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J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 11:43 AM
What do the blue dots on Living DNA's "Your Ancestry Through History" map represent?

04-05-2017, 12:00 PM
What do the blue dots on Living DNA's "Your Ancestry Through History" map represent?

I was thinking it was similar DNA to yours, but I could be wrong.

ollie444
04-05-2017, 12:05 PM
I was thinking it was similar DNA to yours, but I could be wrong.

I think you're right, Living DNA don't seem to offer a clear explanation though. I have noticed that everyone's is different, it's not a generic map as some have speculated. It seems to imply that the dots are possible locations of our ancestors, but would a Brit have ancestors from America?

My map at same time and location is subtly different to yours:

14963

ollie444
04-05-2017, 12:06 PM
I was thinking it was similar DNA to yours, but I could be wrong.

I think you're right, Living DNA don't seem to offer a clear explanation though. I have noticed that everyones is different, it's not a generic map as some have speculated. It seems to imply that the dots are possible locations of our ancestors, but would a Brit have ancestors from America?

My map at same time and location is subtly different to J1 DYS388=13's:

14963

04-05-2017, 12:09 PM
Hmmm, but i suppose the idea is when we go back far enough we are all kind of related to everybody, so suppose having ancestors in the Americas, would make sense

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 12:16 PM
Since it's not just me who doesn't know, I'd better e-mail the company and ask.

04-05-2017, 12:23 PM
im sure others will pipe up soon.

Mike_G
04-05-2017, 12:32 PM
Thanks for bringing this up. My doesn't make sense for me, so I thought it was generic. Odd that 500 years ago England is empty on my map yet their DNA numbers say that I have approximately 40% English DNA and no Western European:

14964

But England is filled in here at 1200 years ago:

14966

ollie444
04-05-2017, 12:54 PM
Hmmm, but i suppose the idea is when we go back far enough we are all kind of related to everybody, so suppose having ancestors in the Americas, would make sense

We might all be related to everybody if we go back far enough, but those ancestors would be in Africa wouldn't they?

04-05-2017, 01:06 PM
We might all be related to everybody if we go back far enough, but those ancestors would be in Africa wouldn't they?

I suppose how far back we go, I do not understand the maps well enough really.

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 01:15 PM
I have already received a reply from Living DNA. I will post part of it here later if the company does not object.

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 01:37 PM
This was the main part of the reply from Living DNA. Posted with permission.

"The dots on the map illustrate human population density today, with approximately one dot per million people. [My comment: That has to mean the world map; the dots on the Britain map cannot represent more than about 25,000 people each] There are more dots in the regions where the largest numbers of descendants of your ancestors, at different times in the past, now live. The darker the country in colour indicates the density of populations group where the largest numbers of descendants of your ancestors, at different times in the past, now live.

For technical reasons, we are currently unable to detect shared ancestry less than 5%. You will see ancestry with distant places appearing only when it reaches 5% of your genome, at the detection limit of our approach.

Finally, note this is a development feature that uses an unpublished model of ancestry shared via ancient populations, as we continue to improve and test this and future models, therefore your results are potentially subject to significant change as accuracy increases."

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 01:53 PM
deleted

AntG
04-05-2017, 03:45 PM
We might all be related to everybody if we go back far enough, but those ancestors would be in Africa wouldn't they?

I think it is confusing too... maybe it is highlighting that the further you go back in time, the more people you are related to, and those are the dots showing that you are basically related to everyone else in the world (but where they are currently?).

I think this falls under their objective to tackle racism...
https://www.livingdna.com/en-gb/what-makes-us-different

Combating Racism

Through our close partnerships with anti-racism charities including Show Racism the Red Card, we use DNA testing to help children understand that genetically, race does not exist. Personalised educational books are delivered as part of our programs to children across the world. These books contain the child’s genetic ancestry breakdown and show how they are connected to other populations around the world. The results have shown the combination of DNA testing and interactive lesson plans has provided a long term shift in perception over race.

AntG
04-05-2017, 03:47 PM
I should have made sure I read the 2nd page posts before replying ;)

sktibo
04-05-2017, 06:03 PM
14989
14990

Interesting, I thought these maps were the same for everyone. Guess not. Can you guys please post your maps from these time periods so I can compare? I noticed mine have the most dots around central England, although I have no percentages from Yorkshire, CE, or NW England. I wonder how they determine these maps. It's also weird that I have so many dots in France and yet it's Europe- unassigned and nothing else.

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 06:31 PM
Your attachments won't display.

Anyway, I think the dots may be the same, but they only appear in the areas where you match the database, at least a little.

sktibo
04-05-2017, 06:46 PM
Your attachments won't display.

Anyway, I think the dots may be the same, but they only appear in the areas where you match the database, at least a little.

14995

14996

Do those work?

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 06:56 PM
Yes. Please see post 13, which has my Post-Norman map which I was unable to delete from a spoiled post.

They are definitely not the same. I'll have to give up on this for a while.

JMcB
04-05-2017, 07:26 PM
Here you go sktibo,

14997

14998

J1 DYS388=13
04-05-2017, 07:40 PM
JMcB and sktibo, what do you think the dots represent?

JMcB
04-05-2017, 08:29 PM
JMcB and sktibo, what do you think the dots represent?


Well, until you pointed out that everybody's maps were different, I thought it was just a generic history of population migrations and settlements. Frankly, I didn't really pay any attention to it. Although, it does seem to be more personalized than I originally thought. Unfortunately, their language isn't always as clear as it could be, so I can't say for sure what they mean. According to his letter, the dots represent where the descendants of our ancestors settled, viewed during different time periods. However, I wouldn't bet my bottom dollar on it. What do you think?

Here's their intro:

What you call your ancestry will depend on what point in history you are looking at. With the through history interactive map we show the spread of your ancestors today from different points in history. The further back in history you look from the wider the spread of your ancestors until the point you see the entire world map lighting up showing how all share common ancestors together and the fact that we are all made up of all of us.

sktibo
04-06-2017, 12:06 AM
JMcB and sktibo, what do you think the dots represent?

Approximate locations they think our ancestors might have lived in

J1 DYS388=13
04-06-2017, 08:05 AM
I think I'm beginning to see what Living DNA is doing. The dots are cumulative as you go back in time. The dots added to earlier maps must be weaker and weaker matches to individual cases in reference populations. The algorithm then darkens the area to which the reference cases belong to indicate either the strength of the DNA match or the relative frequency of it.

I also think I see how a person like me who is half Eastern European and half Irish/Anglo Irish can score 67.5% "Great Britain and Ireland" --- Anglo Irish must be getting double points, counted as Irish and counted as southern English.

Genetic genealogy is an interesting hobby, although it's all brainwork.

04-06-2017, 11:27 AM
14995

14996

Do those work?

Here is mine Sktibo
Post Norman
15018
Age of Discovery
15019

ollie444
04-06-2017, 11:38 AM
Here is mine Sktibo
Post Norman
15018
Age of Discovery
15019

How come there are less dots for Britain in the more recent map?

04-06-2017, 11:44 AM
How come there are less dots for Britain in the more recent map?

Hi Ollie, can you clarify your question? are you talking about the Age of Discovery one?

kevinduffy
04-06-2017, 12:13 PM
genetically, race does not exist

If they really believe this then they shouldn't be wasting their time - and their customers' money - with autosomal analysis.

04-06-2017, 12:20 PM
i'm pretty sure the Human race exists, and within it there is a multitude of equally beautiful & diverse ethnicities, and it is this diverse "ethnicities" through dna is what people are interested in to find out where their ancestors originated.

Jessie
04-06-2017, 01:10 PM
I didn't even notice this feature until this thread. Here are my maps.

http://i66.tinypic.com/2ltshp1.jpg

http://i65.tinypic.com/13ygis5.jpg

04-06-2017, 01:13 PM
[QUOTE=Jessie;225004]I didn't even notice this feature until this thread. Here are my maps.

Hey Jessie!

Your screenshots are not visible to us. (I always use the basic uploader,seems to work better)

ollie444
04-06-2017, 01:19 PM
Hi Ollie, can you clarify your question? are you talking about the Age of Discovery one?

I was wondering why the 'age of discovery' map (500 years ago) had fewer dots than the 'post norman britain' one. You'd think the further back you went, the more people you'd share DNA with.

Some sort of key for the map would be really helpful.

04-06-2017, 01:22 PM
I was wondering why the 'age of discovery' map (500 years ago) had fewer dots than the 'post norman britain' one. You'd think the further back you went, the more people you'd share DNA with.

Some sort of key for the map would be really helpful.

From LivingDNA response, seems the whole algorithm and software built around it is "work in progress", but maybe some of the others might pipe up about that.

Jessie
04-06-2017, 01:40 PM
I've never had that problem before. I'll try to attach.

15025

15026

rod
04-06-2017, 01:40 PM
The Great Migration (1700 years ago)
15022

The Middle Ages (1200 years ago)
15023

The Age of Discovery (500 years ago)
15024

The "Middle Ages" chart (before Scotland, Ireland, and Norway disappeared) better represents my ancestry 500 years ago than my 93.6% "British & Irish" results. Did all of those people really move to England?

JMcB
04-06-2017, 03:12 PM
I've never had that problem before. I'll try to attach.

15025

15026

Jessie, just so you know, I saw you previous maps just fine. So the problem may be on sgdavies end.

04-06-2017, 05:38 PM
Jessie, just so you know, I saw you previous maps just fine. So the problem may be on sgdavies end.

Could be JMcB, just checked on wife's home laptop, and I see Jessie's original uploads fine.

Jessie
04-07-2017, 01:16 AM
Could be JMcB, just checked on wife's home laptop, and I see Jessie's original uploads fine.

I've never used the upload function before and it's great to know you can upload things like pdfs, pictures straight from your own computer etc. So I've learned something else. :)

Jessie
04-07-2017, 02:52 AM
I've never had that problem before. I'll try to attach.

15025

15026

Some backup for the Living Through History maps.

I wasn't aware that my Paternal Grandmother's name might have Scottish links.

https://www.houseofnames.com/ganly-family-crest

Also on my paternal side is this surname. I actually match with MacClelland's and Cleland's on 23andme. My Leland's are from Roscommon.

http://names.mooseroots.com/l/11181/Leland
https://www.johngrenham.com/findasurname.php?surname=Leland

So I'm presuming there is a Scottish connection especially with the results from LivingDNA.

This is my K13

Admix Results (sorted):


# Population Percent
1 North_Atlantic 52.04
2 Baltic 25.27
3 West_Med 9.81
4 West_Asian 7.25
5 East_Med 1.77
6 Red_Sea 1.50
7 Amerindian 1.38


Finished reading population data. 204 populations found.
13 components mode.

--------------------------------

Least-squares method.

Using 1 population approximation:
1 North_Dutch @ 3.343981
2 Irish @ 3.397813
3 West_Scottish @ 4.026271
4 Norwegian @ 4.042346
5 Orcadian @ 4.244986
6 Danish @ 4.289660
7 North_German @ 6.192955
8 Southeast_English @ 6.842666
9 Southwest_English @ 6.901150
10 Swedish @ 7.318733
11 South_Dutch @ 11.629003
12 West_German @ 12.655422
13 North_Swedish @ 14.482445
14 Austrian @ 17.549162
15 East_German @ 17.693420
16 French @ 18.062477
17 Hungarian @ 22.544872
18 Southwest_Finnish @ 23.876503
19 Spanish_Cataluna @ 26.292759
20 Southwest_French @ 27.316259

Using 2 populations approximation:
1 50% Irish +50% Norwegian @ 2.522953


Using 3 populations approximation:
1 50% Irish +25% Norwegian +25% Norwegian @ 2.522953


Using 4 populations approximation:
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++
1 Irish + Norwegian + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.519424
2 Irish + Irish + Norwegian + Norwegian @ 2.522953
3 Irish + Irish + North_Dutch + Norwegian @ 2.540311
4 Irish + North_Dutch + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.548502
5 Norwegian + Norwegian + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 2.564251
6 North_Dutch + Norwegian + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 2.622005
7 North_German + Norwegian + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 2.648387
8 Irish + Irish + Irish + Norwegian @ 2.664680
9 Irish + North_German + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.680890
10 Danish + Irish + Irish + Norwegian @ 2.683445
11 Danish + Irish + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.695799
12 Irish + Irish + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.721051
13 North_Dutch + North_Dutch + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.729033
14 Danish + Norwegian + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 2.747781
15 Irish + Irish + Swedish + West_Scottish @ 2.753577
16 Irish + Irish + North_German + Norwegian @ 2.764748
17 Irish + North_Dutch + North_Dutch + Norwegian @ 2.766720
18 North_Dutch + Norwegian + Norwegian + West_Scottish @ 2.767802
19 Irish + Swedish + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 2.767981
20 Irish + Irish + Irish + Swedish @ 2.775764

My K15

Admix Results (sorted):


# Population Percent
1 North_Sea 37.04
2 Atlantic 29.88
3 Baltic 11.89
4 Eastern_Euro 8.75
5 West_Asian 5.16
6 West_Med 4.95
7 Amerindian 1.15
8 Red_Sea 1.10


Finished reading population data. 207 populations found.
15 components mode.

--------------------------------

Least-squares method.

Using 1 population approximation:
1 Irish @ 3.425280
2 West_Scottish @ 3.557808
3 North_Dutch @ 4.181393
4 Danish @ 4.453959
5 Orcadian @ 5.505360
6 Southeast_English @ 5.676529
7 North_German @ 5.882824
8 Southwest_English @ 7.466283
9 Norwegian @ 8.417722
10 West_Norwegian @ 8.735489
11 Swedish @ 9.296607
12 South_Dutch @ 11.184519
13 West_German @ 12.499153
14 North_Swedish @ 12.662151
15 East_German @ 16.492691
16 French @ 16.524723
17 Southwest_Finnish @ 17.903034
18 Austrian @ 21.142027
19 Finnish @ 21.647963
20 Hungarian @ 21.914810

Using 2 populations approximation:
1 50% Irish +50% North_Dutch @ 3.203073


Using 3 populations approximation:
1 50% Irish +25% North_Dutch +25% West_Scottish @ 3.143203


Using 4 populations approximation:
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++
1 Irish + North_German + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 3.125094
2 North_German + West_Scottish + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 3.128713
3 Irish + Irish + North_Dutch + West_Scottish @ 3.143203
4 Irish + Irish + North_German + Orcadian @ 3.144938
5 Irish + Irish + Irish + North_Dutch @ 3.150105
6 Irish + North_German + Orcadian + West_Scottish @ 3.159487
7 Irish + Irish + North_German + West_Scottish @ 3.182833
8 North_Dutch + North_German + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 3.183386
9 Irish + North_Dutch + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 3.193700
10 Irish + North_Dutch + North_German + West_Scottish @ 3.195021
11 North_German + Orcadian + West_Scottish + West_Scottish @ 3.202463
12 Irish + Irish + North_Dutch + North_Dutch @ 3.203073
13 Danish + Irish + Irish + North_Dutch @ 3.235043
14 Danish + Irish + Irish + Irish @ 3.235556
15 Irish + North_Dutch + North_Dutch + West_Scottish @ 3.238354
16 Danish + Irish + Irish + West_Scottish @ 3.248949
17 Irish + Irish + North_Dutch + North_German @ 3.252259
18 Irish + Irish + Irish + Swedish @ 3.254036
19 Irish + North_Dutch + North_German + Orcadian @ 3.259177
20 Irish + Irish + Irish + North_German @ 3.268316

Dibran
04-08-2017, 12:17 AM
Is this feature available to other testers from the 80 regions?

I'm still awaiting my results. However, I noticed all these maps are north west Europe and not south or east.

Mike_G
04-08-2017, 01:25 AM
Is this feature available to other testers from the 80 regions?

I'm still awaiting my results. However, I noticed all these maps are north west Europe and not south or east.

Yes my Eastern European sections reflect population movement on the Europe map.

sktibo
04-08-2017, 03:05 AM
Is this feature available to other testers from the 80 regions?

I'm still awaiting my results. However, I noticed all these maps are north west Europe and not south or east.

15082

I don't have much eastern ancestry but see the dots in Poland and Ukraine. Most of us are mostly Britain and or Ireland so that's why all these maps are NW Europe focused

Mike_G
04-08-2017, 03:03 PM
15082

I don't have much eastern ancestry but see the dots in Poland and Ukraine. Most of us are mostly Britain and or Ireland so that's why all these maps are NW Europe focused

Skitbo I noticed that you have a region just west of the Oder River between Germany and Poland that's shaded a little darker than the rest of Eastern Europe. I have the same, and it stays a darker shade throughout most of the timelines. Not sure what that area signifies, but it is interesting:

15098

sktibo
04-09-2017, 03:42 AM
Skitbo I noticed that you have a region just west of the Oder River between Germany and Poland that's shaded a little darker than the rest of Eastern Europe. I have the same, and it stays a darker shade throughout most of the timelines. Not sure what that area signifies, but it is interesting:

15098

Interesting observation. I don't know either - my German ancestors lived in what is today Poland, possibly near the eastern border of Germany.

J1 DYS388=13
04-09-2017, 08:30 AM
I assumed that was an overlap between the two regions.

Calas
04-09-2017, 08:56 AM
Skitbo I noticed that you have a region just west of the Oder River between Germany and Poland that's shaded a little darker than the rest of Eastern Europe. I have the same, and it stays a darker shade throughout most of the timelines. Not sure what that area signifies, but it is interesting:

I take it you are unaware of the fact there were actually enough Poles in England that not only did Shakespeare write about such English Poles in some of his work but during the 1600s some of them happened to shipped to a few of the "British" colonies in the Americas? Sure, I doubt all of them were running around screaming they were Poles, and some names like Piotruś Nowak [/Nowakowski] may have become Peter Newman to avoid discrimination. But such information can be found in history books. The locals did, after all, happen to note when their neighbors weren't quite locals themselves.

Dibran
04-09-2017, 08:21 PM
15082

I don't have much eastern ancestry but see the dots in Poland and Ukraine. Most of us are mostly Britain and or Ireland so that's why all these maps are NW Europe focused

Ahhh. I see. Thank you for the clarification. Curious to see what mine shows being from the Balkans.

ADW_1981
04-11-2017, 01:53 AM
Mine is kind of neat

UK: Similar to my overall LivingDNA results. East England has the strongest heat, but there is also a very, very light heat over North Ireland and the Scottish Highlands which doesn't appear in my standard results.
Europe: Scandinavia, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany have light heat, but France and the Balearic islands (!?) have a medium heat. (I have 300 year old Huguenot ancestry so it makes sense that this is the next closest ancestry outside of England) My eyes barely noticed very light heat in Czechslovakia, Hungary, but also unexpectedly central Italy.
World: Additions of Turkey, Russia, Finland, NW Balkans, and even Spain have some heat. Most unexpectedly, Turkey had a medium heat.

15154
15155
15156

JMcB
04-11-2017, 04:22 AM
Mine is kind of neat

UK: Similar to my overall LivingDNA results. East England has the strongest heat, but there is also a very, very light heat over North Ireland and the Scottish Highlands which doesn't appear in my standard results.
Europe: Scandinavia, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany have light heat, but France and the Balearic islands (!?) have a medium heat. (I have 300 year old Huguenot ancestry so it makes sense that this is the next closest ancestry outside of England) My eyes barely noticed very light heat in Czechslovakia, Hungary, but also unexpectedly central Italy.
World: Additions of Turkey, Russia, Finland, NW Balkans, and even Spain have some heat. Most unexpectedly, Turkey had a medium heat.

15154
15155
15156

Yes, I agree, this is turning out to be an interesting feature.

I'm not sure how significant this may be but back when my BigY results came in, my Z140 administrator told me that I had formed a cluster with twelve other men whose STRs & SNPs he was dating to around the year 500 A.D. and placing in the area of the Anglian Kingdom of Northumbria.

15161


Now this was not really reflected in my Living DNA results because they only go back about 10 generations, which doesn't cover the time period in question. So I didn't pay any attention to it.

15158


Then I started looking at the Through History Maps and noticed this one from the Middle Ages which was dated to around the year 800 A.D. Which is just about when the Kingdom of Northumbria was coming to it's end.

15159


As I said, I'm not sure how much significance I can give to this but the map's density and placement does seem to indicate that my ancestors were in the area during the time period in question.

At any rate, it is interesting to contemplate.

JMcB
04-11-2017, 07:52 PM
For those who would like to wade through their full explanation, here it is:


What does my autosomal “Through History” plot show? | Living DNA

What you call your ancestry will depend on what point in history you are looking at. This map is designed to show a geographical location and the concentration of our common ancestors descendants from that point in history.

You will see that there is an increase and decrease in dots on the map, these are showing us the population density (number of people per area ) of our ancestors' descendants in the present day. So the further back in history you look you can see the wider your geographical spread of ancestors becomes, until the point you see the entire world map lighting up showing how all share common ancestors together and the fact that we are all made up of all of us.

In brief, this plot shows where you have relatives “today” (1492AD before the colonial era migrations), shared through all of the ancestors that were alive a given number of years ago. In more detail, looking far enough back in time, we all share our whole genome with everyone in the world. Very recently we each share direct ancestry with only a few people. At more interesting timescales, we share ancestry differently with populations across the world.

This feature aims to explore how your ancestry sharing with people alive today changes as we move back in time. The dots on the map illustrate human population density today, with approximately one dot per million people. There are more dots in the regions where the largest numbers of descendants of your ancestors, at different times in the past, now live.

For technical reasons, we are currently unable to detect shared ancestry less than 5% with this method. You may be aware that most people share many ancestors with most other people, even on very recent timescales - around one thousand years within Europe (Ralph and Coop, 2013). However, you have so many relatives 1,000 years ago that these few “unusually distant" relatives account for only a small fraction of your whole genome. You will therefore see ancestry with distant places appearing only when it reaches 5% of your genome, at the detection limit of our approach.

It is very important to note that whilst you know where your relatives live today, we don’t know where your ancestors lived. For example, if you are European, you will share ancestry with India via ancient people that spoke an Indo-European language, but the locations of these groups are still a subject of academic debate (e.g. It is likely to include the steppe, but may also include Anatolia or other locations). As another example, Eurasians will have Native American relatives, shared from before the ancestors of Native Americans crossed the Bering Strait; in this case we know that these ancestors never actually visited the Americas, but the descendants of those ancestors did.

Finally, we note that this is a development feature that uses an unpublished model of ancestry shared via ancient populations. We will continue to improve and test this and future models, and therefore your results are potentially subject to significant change, as accuracy increases.

Ralph and Coop (2013) "The Geography of Recent Genetic Ancestry across Europe”; PLoS Biology 11:e1001555.

angscoire
04-13-2017, 12:30 PM
Post Norman Britain
15223

Europe Age of Discovery 500ybp
15224

J1 DYS388=13
04-13-2017, 03:11 PM
Post Norman Britain
15223

Europe Age of Discovery 500ybp
15224

So a caption for the first map would be "The descendants of your ancestors who lived in 1066 live here today."

And for the second map, "The descendants of your ancestors who lived c.1500AD live here today."

Would that be right?

JMcB
04-13-2017, 06:38 PM
So a caption for the first map would be "The descendants of your ancestors who lived in 1066 live here today."

And for the second map, "The descendants of your ancestors who lived c.1500AD live here today."

Would that be right?

That seems to be what they're saying. Except their "today" appears to be 1492 AD.

"In brief, this plot shows where you have relatives “today” (1492AD before the colonial era migrations), shared through all of the ancestors that were alive a given number of years ago."

J1 DYS388=13
04-14-2017, 08:14 AM
"In brief, this plot shows where you have relatives “today” (1492AD before the colonial era migrations), shared through all of the ancestors that were alive a given number of years ago."

Sorry, I can't make sense of that sentence. Maybe it's me.

JMcB
04-14-2017, 01:41 PM
Sorry, I can't make sense of that sentence. Maybe it's me.

I can certainly understand why because the truth is their language is far from clear and in my opinion their explanation is poorly written.

Be that as it may, from what I can tell by putting "today" in quotation marks and then immediately following it with the bracketed reference to 1492 A.D. they're indicating that that is their reference point. If they were referring to where our ancestor's descendants were actually living in the present (2017's "today") then, as an example, we should be seeing dots and shadings in the United States for each of those ancient and mapped time periods. And we aren't because they seem to have made the Colonial era their cut off point.

It is only by going further back in time to the beginning that you begin to see where all of the descendants of our ancestors are living today.

15246

15247

15245

At least, that's how I'm understanding them.