives explain the ingredients for it and Canjeero to me several times but I always forgot. Found this, though:

http://xawaash.com/?p=2250
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/246109/sabaayad-somali-flatbread/


now I am really in twilight zone

:lol: A little context for everyone else: Uncle-Targum has been discovering random food parallels between E. Africans and Yemenite Jews or even E. Africans and Jews in general like how many of us use a word that exists even classical Hebrew for soup ("Maraq") and it's been making his head spin, I see.


oily flaky layered dough

Does it look like or is it made like this (http://xawaash.com/?p=3918#sthash.nQVBVTP3.QSkjgRg7.dpbs)?

blackflash16
08-03-2017, 12:22 AM
now I am really in twilight zone: Malawahh is Yemenite Jewish oily flaky layered dough now eaten by all Israelis and American Jews-frozen malawahh dough found at any Walmart in Jewish areas-that's also Somali lol?

Lol. Yep, Sabaayad/Kimis is also eaten with cumin in my household. However I would describe Somali Malawax/Malawahh (http://xawaash.com/?p=3918#sthash.nQVBVTP3.dpbs) as being more crepe-like than flaky.

Awale
08-03-2017, 12:40 AM
I just remembered something else I liked growing up... The folktales. I was told a lot of stories like these when I was little (maybe 3-7):

Link (http://www.ethiopianfolktales.com/en/somalia/213-degder)
Link (https://books.google.ae/books?id=MDJZnUc2eZAC&pg=PA145&lpg=PA145&dq=wiilwaal,+somali+hero&source=bl&ots=my3TFNohKK&sig=sCRE0xI2jrN4Qc5owZO4mdJwtmo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwju2o_S6LnVAhXJKlAKHbcuA6EQ6AEINzAD#v=on epage&q=wiilwaal%2C%20somali%20hero&f=false)
Link (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arawelo)

They were often joined by stories about the prophets and I still remember how excited I'd be every night to have the stories told to me before I went to sleep. It's funny given that I watched TV 24/7 at the time (http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?1262-The-What-Are-You-Watching-On-TV-Thread&p=204239&viewfull=1#post204239) but still felt real excited to hear about Dhegdheer or Muse/Moses' story for like the 11 billionth time. :lol:

Targum
08-03-2017, 02:08 AM
I have no clue how it's made, to be honest. I've had relatives explain the ingredients for it and Canjeero to me several times but I always forgot. Found this, though:

http://xawaash.com/?p=2250
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/246109/sabaayad-somali-flatbread/



:lol: A little context for everyone else: Uncle-Targum has been discovering random food parallels between E. Africans and Yemenite Jews or even E. Africans and Jews in general like how many of us use a word that exists even classical Hebrew for soup ("Maraq") and it's been making his head spin, I see.



Does it look like or is it made like this (http://xawaash.com/?p=3918#sthash.nQVBVTP3.QSkjgRg7.dpbs)?


Yes looks similar but ours is like layers of phyllo type dough. We do not primarily eat it sweet ( a minority eat with honey) rather with grated fresh tomato and zehhug made from hot peppers black pepper salt garlic and cardamom pounded together and dipped in.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
08-03-2017, 06:44 AM
In Somaliland (self declared Republic in NW Somalia) we also eat Chapati perhaps it was learned in Aden or brought by Indian merchants/soldiers for the British Empire.In Somali we call it sabaayad
http://www.mysomalifood.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/Sabaayad-1.jpg

Very true. many Swahilis from my hometown in Mombasa think chapati is a swahili dish along with chai, biryani and bajias or pakoras.

drobbah
08-03-2017, 09:15 PM
^Ye those dishes are definently of South Asian origin lol.I remember when I first visited Hargeisa I was shocked to find out everyone called bread "rooti" while growing up in Canada my parents always used the traditional Somali word (furin) or the Arabic words for bread like (caysh).South Asia definently influenced not only parts of Arabia but large chunks of the E.African coast.

For example the Somali word for car is "Gadhi".The "dh" is pronounced with a "r" depending on the accent but this word is directly from Hindi and another loan word is baraf which means snow.

Awale
08-04-2017, 01:29 AM
^Ye those dishes are definently of South Asian origin lol.I remember when I first visited Hargeisa I was shocked to find out everyone called bread "rooti" while growing up in Canada my parents always used the traditional Somali word (furin) or the Arabic words for bread like (caysh).South Asia definently influenced not only parts of Arabia but large chunks of the E.African coast.


Damn, I've never heard of "furin". My family used "rōti". I noticed "rōti"'s origins a long time ago, though. There are a number of random Indo-Aryan loans like this in the various North-Coastal Somali dialects, from what I gather. Honestly, ever since Benadiris started turning up as 20% or so South Asian; I've been pretty surprised by how much I'd underestimated South-Asian influences and contact in the region.

Deftextra
08-04-2017, 02:59 PM
Somalis in other regions eat it too. I ate it a lot as a kid (still do from time to time). My mother had this funny habit of cutting it up into little pieces, throwing said pieces into a bowl and then mixing in sugar and tea. Simply put, it was sublime.

I remember my father doing exactly the same thing growing up, but mixing it with coffee instead.

Awale
08-04-2017, 03:03 PM
I remember my father doing exactly the same thing growing up, but mixing it with coffee instead.

:lol: Good to know she didn't just make it up entirely. Must be thing to some folks, then.

Targum
08-04-2017, 05:16 PM
Our Somali-Israeli carbohydrate+fat intersection:

Israeli-Yemenite malawahh preparation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEkJYlYNlYU

Israeli malawahh making machine (start-up nation indeed):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANORTgm4k6E

Israeli-Yemenite lahhuhh + maraq preparation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shcCX-zp-QM

Kali
08-15-2017, 04:34 AM
MY very first comment here and I couldn't help myself with all this appetizing food.

My family is from Somaliland and for the life of me I've never heard the word Lahoh used outside of our region (even Southern Somalis are not familiar with it). Lahoh (Laxox) is a staple food its eaten for breakfast with sugar/butter and tea. Its eaten with maraq, sunanad (sanuna) which is sauce of any kind, with hilib suqar (cut up meat) basically used as bread and eaten daily. It's made exactly like in the video.

My family is a typical Somali family scattered all over the globe and the one thing that unites all the cousins from North America, to Europe and the ME is Fata Moos. I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet. Feta/Fata moose is cut up Sabayad mashed with bananas and smothered with butter - simply divine

Two other things popular in our family are Cambabur and Mucbayle(mucbail - not so sure about the spelling). Both made first day of Eid and eaten sweet with sugar.

Awale
09-03-2017, 05:01 AM
I remember my father doing exactly the same thing growing up, but mixing it with coffee instead.

This time with some tea and olive oil:

https://i.imgur.com/yEeoayN.jpg

It was truly sublime.

drobbah
09-03-2017, 03:28 PM
MY very first comment here and I couldn't help myself with all this appetizing food.

My family is from Somaliland and for the life of me I've never heard the word Lahoh used outside of our region (even Southern Somalis are not familiar with it). Lahoh (Laxox) is a staple food its eaten for breakfast with sugar/butter and tea. Its eaten with maraq, sunanad (sanuna) which is sauce of any kind, with hilib suqar (cut up meat) basically used as bread and eaten daily. It's made exactly like in the video.

My family is a typical Somali family scattered all over the globe and the one thing that unites all the cousins from North America, to Europe and the ME is Fata Moos. I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet. Feta/Fata moose is cut up Sabayad mashed with bananas and smothered with butter - simply divine

Two other things popular in our family are Cambabur and Mucbayle(mucbail - not so sure about the spelling). Both made first day of Eid and eaten sweet with sugar.
This is the first I have ever heard of fata moos.I asked my mum and she said exactly what you wrote except they also add fish into the mix which is odd since Somalis traditionally despised sea food.Apparently it originated from Yemen which makes much more sense.

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
09-03-2017, 04:47 PM
More of Swahili culture
Swahili art a mixture of persian and african influence.
18533
Henna
18534
Swahili wedding as we swahilis call is harusi
18535

wgjkkwjkf
09-03-2017, 10:54 PM
More of Swahili culture
Swahili art a mixture of persian and african influence.

Henna

Swahili wedding as we swahilis call is harusi


nice photos