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JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-11-2017, 11:59 AM
It looks like my very unexpected South Yorkshire percentage is likely to be correct, or near enough anyway.
I've been contacted by a lady (not in the UK) who I have a relatively close match with on Family Finder. She concludes that I must be related to specific great grandparents as I also match with her half-brother.
The male great grandparent was born in Bradford and it is thought the family were from West Yorkshire. Now here is the twist, the female great grandparent was born in Germany and the family were from Bremen.
We haven't quite worked out the relationship but most of my matches so far have been from the Radnorshire (Shropshire border) Lloyds which were a very large family. I believe my 2nd Great Grandfather, James Lloyd's wife had the surname Heywood, not confirmed 100% as yet. I understand Heywood is far more common a name in Lancashire and Yorkshire than it is on the Radnorshire/Shropshire Border. My grandfather's name was Heywood Lloyd Howells.
I think that is where the connection is. James Lloyd was a farmer maybe some connection through the wool trade?
It also might explain some of the German-sounding name matches I get on family finder.
Just goes to show, you can't just go on known ancestry. John

MacUalraig
04-11-2017, 12:26 PM
Interesting, but on the other hand there is a little Heywood hotspot on the Radnor/Shropshire border area separate from the two big areas of Lancs and Devon. Specifically its the Knighton registration district

https://www.ukbmd.org.uk/reg/districts/knighton.html

The question is why this little clump of them?

At the county level Radnorshire has the 3rd highest concentration after Lancs and Cheshire.

04-11-2017, 01:06 PM
That's cool John, I have also over 10% Yorkshire, its my second top result, but cant connect the paper trail yet. But I only recently discovered, this week I have Cornish ancestry, a Sea Pilot from llanelli in the beginning of the 19th Century named "David Perrott", must have been going over to Cornwall, and got married in Talland, near Looe, then brought back his bride, "Rebecca Soady", no idea if "Soady" is a Cornish name though?

So, with the twists and turns of the ancestry tree, there could well be Yorkshire hiding somewhere.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-11-2017, 05:48 PM
"The question is why this little clump of them? "

Yes my Lloyds were from the Parish of Beguildy. In the 1841 Census James Lloyd was farming at Lloyney, Colva. His wife was Eleanor and some of the Lloyds were also living at an adjacent property Little Lloyney. Also living at Little Lloyney was Elizabeth Heywood. I'm speculating that Eleanor and Elizabeth might have been related. The Lloyd family is still in the general area.
I've been told by a Lloyd relative at Powys Family History Society there are still Heywoods around the Presteigne area (I'm not that familiar with the geography). It would be interesting to know the reason why. I could only think of a possible link to farming, (Wool?) but any thoughts welcome. I know from my own research one family can make a big impact on the population - in one generation of the Lloyds there were at least 11 children and in another generation 10. How many survived, I don't know but nearly all my confirmed matches have been from their descendants including in America and Australia.
The map in the link below based on the 1891 census suggests Cheshire Lancashire and Yorkshire were the highest at that time. John

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiqv4fE9pzTAhWkLsAKHT37AxwQFggpMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ancestry.co.uk%2Fname-origin%3Fsurname%3Dheywood&usg=AFQjCNF45RBaQlVwneqMbFD-PGcbbMXgeQ&sig2=8hWMnMa8is8JzcXySOZlqw

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-11-2017, 05:50 PM
Interesting, but on the other hand there is a little Heywood hotspot on the Radnor/Shropshire border area separate from the two big areas of Lancs and Devon. Specifically its the Knighton registration district

https://www.ukbmd.org.uk/reg/districts/knighton.html

The question is why this little clump of them?

At the county level Radnorshire has the 3rd highest concentration after Lancs and Cheshire.

Sorry meant to reply with quote, but I have replied in another post. Thanks for the comments. John

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-11-2017, 06:10 PM
That's cool John, I have also over 10% Yorkshire, its my second top result, but cant connect the paper trail yet. But I only recently discovered, this week I have Cornish ancestry, a Sea Pilot from llanelli in the beginning of the 19th Century named "David Perrott", must have been going over to Cornwall, and got married in Talland, near Looe, then brought back his bride, "Rebecca Soady", no idea if "Soady" is a Cornish name though?

So, with the twists and turns of the ancestry tree, there could well be Yorkshire hiding somewhere.

It's good to find there actually may be a paper trail behind these results. Soady is an odd one, can't really find the meaning other than "moist or wet abode" One link I looked at says most common in Wales another says in Cornwall.
I wonder If I'll ever find my own Cornish. I don't rule it out now. :) John

MacUalraig
04-11-2017, 06:32 PM
"The question is why this little clump of them? "

Yes my Lloyds were from the Parish of Beguildy. In the 1841 Census James Lloyd was farming at Lloyney, Colva. His wife was Eleanor and some of the Lloyds were also living at an adjacent property Little Lloyney. Also living at Little Lloyney was Elizabeth Heywood. I'm speculating that Eleanor and Elizabeth might have been related. The Lloyd family is still in the general area.
I've been told by a Lloyd relative at Powys Family History Society there are still Heywoods around the Presteigne area (I'm not that familiar with the geography). It would be interesting to know the reason why. I could only think of a possible link to farming, (Wool?) but any thoughts welcome. I know from my own research one family can make a big impact on the population - in one generation of the Lloyds there were at least 11 children and in another generation 10. How many survived, I don't know but nearly all my confirmed matches have been from their descendants including in America and Australia.
The map in the link below based on the 1891 census suggests Cheshire Lancashire and Yorkshire were the highest at that time. John

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiqv4fE9pzTAhWkLsAKHT37AxwQFggpMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ancestry.co.uk%2Fname-origin%3Fsurname%3Dheywood&usg=AFQjCNF45RBaQlVwneqMbFD-PGcbbMXgeQ&sig2=8hWMnMa8is8JzcXySOZlqw

I usually plot (and quote) relative not absolute numbers although I look at both. Yorkshire and Lancashire are huge. One very famous Yorkshire genealogist is known to boast that there are more people in Yorkshire than Scotland... :-(

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-11-2017, 08:01 PM
I usually plot (and quote) relative not absolute numbers although I look at both. Yorkshire and Lancashire are huge. One very famous Yorkshire genealogist is known to boast that there are more people in Yorkshire than Scotland... :-(

I understand Yorkshire people aren't exactly reserved when praising the merits of their County and maybe exaggerating slightly. "You don't know you are born". ;) John


https://youtu.be/VKHFZBUTA4k

avalon
04-17-2017, 11:01 AM
That's cool John, I have also over 10% Yorkshire, its my second top result, but cant connect the paper trail yet. But I only recently discovered, this week I have Cornish ancestry, a Sea Pilot from llanelli in the beginning of the 19th Century named "David Perrott", must have been going over to Cornwall, and got married in Talland, near Looe, then brought back his bride, "Rebecca Soady", no idea if "Soady" is a Cornish name though?

So, with the twists and turns of the ancestry tree, there could well be Yorkshire hiding somewhere.

Over 10% is quite a sizeable amount, it's almost the 12.5% you'd expect for ancestry from a single great grandparent so at over 10% it is the sort of ancestry that you would expect to see in a paper trail back to 1800.

Regarding South/West Yorkshire, I tend to think of the woollen industry in Bradford, Leeds, Halifax, but I don't know of any direct links to South Wales. I guess in your case a Yorkshire ancestor may have moved to South Wales in the pre-industrial or early industrial period but even if that was the case, 10% looks like more than just one Yorkshire ancestor within LivingDNA's 10 generations.

on edit, to get 10% you'd need roughly 3 out of 32 or 6 out 64 Yorkshire ancestors, and so on...

Makes me wonder, as I have before, whether the LivingDNA test is over inflating ancestry from English regions due to heavier sampling by POBI and perhaps your Yorkshire % may go down slightly over time if they fine tune their reference set.