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sparkey
04-12-2017, 04:29 PM
Which battles did your ancestors fight in throughout history? Were any of your ancestors wounded, captured, killed, etc.?


Here's my current tally, with research ongoing:

American Revolutionary War
For the Patriots: Lechmere's Point, Snow Campaign, Long Island, Brandywine, Germantown, Stono Ferry (wounded), Siege of Savannah (dismounted), Ramsour's Mill, Camden, Guilford Courthouse, Hobkirk's Hill
For the Loyalists: Hillsborough, Lindley's Mill (killed)

War of 1812
For the USA: New Orleans

American Civil War
For the Union: Mill Springs, Siege of Corinth, 1st Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam (wounded), Perryville, Perryville Indian Territory, Chickamauga (wounded and captured), Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek (wounded), Big Blue, Marais des Cygnes, 2nd Newtonia
For the Confederacy: Siege of Yorktown, Savage's Station, Malvern Hill, Crampton's Gap (wounded), Antietam (captured), Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, 2nd Petersburg, 1st Deep Bottom, Guard Hill, Cedar Creek


Some other conflicts my ancestors participated in, but with no known battles: Ingle's Rebellion (for the rebels), Bacon's Rebellion (for the rebels; executed), Black Hawk War (for the USA), Cherokee Removal (for the USA, sadly), World War II (for the USA--although I've recently ordered some documents that might yet reveal battles for my great-grandfather who I didn't know)

Lirio100
04-12-2017, 05:16 PM
My 2x great grandfather made it all the way down to Vera Cruz in the Mexican war of 1846 to 1848, as part of a Michigan volunteer unit. My father was a very young sailor in WWll. My maternal grandfather was part of the ground crew for bombers, he started from North Africa and ended up in Germany. A great grand uncle was part of Teddy Roosevelt's Great White Fleet (the ships were painted white).

Most of my great grandparents were immigrants, I'd have to research European military history to know what any of them or their ancestors did :P The ages of their descendants fell in between military actions, and were never called up.

I do have one branch here around the time of the Revolutionary War, but haven't yet connected up all the ancestor lines to know for sure. We actually didn't know that line went that far back until I started building a family tree.

Dewsloth
04-12-2017, 05:28 PM
From the 1600s to the 1700s, I have a bunch on my paternal grandmother's British Isles side (on the continent from the Mayflower on).

My grandmother could have chosen from at least 4 ancestors for DAR membership (she chose a colonel from Vermont who was at Ticonderoga).

My German/Ashkenazi ancestors sent two brothers of my 2xgreat grandfather to New York, where they became officers in the Union Army as part of a German unit.
One was a staff officer to General Howard and killed at Chancellorsville: "By a reference to the tabular statement, it will be seen that a large proportion of the regimental commanders engaged were killed, wounded, or taken prisoners. Captain [Francis A.] Dessauer, of my staff, was killed while fearlessly at work rallying the men."

Not sure about WW1, the generations may have gapped it, I think.

WWII: Lebanese/American grandfather served in the infantry in Europe from just after D-Day through the Battle of the Bulge to getting shot through the leg/hip somewhere around the German border (he came home with a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart and lived until 2007).

04-12-2017, 05:38 PM
Battle of Jutland, 1916. HMS Indefatigable, ship sank loss of life of maternal great grand farther, further back in time not sure 100% sure.
But story about British soldier during Napoleonic wars bring back French wife.
More recently Uncle fought in Malaysia for British Army after ww2, and Dad fought in Cyprus, in Trudos mountains, Royal Artilery.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-12-2017, 06:53 PM
My great uncle, Freddy Morgan 3rd Monmouthshire Regiment was killed at the 2nd battle of Ypres, 8th May !915. It was a day of heavy losses for Monmouthshire.
My father fought with the 4th Battalion South Wales Borders in Mesopotamia in World War One and caught malaria. John

Freddy Morgan

15205

Calas
04-12-2017, 06:56 PM
Family, on both sides, has been involved in the military for a number of generations. Or involved in warfare somehow. I am really just recounting off the top of my head. Have to go through thoroughly to get you an exact breakdown. But:


Jacobite Risings 1715 & 1745
Sheriffmuir (Argyll - killed)
Sheriffmuir (Jacobites - wounded)
Sheriffmuir (Jacobites(x2) - survived x 3)

Irish Rebellion of 1798
New Ross - Rebel - captured & executed
Arklow - Rebel - killed
Arklow - British - wounded

War of the First Coalition
Flanders Campaign (survived)
Boxtel (survived)

(Broad) Napoleonic Wars
Battle of Corunna (killed)

Anglo-Russian War
Naval - wounded, killed

American War of Independence
Wounded, killed, surrendered

Anglo-Zulu War 1879
Battle of Inyezane (wounded), Kambula (wounded), & Ulundi (killed)

First Anglo-Sikh War
Aliwal (killed)
Ferozeshah (wounded)

Second Anglo-Afghan War
Ali Masjid - wounded, killed
Fatehabad - wounded
Maiwand - wounded

First & Second Boer War(s)
Again I'd have to go through to give you exact battles but 2 wounded, 1 killed.

World War I
'Bomber' pilot - killed
Fighter pilot x2 - killed, survived
Naval - survived
Infantry - wounded

World War II
Fighter pilot - survived >>>>> Bomber pilot - survived 2 very serious events, killed by a fluke (this is the same person, he switched planes)
Artillery - gassed, survived
Armoured division - Operation Overload/Normandy, survived
SAS - captured then escaped, survived



There's a few others here & there. Some involved in American wars during the colonial period but haven't really noted them beyond name & battle. Might add them later.

Dewsloth
04-12-2017, 07:01 PM
The most recent Archaeology Magazine has a great article about the Scottish survivors of the 1650 Battle of Dunbar and how many of their living descendants ended up in North America. I don't think the article is online (yet), but you can see the header here:
http://www.archaeology.org/issues

Osiris
04-12-2017, 07:21 PM
Two of my 3rd great grandfathers fought in the Battle of Vicksburg in the American Civil War both on the Confederate side. One of them kept a brief diary through the war and if I recall it talks a little bit about the Union ships patrolling the river and their shelling. The other 3rd gr grandfather talked afterwards about being so hungry during the siege he would have fought a dog for a bone.

JMcB
04-12-2017, 08:05 PM
My 4th & 5th Great Grandfathers James and Hugh (Father & Son) both fought in the guerrilla campaigns of General Francis Marion during the Revolutionary War. (Battles unknown) Both survived the war.

15208
Francis Marion

General Francis Marion, known as “The Swamp Fox,” was a Revolutionary officer from Berkeley County, South Carolina. Even though he was a commissioned officer in the South Carolina Second Regiment, he also led a band of irregular fighters in the back- and low-country swamps of South Carolina fighting the British troops under Lord Cornwallis. He is generally credited as the Father of Guerrilla Warfare, and is recognized as such at various War Colleges.


My other 4th & 5th Great Grandfathers (Robt Fleming & Thom MacKie) also fought in the Revolutionary War but I only have information on my 4th GG Robert Fleming. Both survived the war.

Robert served in South Carolina's Camden District under Captains Hannah and Black and Colonels Bratton and Watsons. He also served in the mounted companies under Captains Hannah and Richey. He participated in the Battles of Ramsour Mill, Rocky Mount, Hanging Rock, Wateree, Friday's Fort, and Congaree.

Another 5th Great Grandfather, Dr. Timothy Russell, came to America as a Surgeon in the British Army and then switched sides and fought with Colonists against the British. (Battles unknown) Survived the war.


My 2cd Grandfather Robert fought as a Private in Co. B, 23rd Regt. Mississippi Infantry during the Civil War. All I know is that his Regiment was devastated by illness before they even took the field and in their first action the fort they were holding was captured and they were sent to a Union Prison camp. They were later released in a prisoner exchange and he went on to fight in various battles before being released from service. He survived the war.

Of the others, I know not.

sparkey
04-12-2017, 08:17 PM
My 4th & 5th Great Grandfathers James and Hugh (Father & Son) both fought in the guerrilla campaigns of General Francis Marion during the Revolutionary War. (Battles unknown) Survived the war.

General Francis Marion, known as “The Swamp Fox,” was a Revolutionary officer from Berkeley County, South Carolina. Even though he was a commissioned officer in the South Carolina Second Regiment, he also led a band of irregular fighters in the back- and low-country swamps of South Carolina fighting the British troops under Lord Cornwallis. He is generally credited as the Father of Guerrilla Warfare, and is recognized as such at various War Colleges.

My other 4th & 5th Great Grandfathers also fought in the Revolutionary War but I only have information on my 4th GG Robert Fleming. Survived the war.

He served in South Carolina's Camden District under Captains Hannah and Black and Colonels Bratton and Watsons. He also served in the mounted companies under Captains Hannah and Richey. He participated in the Battles of Ramsour Mill, Rocky Mount, Hanging Rock, Wateree, Friday's Fort, and Congaree.

That's 2 mentions of Ramsour's Mill so far, very interesting. My ancestor who was there was in the NC militia, as were a lot of my Revolutionary War ancestors. I do have 2 ancestors in the SC militia (both for the Ninety-Six District), although I don't have detailed records of their battles. I also descend from the brother of Gen. Thomas Sumter, who commanded the battles at Rocky Mount and Hanging Rock that you mentioned. And who had a little bit of a rivalry for command with Gen. Marion.

Anglecynn
04-12-2017, 08:28 PM
My paternal great-grandfather was in the British Army since around 1910 or thereabouts (started as a drummer boy), fought in the Somme and throughout the first world war, apparently got into hand-to-hand/bayonet combat twice and survived (although was injured in one - apparently his German opponent had trouble stabbing him, but still injured him), i don't know whether he killed them or they were just injured though.

One of my other great-grandfather's (paternal grandmother's father) was a batman - so he was a servant for and fought alongside his Officer in WW1, i think he was shot in the hand at one point (only a minor injury though) but i don't know much else about his specific combat experiences.

A few others also fought in the Great War, one was killed leaving a young widow and daughter (they were more distant though, our family never even knew them and the daughter lived in the same town as my family in the 50s).
One was in the Navy and died in a disaster not far off the coast in 1917 (engine/boiler explosion in the ship i believe).

I believe some also fought in the Boer War but i have no details to hand or memory.

My Grandfather was stationed in Palestine/Egypt in the mid-late 40s, while he was in a mechanic/vehicle rescue role, he still saw some 'action' (although mostly it was Jewish and Arab terrorism/political violence - against each other and also the British Troops).

There's probably more going further back as one part of my family was apparently a notable military family, but i don't know a great deal about them - more to research!

Luckily we didn't lose anyone in the immediate-close family in WW2 as far as i know.

JMcB
04-12-2017, 08:31 PM
That's 2 mentions of Ramsour's Mill so far, very interesting. My ancestor who was there was in the NC militia, as were a lot of my Revolutionary War ancestors. I do have 2 ancestors in the SC militia (both for the Ninety-Six District), although I don't have detailed records of their battles. I also descend from the brother of Gen. Thomas Sumter, who commanded the battles at Rocky Mount and Hanging Rock that you mentioned. And who had a little bit of a rivalry for command with Gen. Marion.

My 4th & 5th Grandfathers (James & Hugh) were both from Abbeville Co which is in the Ninety-Six District. MacKie & Fleming were originally from NC. Fleming was MacKie's son in law.

15209
Gen. Thomas Sumter

In February 1776, Sumter was elected lieutenant colonel of the Second Regiment of the South Carolina Line of which he was later appointed colonel. He subsequently was appointed brigadier general, a post he held until the end of the war. He participated in several battles in the early months of the war, including the campaign to prevent an invasion of Georgia. Perhaps his greatest military achievement was his partisan campaigning, which contributed to Lord Cornwallis' decision to abandon the Carolinas for Virginia.

Sumter acquired the nickname, "Carolina Gamecock," during the American Revolution for his fierce fighting tactics. After the Battle of Blackstock's Farm, British General Banastre Tarleton commented that Sumter "fought like a gamecock", and Cornwallis described the Gamecock as his "greatest plague."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Sumter

Gray Fox
04-12-2017, 09:23 PM
I have a few researched, but this was always my favorite ancestor or rather sibling of one of my ancestors accounts.. I'll post more as I dig them back up, so to speak ;)

Col. Elijah Isaacks of the Wilkes County, North Carolina militia. during the Revolutionary War.

"In the North Carolina State Records, Vol. XXII, pages 211-213, we find a
letter written from Canada by one "Col. David Fanning" after the close
of the war, in which he describes himself as a loyal British subject. He
complains bitterly that "I was forced to leave the place of my nativity
(North Carolina)". He relates many incidents to show how during the war
the British loyalists were mistreated. One of these throws some light on
the aggressive character of Col. Elijah. "Col. Fanning" says: "Col.
Isaacs came down from the mountains with 300 men and formed a camp at
Cox's Mill in the settlement I had formerly ranged, in order to take me;
here he continued nearly three months during which time the following
proclamation was issued: "(Proclamation not copied, but was to the
general effect that citizens not opposing the Continental Government or
resisting the army would not be molested)." During Col. Isaacs' stay ***
he ravaged the whole settlement and burned and destroyed a number of
houses belonging to friends of the Government *** . Two Captains in each
county were appointed by Col. Isaacs to keep the friends of the
Government Down."

RobertCasey
04-12-2017, 10:17 PM
My great great grandfather was William Martin Shelton who was living in northern Arkansas when at the age of 15, was drafted by the Confederate Army to be a flag bearer (50,000 children age 14 to 16 died as flag bearers). He did not believe in the Confederate cause and deserted, going to Missouri where he joined the US Army as a flag bearer. Less than two months later was shot in the chest but survived to later become the father my grandmother.

My Brooks ancestor signed the Mecklenburg County, VA "declaration of independence" from England before the US declaration of independence. He also provided significant supplies to the revolutionary cause - both are qualifying events for DAR/SAR membership. But YDNA determined that he is really not my direct ancestor but adopted my ancestor who was born in 1765. It now appears that his mother was previously married to a Wade man who died young and then she later remarried Robert Brooks who informally adopted two Wade boys who went by the Brooks surname.

My favorite war relative is Daniel Baugh Brooks, who is a first cousin of my great grandfather. At the age of 21, he left Georgia to join the Texas army. He left a wife and daughter behind (estranged). He joined as a First Lieutenant since his uncle was the Captain. I have two letters that he wrote back home to Georgia. The first was very upbeat and the second it was obvious that there was little chance of survival. He was assigned to the Colonel Fannin and his detachment of a dozen soldiers was discovered by a forward party of 200 Mexican soldiers. His party was attempting to build a bridge across a major river as path of possible escape for his 250 man unit. One person escaped and later dictated his war experience where he observed his fellow soldiers being tossed into the river to float down to the Gulf of Mexico. Colonel Fannin and the 250 soldiers were captured by several thousand soldiers of the main column. The next day all but the doctor were executed by the Mexican Army which is known as the Fannin Massacre. His daughter later moved to Texas and was awarded around eight square miles of land for his service via around 20 land grants (over 5,000 acres). I have around 500 pages of documentation of his short life and the land grants granted to his daughter.

GailT
04-13-2017, 01:07 AM
Two of my 3rd great grandfathers fought in the Battle of Vicksburg in the American Civil War both on the Confederate side. One of them kept a brief diary through the war and if I recall it talks a little bit about the Union ships patrolling the river and their shelling.
My gg-grandfather Thomas Thorsen was on the Benton, the flag ship of the Union ironclad fleet, during the Battle of Vicksburg. From his memoir:

Previous to the Battle of Fort Henry the Benton was not in commission so her crew was transferred to the Cincinnati, in which boat they took part in the fight in connection with the Essex and Saint Lewis. These three boats took Fort Henry in a battle of about two hours duration [February 6, 1862]. We guarded Fort Henry until a garrison could be sent on next day to occupy it and then returned to Cairo. Three days later we went aboard the ironclad gun boat Louisville for the Battle of Fort Donaldson [February 11-16, 1862]. That Fort, with 15,000 prisoners was captured by the federal forces, but some of us were so frightened by our experiences that we ran away after returning to Cairo. We soon came back, however, and went aboard the Benton with the rest of the crew, ready for the trip down the river. We then took part in the Battles of Island No. 10 [March 15-April 8, 1862], Fort Pillow [April 13, 1862] and Memphis [June 6, 1862], then up the White River and in the Battle of Vicksburg [July 15-16, 1862].


I also have 4th g-grandtather Adam Crouse who was in a Hessian unit in Napoleon's Grand Armee of 1812 -- he saw Moscow burn, survived the retreat, and later immigrated to the U,S,

MitchellSince1893
04-13-2017, 02:13 AM
7th great grandfather, Captain Christopher Green (British Army), killed at the Battle of Minden in 1759.

A decisive engagement during the Seven Years' War, fought on 1 August 1759. An Anglo-German army under the overall command of Field Marshal Ferdinand of Brunswick defeated a French army commanded by Marshal of France, Marquis de Contades


Adjutant in the 37th (Royal Hampshire Regiment) at Minden, where he had been killed.The total allied casualties were 13 Officers, and 337 men killed and missing with 63 Officers and 960 men wounded of these the 37th suffered 3 Officers, 1 Sergeant and 69 men (total 73) killed and 12 Officers, 4 Sergeants, 4 Drummers and 180 men ( total 200 ) wounded a total of 54% of its strength, the French lost 7,000 - 11,000 men 40 cannon 20 colours and standards. Roses grew in profusion on the battlefield the British troops picked them and placed them in their hats. This was the first time British Infantry had attacked massed squadrons of cavalry.

6th great grandfather Major General Christopher Green (1748-1805) son of above Capt Green. Fought in Second Mysore War, Second Rohilla War, and Battle of Bitaurah for British in India.

5th great grandmother Anne Green (daughter of Maj General Christopher Green). She was at Shikohabad, India in 1803 when her husband Charles Child Wilson was on service and she was taken prisoner by Monsieur Fleury (European mercenary leading India troops against the British) when he attacked Shikohabad in September 1803 and carried off to Agra Fort Anne with all her children (my 4th great grandfather was born 3 years later).

Attack on Shikohabad: Mainpuri became the head quarters of the civil administration and small cantonments were established there and at Shikohabad. In 1803 the great confederacy of the Marathas under Dulat Rao Sindhia and the Central Indian Chiefs assumed such threatening proportion that a simultaneous Campaign against them was organized in Northern India and the Deccan, and in August Lord Lake advanced through Kannuj and Mainpuri to attack General Pierre Perron at Aligharh. While the British force was engaged at Aligarh a body of 5,000 Maratha horse under M. Fleury, one of General Perron’s lieutenants, suddenly appeared before Shikohabad and made a fierce attack on the cantonment, which was commanded by Lt.-Col. Cunningham. The whole force at that officer’s disposal consisted of 5 companies of Native Infantry and 1 gun, but the little garrison made so determined a resistance that after an engagement lasting ten hours the enemy was repulsed with heavy loss. Two days later, however, the attack was renewed and after several hours, resistance the British commander, who was himself wounded as well as four of his officers, was obliged to capitulate. The only condition exacted was that the troops should not again be employed against Sindha during the campaign and the garrison marched out with all the honours of war, taking its one gun with it. The Marathas then burnt and pillaged the contonment. Immediately on receiving the news of the attack on Shikohabad Lord Lake dispatched a detachment of cavalry under Col. Macan to its relief, but the enemy, declining an engagement, retired precipitately across the Yamuna.

5th great grandfather Major Charles Child Wilson (husband of above Anne Green). Fought for British in India in Operations in Jumna Doab 1803; Sasni; Second Mahratta War 1803; Battle of Delhi. Operations against Dhundia Khan 1807.

8th great grandfather Frederick Starnes Sr. Fought in French and Indian War on American-British side . Near present day Chilhowie, Virginia,
Frederick was attacked July 3,1755 by several Shawnee Indians, who fired upon him and wounded him. Frederick was able to return fire and escape the attack.

7th great grandfather Frederick Starnes Jr. served in French and Indian War along with his father (my 8th great grandfather above). He assisted Daniel Boone (yes the famous one) in building Fort Boonesborough in Kentucky. He was killed in an ambush by Indians in 1779.
On April 7, 1779, Frederick Jr., his brother Joseph, Joseph Jr. and son-in-law Michael Moyer,along with 8 other men from the fort, set out to scout some land south of Fort Boonesborough. About 25 miles south of the fort, the party reached a water couse known as the "Lower Blue Licks Creek." This would take them back onto the Wilderness Trail. Eventually, they entered the narrow Blue Licks Creek valley just below the headwater springs. Here, on the banks of the creek, in a heavily wooded area close to the Blue Licks Springs, a large group of Indians (25-30 according to the only survivor) attacked the Starnes-led group. Joseph Starnes, Jr. was the only survivor.
http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=30628

5th great grandfather Britian Belk: The Battle of Waxhaws/ Buford's Massacre
mortally wounded in "Battle of Waxhaws," which in reality is the Buford Battle Field. This battles was fought May 29...He was struck in the head by a sword of a Tory cavalryman under General Tarleton.

Battle of Waxhaws (also known as the Waxhaws or Waxhaw massacre, and Buford's massacre) took place during the American Revolutionary War on May 29, 1780, near Lancaster, South Carolina, between a Continental Army force led by Abraham Buford and a mainly Loyalist force led by British officer Banastre Tarleton. Buford refused an initial demand to surrender, but when his men were attacked by Tarleton's cavalry, many threw down their arms to surrender. Buford apparently attempted to surrender. However, the British commanding officer Tarleton was shot at during the truce, having his horse fall and trap him. Loyalists and British troops were outraged at the breaking of the truce in this manner and proceeded to fall on the rebels.[2][page needed][3][page needed]
While Tarleton was trapped under his dead horse, men continued killing the Continental soldiers, including men who were not resisting. Little quarter was given to the patriots/rebels. Of the 400 or so Continentals, 113 were killed with sabers, 150 so badly injured they could not be moved and 53 prisoners were taken by the British and Loyalists. "Tarleton's quarter", thereafter became a common expression for refusing to take prisoners. In some subsequent battles in the Carolinas, few of the defeated were taken alive by either side. This 'Battle of Waxhaws' became the subject of an intensive propaganda campaign by the Continental Army to bolster recruitment and incite resentment against the British. Equally valid accounts of the battle by soldiers from both sides describe Tarleton as having no part in ordering a massacre as he had been trapped under his horse, and when freed immediately ordered thorough medical treatment of American prisoners and wounded.

Multiple 3rd great grandfathers were privates in Confederate Army during US Civil War and fought in various battles.

Both grandfathers fought in World War II, but neither were front line soldiers. Paternal grandfather ran into a German soldier as he left a headquarters meeting in France as he turned a street corner. Both my grandfather and the German soldier got up and ran in opposite directions. Maternal grandfather fought in th Pacific. He fired his pistol at 5 o'clock Charlie...A Japanese pilot that tried every day at 5pm to bomb their ammo dump in New Guinea. He also was in Tokyo Harbor at the end of the war and took an Ariska rifle with bayonet from a Japanese soldier at the port. I still have this rifle.

Lirio100
04-13-2017, 02:44 AM
I have one more--I was thinking of US military service. My great grandfather's younger brother was in the army during WWl--in the British army. He was a member of the 5th Wiltshires, was a survivor of Gallipoli, but died in Iraq in 1917. He's buried in the Kut Cemetery right outside Baghdad.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
04-13-2017, 05:50 AM
I have one more--I was thinking of US military service. My great grandfather's younger brother was in the army during WWl--in the British army. He was a member of the 5th Wiltshires, was a survivor of Gallipoli, but died in Iraq in 1917. He's buried in the Kut Cemetery right outside Baghdad.

My father would have been in the same campaign (Mesoptomia/Iraq) as a replacement following South Wales Borderers' losses at Gallipoli. John

C J Wyatt III
04-13-2017, 06:26 AM
When I first got into genealogy and DNA, my intent was on finding the missing link in my paternal line to connect with Rev. Hawte Wyatt of the Jamestown Settlement, and hence back to the two Sir Thomas Wyatt's and Sir Henry Wyatt.

Well, the Y-DNA showed that it was not even close. Looks like I missed it by a haplogroup. My paternal line now appears to be tied in with a Holcomb line, which goes back to Sir John de Holcombe who was knighted by Richard the Lion Hearted during the Third Crusade.

I recall seeing a member here who had a paternal line ancestor that fought under Saladin. Our paternal line ancestors probably faced each other in battle over eight hundred years ago.

Jack Wyatt

geebee
04-13-2017, 08:00 AM
The maternal grandfather of my wife's paternal grandmother was Allen Levi Weaks. Weaks was a private in the Confederate army. He had the misfortune of being at Fort Donelson when it was captured by Union forces under the command of then-Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant. He thereupon became a prisoner of war, along with about 12,000 others.

Also during the American Civil War, my maternal grandmother's paternal grandfather served with the 5th Regiment of the European Brigade (Spanish Regiment). This was part of the Louisiana Militia, and it seems that the principal "engagement" of this unit during the war came when Union forces were about to take over the City of New Orleans. Mainly, they served to maintain order -- for one thing, preventing the city from being burned by those who believed it would be better to destroy the city than surrender it.

My paternal grandfather's paternal grandfather, George Washington Bookhammer, served in the 184th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry of the Union Army. I don't know which of these battles my great, great grandfather actually participated in, but the 184th were in


Battle of Totopotomoy Creek
Battle of Cold Harbor
Siege of Petersburg
Second Battle of Petersburg
First Battle of Deep Bottom
Second Battle of Deep Bottom
Second Battle of Ream's Station
Battle of Boydton Plank Road
Battle of Hatcher's Run
Appomattox Campaign
Battle of White Oak Road
Battle of Sutherland's Station
Battle of Sailor's Creek
Battle of High Bridge
Battle of Appomattox Court House

In addition to the above, my father's paternal grandfather George Washington Bookhammer II was said to have been with Black Jack Pershing on the Pancho Villa Expedition, and my mother's maternal grandfather Emile Joseph Pons was in the Spanish American War. (In the latter case, I actually have his pension file.)

Mixed
04-13-2017, 11:42 AM
Both my grandfathers served in World War Two with the U.S. I know one of them was involved in D Day and the other one ended up in Berlin. I have another ancestor who died in the Battle of Berlin as he served in the Waffen SS division Charlemagne. I had a Russian ancestor die in Moldova. I had five others perish at the Battle of Moscow. Their families still don't know what became of them as they believe they were buried in mass graves. I have a couple Finnish ancestors who fought in the Winter and Continuation wars but don't know specifics. My father was a U.S. Marine in Vietnam. The first pic is my Russian ancestor. My grandfather the second. My father the third. My Finnish cousin in the fourth. I served in the 1st Gulf wars in the battles of 73 Easting and Norfolk.

MikeWhalen
04-13-2017, 02:20 PM
The oldest known involvement of my ancestors in War/battle was from my mothers side, the Rowsells. They were from the Devonshire area of England and one of them got caught up in 'The Monmouth rebellion' that ended in 1685

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monmouth_Rebellion

"The Monmouth Rebellion, also known as The Revolt of the West or The West Country rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow James II, the Duke of York who had become King of England, Scotland, and Ireland upon the death of his elder brother Charles II on 6 February 1685."

I found it fascinating to see how the 'followers' of Monmouth were described...."Monmouth landed at Lyme Regis on 11 June 1685. In the following few weeks, his growing army of nonconformists, artisans, and farm workers fought a series of skirmishes with local militias and regular soldiers commanded by Louis de Duras, 2nd Earl of Feversham, and John Churchill, who later became the Duke of Marlborough.

Lol, how did they think it was going to work out...non conformists, artisan's and farmers...I have no clue what my Rowsell was, although the family generally tended to be part of the big fishing fleet based in that area and had made Newfoundland, Canada to be their own summer camp and favorite fishing hole.

In any case, the rebellion was defeated and I was able to actually find a document that specifically mentioned him as part of 100 'traitors' that were 'given' to the Queens Ladies in Waiting to be sold as slaves to various Caribbean plantations. The Ladies in Waiting shared the money, a rather good example of the corruption of the day, as the funds were supposed to go to the Crown/government. My ancestor was then a slave on a plantation, in Jamaica I think. Family legend had him marrying a local girl who was black. They had 3 boys. Several years later, William of Orange overthrew King James 2 in a coup d'état and all of his supporters who had been sentenced to 'transportation' were pardoned and many came back to England

As a finish to the story, family legend has the boys were mistreated when they got back to England due to their 'mixed race' and all 3 eventually moved to Newfoundland and the Bona Vista Bay area. One was a teacher, I'm not sure what the other two were, farmers/hunters/fishermen it sounds like. At the time, the native population, the Beothuk was under serious pressure and started to resist/attack the European settlements. One of the brothers apparently insisted on fishing for salmon in a river the Natives had declared off limits. After various incidents, he was found one day, with his head cut off and mounted on a stake.
The Rowsell brother that was a teacher fled back to England, fearing for his life. The other brother went on a revenge rampage and for the rest of his life hunted down and killed any Indian he found. There is a gravestone of this 'avenging' Rowsell brother in Newfoundland, that some of my close kin today have actually seen, and it says he killed 99 Beothuk in total. In partial support of this family story, I have found mention of this fellow in a book by a Contemporary that gives a general account of what happened, saying that the Rowsell was a trapper and guide and he became a notorious Indian killer because of the murder of his brother

There is even a genuine DNA connection to this story as various testing show I am around 97-98% northern European (British Isles) heritage, but there is a small, but bordering on significant, percentage of 'African' heritage to me, around 2-3 %. It is right on the edge of being considered 'noise', but given the oral family history, I think there is no doubt it is proof of the claim that the 3 Rowsell boys mom was,in fact, black.

On my fathers side, we have one major historical involvement with the military and war, but the details are very unclear. What we know for a fact is Edward Collins, an Irishman from Tipperary County, was awarded 100 acres of land in the Ottawa Valley area of Canada as part of a Veteran's of the War of 1812 land grant program. We have clear documentation of this, and that amount of land corresponds to what the rank of Privates were awarded.

I have never been able to find military records for him specifically, but we know that most of the Vets that got that particular land grand in that particular area, had been with the 100th Regiment of Foot (Prince Regent's County of Dublin Regiment). Not coincidentally, records show most of that regiment had been recruited from the Protestant enclave in the Tipperary region of Ireland

In any case, this Regiment fought well in the War of 1812, Sir Isaac Brock, later a famous General, described them as "The men were principally raised in the north of Ireland, and are nearly all Protestants; they are robust, active, and good looking". The 100th won battle honors for the Capture of Fort Niagra. They also fought in the Battle of Sackett's Harbour, raids to Buffalo and Black Rock, Battle of Chippawa & the Siege of Fort Erie.

I would love to find more info on my Collins and his veterans land grant, as it was a key point in the history of my dads side of the family. In a series of well planned moves, several branches of my family used that land as a starting place for emigrating several dozens of kin to Canada from 1819-1830 (Collins, Whealens, Daggs and Robinsons at least)

Finally, I had 3 Uncles serve in WW2. One was part of a Canadian Highland Regiment, but he was badly injured in England when during a training exercise, a grenade went off in the wrong spot and his leg was badly hurt (other men died).

Another Uncle was a combat engineer with the Canadian 3rd division. They landed in Normandy on D day and then went north, clearing out Holland and the low countries. My Uncle was often under fire, I remember him saying that the 2 jobs they feared the most was laying telegraph/phone lines to the front in the middle of battles, and recovering damaged tanks/vehicles and doing a quick repair so they could get back in the fight immediately. One sad anecdote is that he never celebrated Mothers day after the war because on one Mothers day while in the Low Counties, he woke up one morning and decided to go off to the edge of some woods to shave, hanging his mirror on a tree. All of a sudden, a German artillery barrage opened up on his groups position and many of the guys died when they were caught in the open

My 3rd Uncle served in a different Highland Regiment, but it was assigned to 'home defense' and he was shipped out to British Columbia to defend against a feared Japanese invasion.

My Dad (and Mom) at the time had been living and working in the U.S. for a decade as an organizer for the Lions Club international. After Pearl Harbor, he tried to join the US Marines but even at the age of 30, his advanced case of arthritis caused him to fail the physical. He did become involved in major War Bond drives, and was credited with raising a few million dollars (one time he led a 'sing along' at an event in Madison Square Gardens and solo's onstage for over an hour). I still have the special U. S. military pass my Mom was given to travel separetly up to Alaska to be with him during some of the bond drives.

I have enjoyed reading others stories folks have posted here, and I don't mind saying, I am quite jealous of some of the detailed records folks have of their kin and Military service. It can be a wonderful genealogical find to have such stuff and can often tell you so much more about them.

Mike

Osiris
04-13-2017, 07:01 PM
My gg-grandfather Thomas Thorsen was on the Benton, the flag ship of the Union ironclad fleet, during the Battle of Vicksburg. From his memoir:
Here's my 3rd great greandfather Cyrus McElroy's letter from about the same time. It's fascinating to see the perspective from the other side. Although what's funny is that both of our quotes are actually 1 year before the famous battle of Vicksburg of 1863. I thought Cyrus made it back for that battle but now I'm not sure, maybe it was my other 3rd great grandfather.


We marched along down the banks of the great Father of Waters and saw the gunboats and transports of the enemy in the distance, moving slowly about on the surface of the water.

We soon found that we were not unnoticed by them, for scarcely had we reached town when we heard the roar of cannon from the mortar boats of the enemy and soon a shell came whistling along which burst immediately over our heads. One followed another in quick seccession, and now followed a scene such as I had never witnessed before. Women and children were seen running in every direction bare-footed and bare-headed trying to escape the horrible death that seemed almost inevitable. Fortunately none of us were hurt and we reached camp about dark. For nearly a month we lay upon the banks of the river watching the movements of the enemy.

On the 16th of July occurred the great naval battle between the Confederate ram Arkansas, and the fleet of the enemy. Towards the latter part of July the Federals abandoned the idea of taking Vicksburg and left the place alone.

surbakhunWeesste
04-13-2017, 08:29 PM
My ancestors fought some wack ancient battles - the 1700 onwards and we still have few handed down souvenirs from that time but not sure if I will get it. My grandfathers and relatives fought the Soviets....

rivergirl
04-14-2017, 03:10 AM
Father in Korean War - Royal Australian Navy.

WW2;
No immediate ancestors but many of my mothers cousins served in the War;
1 cousin in the Australian Imperial Forces died of wounds near Lae, buried Lae Cemetery, Papua New Guinea 1945
Another cousin in the AIF missing, presumed death at sea, Timor, believed to have been a POW from Java. being transported when the ship was attacked. 1944, Singapore War Memorial.
A 3rd cousin was a POW in Borneo. He returned home in 1946, died 1949.

My paternal Gt Uncle served in Royal Army Service Corps in North Africa and Italy. He was earlier involved with the evacuation of Dunkirk in 1940.


WW1;
Paternal Gt Grandfather;
Royal Horse Artilery, served in Egypt and Sinai/Palestine.
Battle of Gaza and Beersheba, Fall of Jerusalem.
His brother was a Grenadier Guard on the Western Front 1916 (Somme) to March 1918 (Defence of Ayette) wounded GSW to head.
Many other cousiins and relatives served with the British Army.
My Gt Grandmothers 2 brothers were policemen, who each did a year with the Military Police, 1 in France, 1 in Egypt.

Paternal Grandmothers uncle;
Queens Own Cameron Highlanders.
Battle of Mons. 23-24 Aug 1914.
Rearguard affair of Etreux. 27 Aug 1914.
Battle of the Marne. 7-10 Sep 1914, including the passage of the Petit Morin and the passage of the Marne.
Battle of the Aisne. 12-15 Sep 1914, including the capture of the Aisne Heights including the Chemin des Dames.
Actions of the Aisne Heights. 20 Sep 1914.
Action of Chivy. 26 Sep 1914.
Battle of Langemarck. 21-24 Oct 1914. (Killed in action ~22 Oct 1914.)
Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.
He left a young daughter and a pregnant wife.


Maternal Gt Grandfather
Tunneller with Australian Imperial Forces, at Ypres, May 1917, later at the Belgium coast on the Nieuport Bains sector.
His eldest son was an AIF signalman, gassed at Messine 1917, survived. He was attached to the 2nd Squadron Australian Flying Corps in July 1918.

My maternal grandfather was too young to go to WW1
Many of my grandfathers and grandmothers cousins served with the AIF at Gallipoli 1915 and Western Front 1916-1918, Mouquet Farm, Somme, Baupaume, Messines, Hindenburg line, Ypres etc
1 buried at Beach Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey, GSW to head.
1 buried at Bethleem Farm West Cemetey, Messines, Belguim, buried in the trench when a shell landed near to him.
1 died Baupaume, later re interred Warlencourt British Cemetery, France, killed in action.


1860-1885
Gt Gt Grandfather
2nd (Queens Royal) Regiment of Foot
25 years service with ~10 years in India 1870s, then back to England and Ireland.
No major battles.


I have not researched any military records of my Danish relatives as yet.


"Lest we forget"

deadly77
04-14-2017, 06:28 AM
My Grandfather was in the second World War - artillery gunner on a Bofors gun in France, Belgium and the Netherlands. He was in the Battle of Arnhem. This is a picture taken before he enlisted: 15238

My Great-Grandfather was in the first World War in France. This is the only photo that I have of him: 15237

Going further back, my ggggg-grandfather served in the Royal Navy during the French Revolutionary wars. I found him described as a Greenwich Pensioner in a census entry and that allowed me to trace him back to his Royal Navy service record - first as an ordinary seaman and then as an able seaman where he was at Cape St Vincent on HMS Lively 14 Feb 1797 and Battle of the Nile on HMS Audacious 1 Aug 1798.

Coldmountains
04-15-2017, 01:06 PM
My russian grandfather served in the Red army and fought in Kursk, Stalingrad and Berlin. He was 16 when the war began but faked his passport so that he was not underage and could be conscripted. My ukrainian grand-grandfather fought in both the first and second world war. Another russian grand-grandfather fought in the Soviet-Finish war.

Jenny
04-15-2017, 02:04 PM
All these men were Trasks starting in the Peqout War, French and Indian War, Revolutionary War and Civil War. I'm not that proud, I'm a pacifist.
The interesting thing I know is about Henry Baxter Trask who mustered out of Civil War duty in Houston. He bypassed his first wife and children in Iowa and hightailed it to Minnesota where he married for the second time. Gone are the days when a person could start fresh without govt keeping track (!)

angscoire
04-15-2017, 03:07 PM
A great x2 grandfather fought in WW1 at the Battle of Loos in 1915 , where he was shot in the hand . Returned to service in 1916 - subsequently caught in barbed wire (a much more serious injury than the bullet wound) which saw his service come to an end . Luckily for him this occurred a few weeks before his regiment took part in the Somme offensive .

No other ancestors saw combat in either WW1 or WW2 due to age (either too old , too young or best employed elsewhere) . In WW2 a grandfather and a great grandfather worked for the RAF on the ground.

In the extended family - one great uncle snipped off a toe after his first tour of duty in WW1 to avoid going back - a tactic which succeeded.
In WW2 a 1st cousin once removed died as a POW in Singapore in 1945 , while a 1st cousin twice removed shot himself in Rangoon , Burma, also in 1945.

I know that an Irish great x4 grandfather served around the time of the Napoleonic Wars , although I don't know the details.

C J Wyatt III
04-15-2017, 03:18 PM
All these men were Trasks starting in the Peqout War, French and Indian War, Revolutionary War and Civil War. I'm not that proud, I'm a pacifist.
The interesting thing I know is about Henry Baxter Trask who mustered out of Civil War duty in Houston. He bypassed his first wife and children in Iowa and hightailed it to Minnesota where he married for the second time. Gone are the days when a person could start fresh without govt keeping track (!)

Post American Civil War, I believe there was a shortage of men suitable for marriage. Besides the ones lost through death, many were terribly maimed or were mental basket cases. I would guess there was a rise in bigamy, sometimes with the wives being complicit. Having a part-time husband was better that no husband at all. Just something else to keep in mind when you are doing genetic genealogy.

Jack Wyatt

SwampThing27
04-22-2017, 05:12 PM
Not sure if I've posted in this thread already, but my great great great grandfather was a confederate soldier who died in a Union POW camp, Camp Douglas in Illinois when he was in his 30's. His 13 year old son then joined the confederate army in Alabama during the final year of the war. This young soldier was my great great grandfather, who actually made it into a book that someone wrote about some of the last living confederate soldiers. He ended up living until 1945.

RVBLAKE
04-24-2017, 12:44 PM
Paternal grandfathers in Pequot War, battle at Mystic Fort.
Paternal grandfathers in King Philip's War, battle of Wheeler's Surprise.
Paternal grandfather killed during French & Indian War, outside Albany, NY, soldier in Connecticut Provincial forces. Maternal cousins, French, in Battle of Carillon (Ticonderoga), Fort William Henry, Braddock's Defeat, Battle on Plains of Abraham.
Paternal grandfather & uncle, soldiers in 1st Connecticut Regiment during American Revolution, not sure which battles if any. Paternal grandfather missing presumed killed at Battle of Germantown while member of Connecticut regiment. Several cousins, of Huntingdon family, generals and colonels in Continental Army, Valley Forge, Battle of Yorktown. Maternal cousin, lieutenant in French Army, wounded & captured by British at sea after Siege of Savannah in 1779 Paternal cousin, Benedict Arnold, at Battle of Quebec 1775.
Paternal cousin, of the Arnold family, captain in British Army, killed at Siege of Sebastopol during Crimean War.
One paternal cousin, Ulysses Grant, lieutenant in U. S. Army during Mexican War. A maternal cousin, General Hebert, a lieutenant in Mexican War, later a general in Confederate Army during American Civil War.
Maternal gggrandfather died in Vicksburg in 1864, soldier in Union Army during American Civil War. Paternal cousin, lieutenant in Massachusetts regiment, killed defending Cemetery Ridge July 1864 during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. Maternal cousin, captain in Louisiana regiment, killed leading infantry company up Cemetery Hill at same battle. Paternal cousin, William T. Sherman, commanded infamous March to the Sea in Georgia. Paternal cousin, general in Union Army, killed at Battle of Antietam.
Paternal cousin, Colonel of 11th U. S. Infantry, participated in Red River War, defeat of the Comanche, later Colonel of the 15th U. S. Infantry, helped trap chief Victorio in Mexico during Apache Wars.
Maternal great uncle, a Marine, killed at Battle of Argonne Forest in World War I.
Father, in 3rd U. S. Army, in Battle of the Bulge and other battles of World War II. Two uncles, one a Marine and other in the Army, in the Pacific during World War II.

C J Wyatt III
04-24-2017, 02:49 PM
Not sure if I've posted in this thread already, but my great great great grandfather was a confederate soldier who died in a Union POW camp, Camp Douglas in Illinois when he was in his 30's. His 13 year old son then joined the confederate army in Alabama during the final year of the war. This young soldier was my great great grandfather, who actually made it into a book that someone wrote about some of the last living confederate soldiers. He ended up living until 1945.

Camp Douglas was not very nice. I had two cousins from the 39th Georgia Infantry who were captured in early July 1864 near the Chattahoochee River (Atlanta Campaign). Both succumbed to disease at Camp Douglas before the end of the War.

Jack Wyatt

Dewsloth
04-24-2017, 03:42 PM
Paternal grandfathers in Pequot War, battle at Mystic Fort.
Paternal grandfathers in King Philip's War, battle of Wheeler's Surprise.
Paternal grandfather killed during French & Indian War, outside Albany, NY, soldier in Connecticut Provincial forces. Maternal cousins, French, in Battle of Carillon (Ticonderoga), Fort William Henry, Braddock's Defeat, Battle on Plains of Abraham.
Paternal grandfather & uncle, soldiers in 1st Connecticut Regiment during American Revolution, not sure which battles if any. [...] member of Connecticut regiment. Several cousins, of Huntingdon family, generals and colonels in Continental Army, Valley Forge, Battle of Yorktown.

Any of these surnames sound familiar? Mead, Harrington, Taylor, Alderman, Wilcoxson, Parcett, Hoyt, Finch, Potter, Waterbury, Holmes, Davis, Crosby, Roots, Griffith? My ancestors on those lines started off in MA/CT (Simsbury, Stamford, Hartford, Greenwich in the 1600s) before ending up in VT, and participated in many of the same events. If we aren't actually related, our ancestors probably were at least in close proximity.

kingjohn
04-24-2017, 09:21 PM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_military_history :)

RVBLAKE
04-24-2017, 10:21 PM
No, I don't recognize any of those surnames. My grandfathers in the Pequot War were named Barnes, Hart, Sherman, Munson, Ward, and Sticklin. They were all Connecticut men who were born in England. Sherman is of the same family that produced Gen. William Tecumsah Sherman; Thomas Barnes married a woman, my grandmother, Mary, who was hanged in Farmington, Connecticut in the 1660s as a witch. Her loud claims of innocence were ignored. Rough justice.

BalkanKiwi
04-24-2017, 11:15 PM
Cool thread.

New Zealand Wars

Papaharakeke - 6th great grand father - Papaharakeke, was a warrior within the Ngāpuhi iwi (tribe) who's daughter (my 5th great grandmother) was also adopted by Tāmati Wāka Nene (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C4%81mati_W%C4%81ka_Nene). This is New Zealand's largest iwi who's ancestral land is in Northland of the North Island.

In 1822 Papaharakeke was killed by Tuhourangi (another tribe in Rotorua) at Motutawa Island (in Rotorua) on the encouragement of Te Rauparaha, who wanted revenge for a relative lost during Ngāpuhi's capture of Te Totara pa (hill fort). In 1823 Hongi Hika (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hongi_Hika) launched his war expedition against Te Arawa (main tribe of Rotorua area) to avenge the murders at Motutawa.

World War II

Great grandfather - He started out as a signaler in the 18 NZ Battalion before it changed to an armoured division where he eventually became a 2nd Lieutenant in the 18 New Zealand Armoured Regiment (unit in the 4th New Zealand Armoured Brigade) where he was also an operator and troop sergeant. He commanded Sherman tanks. He fought in Egypt, Libya and Italy and attended Royal Military College, Sandhurst in 1944 as a cadet.

Peninsular War

6th great grandfather - He was stationed at various places along the south coast of England, including Chichester, Canterbury and Arundel, as part of the forces which were there to protect the country against a possible invasion by Napoleon's French army. In August 1808, the British army—including the King's German Legion—landed in Portugal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peninsular_War) under the command of Lieutenant-General Sir Arthur Wellesley.

He fought at the Battle of Talavera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Talavera) on the 27th and 28th of July 1809 in the 4th Queen's Own Hussars (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Queen%27s_Own_Hussars).

He was probably taken as a POW after Wellington ordered the Light Brigade to make a dash for the bridge over the river Tagus at Almaraz, Spain, and was captured on 6th August 1809. After a several hundred mile march to the Briançon in France prison he was remained there until he release in 1814 when Napoleon was defeated. He prisoner entry number was 1728.

He spent 5 years in Briançon prison and returned to the regiment on 14th July 1814.

He was discharged in 1818 with his discharge certificate stating "in consequence of being deaf and worn out with general debility from having been five years in a French prison".

Prussian conflicts

Michael Francis von Lipinski - 3rd great grandfather - He was an officer in the Prussian army, however I have no records of what he was involved in (if anything).

mfp925
04-25-2017, 12:41 AM
15416
My father, Kenneth Molony Palmer (1918 - 1988) volunteered for the New Zealand Air Force shortly after New Zealand declared war on Germany. Following his training he embarked on a ship to Vancouver, traveled by train to the East Coast of Canada and took another ship to England. Following his arrival in England he was stationed at RAF Tangmere which was in Tangmere, 3 miles (5 km) east of Chichester, from which he flew his Spitfire on sorties over France. In May 1942 his aircraft was disabled by canon fire from a Messerschmidt piloted by Adolf Galland, a German Luftwaffe general and flying ace. My father was approximately number 50 of the 104 aerial victories claimed by Galland. Fortunately he survived, although he was captured and spent the rest of the war in various Stalag camps run by the Luftwaffe.
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 01:15 AM
15417
My uncle, Brian Lundius Garlick disappeared with the rest of his flight crew when their Lancaster bomber went down over the North Sea. He is memorialized at the Runnymede Memorial, in Englefield Green, near Egham, Surrey, England. Memorial reads:
Garlick, Sgt. Brian Lundius, 412523. R.N.Z.A.F. 19TH August, 1942. Age 18. Son of Stanley Clyde Garlick and Ada Jeannett Garlick of Otaki, Wellington, New Zealand. Panel 117
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

drobbah
04-25-2017, 01:22 AM
My paternal grandfather's older brother fought in WW2 on the British side.He never made it back home....and we don't know where or how he was buried.

My clan(like many other Northern Somali clans) participated in the Adalite Invasion of Abyssinia under the young general Imam Ahmed in the 16th century.These two wars are the only "wars" my ancestors/relatives fought in.


I do think majority of my male ancestors participated in tribal raiding for livestock and access to grazing lands/wells.

mfp925
04-25-2017, 02:08 AM
15418
My grandfather, Stanley Clyde Garlick, was a medical orderly in World War I. He served in the Gallipoli Campaign and following the withdrawal of the ANZAC troops spent time on the Western Front, where he experienced a gas attack. He returned to New Zealand following hospitalization in England. He died at the age of 74 on May 24, 1964.
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

rivergirl
04-25-2017, 02:10 AM
My paternal grandfather's older brother fought in WW2 on the British side.He never made it back home....and we don't know where or how he was buried.


Have you tried the CWGC website?
http://www.cwgc.org/

mfp925
04-25-2017, 02:31 AM
15419
My great grandfather, John Sharman Molony, joined H.M. 83rd Regiment in 1845 and served in India through the Indian Mutiny of 1857. Subsequently promoted to the rank of Captain, in which capacity he commanded a detachment of troops in the Falkland Islands from 1860 to 1864. According to his obituary, the family went to England before going to the Falklands. "remaining in active service during the Mutiny. He received the medal and clasp, and returned to England as Captain in 1859. The following year he was appointed commanding officer of the troops that were sent to the Falkland Islands." After moving to Canada (in 1864 or 1865), he was appointed to be a Civil Servant in the Military Defence Department in Ottawa, a position he held for over 30 years The family lived in Coaticook for a period of time, after which they settled on a farm in the township of Barnston, where The Major built the family home 'Hylton'.
Amongst the few possessions of John Sharman Molony that the family still has is his campaign war chest-on-chest, which had been carried across the Indian desert on a camel's back.
Obituary
"Major John Sharmon [sic] Molony passed away at his son-in-law's residence Sept. 20 (1914) at the grand old age of 96 years. He was the only son of Dr. M. Molony of Dublin in which city he was born and spent his early years. He was a student of Trinity College, Dublin. After finishing his studies he entered the army as an ensign in H.M. 83rd Regiment in the year 1845 ... in active service during the Mutiny."
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 02:49 AM
Following is an extract concerning the service of my grandfather's brother, William Henry Palmer, who volunteered to fight in the Boer War.

Surname: Palmer
Reg No: 8593
Given Names: William Henry
Rank: Farrier
Unit: North Island Regiment - A Squadron
Contingent: Tenth
County/City: Hobson
Occupation: farmer
Ship: Drayton Grange 14 April 1902
Address: Te Kopuru, Northern Wairoa
Next of Kin: Langford, Mr F. P.
Relationship to Soldier: cousin
Next of Kin Address: Artesian Farm, Te Kopuru, Northern Wairoa

I have in my possession a bayonet and scabbard that belonged to William.
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 02:56 AM
My fifth great grandfather was Captain Christopher Green (circa 1720 - 1 August 1759), who was killed at the Battle of Minden.
The Battle of Minden—or Tho(r)nhausen—was a decisive engagement during the Seven Years' War, fought on 1 August 1759. An Anglo-German army under the overall command of Field Marshal Ferdinand of Brunswick defeated a French army commanded by Marshal of France, Marquis de Contades. Two years prior, the French had launched a successful invasion of Hanover and attempted to impose an unpopular treaty of peace upon the allied nations of Britain, Hanover and Prussia. After a Prussian victory at Rossbach, and under pressure from Frederick the Great and William Pitt, King George II disavowed the treaty. In 1758, the Allies launched a counter-offensive against the French forces and drove them back across the Rhine.

After failing to defeat the French before reinforcements swelled their retreating army, the French launched a fresh offensive, capturing the fortress of Minden on 10 July. Believing Ferdinand's forces to be over-extended, Contades abandoned his strong positions around the Weser and advanced to meet the Allied forces in battle. The decisive action of the battle came when six regiments of British and two of Hanoverian infantry, in line formation, repelled repeated French cavalry attacks; contrary to all fears that the regiments would be broken. The Allied line advanced in the wake of the failed cavalry attack, sending the French army reeling from the field, ending all French designs upon Hanover for the remainder of the year.

In Britain, the victory was considered to constitute the Annus Mirabilis of 1759.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Minden
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 03:08 AM
15420
General Sir Charles Green was my fourth great grand uncle.
Following is an extract from The Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Review, accessible via Google Books
General Sir C. Green, Bart. Lately. At Cheltenham, aged 81,Sir Charles Green, Knight and Baronet, of Milnrow in Yorkshire, a General in the army, and Colonel of the 37th regiment, a member of the Consolidated Board of General Officers, and a Commissioner of the Royal Military College. He was born at Gibraltar, Dec. 18, 1749, the second son of Christopher Green, esq. a Captain in the army, by Britannia, daughter of Charles Hamilton, of Mouaghan,in Ireland, esq. He was appointed Gentleman Cadet in the Royal Artillery 1760,Ensign in the 31st foot 1765, and joined that regiment in the following year at Pensacola in West Florida. In 1768 he was employed under Brig.-Gen. Haldimandin a particular service to New Orleans and the Natches, on the Mississippi; and in 1769 removed with the regiment to St. Augustine in East Florida. He was promoted to a Lieutenancy Nov. 23 that year. In 1771 he was employed as an Engineer in the Bahama islands, and having rejoined the 31st regiment at the latter end of 1772, in the island of St. Vincent, served in the campaign against the revolted Chxribs. He returned to England with the regiment in May 1773, was appointed Adjutant soon after, purchased the Captain-Lieutenancy in 1774, and succeeded to a company in 1775. In 1776 he again accompanied the regiment across the Atlantic, and was present at the action of Trois Riviereson the 8th of June. At the opening of the campaign of 1777 he was appointed Aid-de-camp to Major-Gen. Phillips, the second in command; and was wounded at the action of Freeman's Farm in Sept. Having returned to England in March 1778,Capt. Green was appointed Aid- de-camp to Lieut. Gen. Sir A. Ougbton, Commander-in-chief in North Britain; after whose death, in May 1780, be rejoined the 31st regiment; and in 1781 was appointed Major of brigade to the Montreal district. He was included in the brevet of Majors in 1783, and purchased the Majority of the 31st in 1788. On the breaking out of the war in 1793, he, being then nearly at the head of the list of Majors in the army, was appointed Lieut. Colonel of one of the battalions formed from the independent companies; whence in Feb. 1794 be exchanged to the command of the 30th regiment, with which he proceeded to Corsica in May following, and remained there until 1796, having for the greater part of that time acted as Inspector-general of Corsican troops raised for the British service. In 1796 Lieut. Col. Green was appointed Civil Governor of Grenada; in which office he continued until 1801, when, his sight being much injured by the climate, be received permission to return. He had in the meantime been promoted to the rank of Colonel in Jan. 1797, and Brigadier-General Oct. 1798. Early in 1803 he was appointed Brigadier-General on the staff in Ireland, and commanded in the counties of Tipperary and Kilkenny; and was after wards promoted to the Staff in England, and to command at Dover and Deal. He received the honour of knighthood May 3 that year. In Jan. 1804, he was appointed Colonel of the York light infantry volunteers. In the same month he received orders to proceed immediately to Barbados, to take the temporary command of the troops in the Leeward Islands. He arrived there in March, and, in pursuance of his instructions, sailed in April, in command of an expedition against the Dutch settlement of Surinam, which, after an active series of operations for about nine days, capitulated to the British arms. He remained at Surinam about a year in administration of the civil government; and having obtained leave to return home on account of ill health, was honoured on his arrival with a patent of Baronetcy, dated Dec. 5, 1805. In May 1807, Sir Charles Green was appointed to the command of the garrison at Malta, which he retained until the May following. In Aug. 1808, he was removed to the 16th regiment) in 1809 promoted to the rank of Lieut. General; in March 1812, placed on the Staff, to command the Northern district; in Nov. 1813, removed to the London district; in 1814, appointed Colonel of the 37th foot; and in 1819 advanced to the rank of General. Sir Charles Green was never married, and his Baronetcy has expired with him.
Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Review: Volume 101, Part 2
January 1, 1831
https://play.google.com/store/books
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 03:21 AM
My fourth great grandfather, Christopher Green, was born circa 1750 in Calcutta, Bengal, India. His military career in the Bengal Army spanned almost 40 years, during which he was promoted through the ranks to Major-General, Commandant of the Artillery on the Bengal establishment.
Green, Christopher
*
Cadet:*********************1769
Lieut.-Fireworker************Dec 3, 1771
First-Lieutenant*************June 16, 1774
Capt.-Lieutenant************ Sep 29, 1779
Captain********************July 2, 1782
Major********************* Nov 24, 1786
Lieut.-Colonel***************Mar 1, 1794
Colonel********************April 21, 1800
Major General**************Jan 1, 1800
*
Christopher Green died at Fort William, July 31, 1805
15421

Alphabetical list of the officers of the Bengal army; with the dates of their respective promotion, retirement, resignation, or death ... from... 1760 to ... 1834 inclusive, corrected to ... 1837

by*Dodwell, Edward;*Miles, James Samuel
*
Published*1838
Topics*India. Army,*East India Company
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 04:19 AM
15422
John Nesbit Anderson (1894 - 1968) is my sixth cousin, once removed.

John Nesbit Anderson
Born 15 April 1894 - Died 19 July 1968

SERVICE NUMBER: 34755
FORCE: Army
LAST RANK: Lieutenant Colonel
New Zealand Engineers Training Depot, Maadi
WAR World War II, 1939-1945

FORENAMES: John Nesbit
SURNAME: Anderson
SERVICE NUMBER: 34755
GENDER: Male

Civilian life

DATE OF BIRTH: 15 April 1894
PLACE OF BIRTH: Okaihau, North Auckland, North Island, New Zealand
BIRTH NOTES: Okaihau, North Auckland, New Zealand
OCCUPATION BEFORE ENLISTMENT WW2: County Council engineer
NEXT OF KIN ON EMBARKATION: Mrs C.F. Anderson (wife), Auckland, New Zealand
RELATIONSHIP STATUS: Married

Service

WAR World War II, 1939-1945

CAMPAIGNS
Greece
1941 Crete
North Africa
Italy
FORCE: Army
SERVICE NUMBER: 34755
MILITARY SERVICE
NZ Engineers, 5 Field Park Co.
NZ Engineers, 6 Field Co.
2 New Zealand Division, Engineers

MEDALS AND AWARDS
Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO)
DSO: NZ Gazette, 21 September 1944. Citation: "It was in great measure due to the personal example and inspiring leadership of Major Anderson that the protective minefield was laid before the enemy attack reached the F.D.L.s at Minqar Qaim on 27 July 1942. Despite the intensity of the enemy shelling of his parties and the development of the attack, Major Anderson was to be seen, encouraging his men, and he himself, fusing mines. One truckload of mines had already been exploded by enemy fire, causing many casualties and Major Anderson and his men well knew the risk involved. When mines had to be laid adjacent to a burning ammunition truck, he himself, displaying a total disregard of personal safety, carried mines to the area. Just as this was being completed, he moved a wounded man to safety, and still under particularly heavy and accurate shell fire continued to direct the work to completion."
1939-1945 Star
Africa Star (8th Army clasp)
Italy Star
Defence Medal
War Medal 1939-1945 with oak leaf
New Zealand War Service Medal
Coronation Medal 1953

EMBARKATION DETAILS WW2 Captain
New Zealand Engineers, 19 Army Troop Company
Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force

LAST RANK Lieutenant Colonel
New Zealand Engineers Training Depot, Maadi
15423


Biographical information

Captain of 19 Army Troop Co, NZE, 1940-41.

Officer Commanding (OC) of 5 Field Park Co, NZE, September 1941 - October 1942.

OC 6 Field Co, NZE, October 1942 - August 1943.

Commander Royal Engineers (CRE) of 2 NZ Division, April 1944.

OC of Engineer Training Depot, Maadi, January 1945.

Death

AGE AT DEATH 74
DATE OF DEATH 19 July 1968
PLACE OF DEATH Te Awamutu, Waikato, New Zealand
DEATH NOTES Te Awamutu, Waikato, New Zealand

Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

mfp925
04-25-2017, 05:00 AM
15424

Walter Henry Clark is my fourth cousin, twice removed. He was born on April Fools’ Day 1888 at Paddingham, a hamlet in the village of Winscombe, Somerset, son of Henry Robert Clark, a school master at Sidcot Quaker School.

Walter was brought up in the Quaker Faith and was educated at Sidcot School, as were all his siblings.

He left school in 1905 and initially worked as a designer at Poole Pottery in Dorset for about a year. Walter then moved to London where he worked for various London department stores as an interior designer.*

Walter didn’t join the army immediately war broke out, but on 25th February 1915 he joined the Territorial Force, signing up at the Inns of Court Officers Training Corps (10 Stone Buildings, Lincoln’s Inn, London) for four years’ service. His attestation papers state his religion as Quaker and the oath has been altered from “I, Walter Henry Clark do swear by Almighty God…..” to “I, Walter Henry Clark do solemnly and sincerely affirm…..”. They also give his age as 26 years and 10 months, height as 6’1¾” and his expanded chest measurement as 39” with an expansion of 4”. Eyesight good, physical development good.*
From the end of February until May 1915 Walter was posted to the Inns of Court training school at Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire. In May he was appointed a commission and on 2nd June 1915 he was posted to the 3rd Battalion (Reserve), The Dorset Regiment as a Second Lieutenant. At that time this regiment were stationed at Wyke Regis in Dorset which happened to be where Walter’s maternal grandfather had been born in 1818 and his ancestors had lived prior to that back to at least 1700.

Walter remained in Wyke Regis until December 1915 and during these few months he completed the Chelsea Course at Chelsea Barracks (pass) and the Southern Command School of Musketry Course at Hayling Island (distinction).

On 4th December 1915 Walter was transferred to the 1st Battalion, The Dorset Regiment and that day they sailed for France.*

Walter remained there for several months, until the outbreak of the Battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916.*

On that fateful day when so many were killed, Walter was fighting near Authuille and was injured – a fact that he put down to Pythagorus’s Theorem (his father was a mathematics teacher)! He told the story that there was a British trench and a German trench positioned at right angles to each other. Hand grenades were being thrown by both sides but none reached their target as the distance was too great. Thanks to Mr Pythagorus, Walter moved further down the trench to make the diagonal distance to the target area in the other trench shorter. As he put it, “Unfortunately, they must teach Pythagorus in Germany too and the Germans learn more quickly!!” So, he was caught by a lot of shrapnel in his arms and hands and also received a bullet wound to the face. Walter was lucky in that none of his injuries were serious, though the injuries to his hands (nerve and circulatory damage) did affect his work for the rest of his life, but he said the bullet wound to his face vastly improved his appearance!

Walter was sent back to the UK in the second week of July, to the London Hospital to be patched up. He was eventually returned to service, this time with the 3rd Battalion, The Dorset Regiment, on 4th November 1916.

The next year, from November 1916, was spent with the 3rd Battalion at Wyke Regis. During the first three or four months of this period Walter completed various courses: Lewis Gun, Hotchkiss Machine Gun and Range Finding training at Hayling Island and a Revolver Course at Wareham, Dorset. These were all passed with 1st Class. From March to November 1916 Walter held the position of Musketry Officer at Wyke Regis Camp. Also during this time he was promoted from Second Lieutenant to Lieutenant on 1st July 1917.*
On 8th November 1917 Walter married Winifred Maynard at All Saint’s Church, Wyke Regis. They married there, rather than in her home town of Twickenham, because Walter could not get away as he was awaiting orders to be posted overseas again. On 17th November he went back to France, this time with the 5th Battalion of the Dorset Regiment.*

Walter returned to Wyke Regis on 18th January 1918, at which point he was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. Next came some more training, this time at Grantham Lincs., where he passed a three month Vickers Machine Gun course on 2nd May 1918.*

A few days later he was transferred again, this time to the 32nd Battalion, the Machine Gun Corps and they were posted to France. Walter spent the first month at Camiers, passing a further Vickers Machine Gun course.*
According to several sources in his army papers, personal papers etc Walter remained in France from May 1918 until May 1919 with the 32nd Battalion, the Machine Gun Corps. *

Walter returned to England on 2nd May 1919 and was demobbed on 21st May just ten days before his brother, Clifford died of pneumonia in Cologne, Germany whilst still serving with the Army of Occupation. So, happiness turned to sorrow and there was more sadness when, following the news of the death of her brother-in-law, Winifred went into early labour and lost her baby, her only son.*

So, back to civvy street and Walter needed a job. However, there was a problem in that his injuries had affected the use of his right hand, leaving it slightly paralysed in the fingers and unable to be fully opened because of tendon damage; not good for someone who earned their living from drawing and painting.

A lengthy correspondence with the War Office ensued, and eventually Walter was awarded a pension of £16 10s 4d per annum based on a 20% disability. This sum increased to £47 4s by 1952.

Walter returned to the world of interior design for a few years, but by 1923 he decided to retrain as an architect. His first job was as architect to the Cyprus Asbestos Company, which meant Walter and his family moving to Cyprus for five years which was easier on his remaining injuries and the warm climate eased the mild pain he suffered.

Years later, he would sit at his desk in his office in Holborn, London, with a small toaster on the table to warm his hands as the circulation through his fingers was very poor.

Walter continued working as an architect in London until he was 70 years of age. He was self-employed and, despite a second spell in the army for the duration of WW2 when he was garrison engineer for Bulford Army Camp on Salisbury Plain, he had not contributed sufficiently for an Old Age Pension until 1958.

He then retired and moved to Adderbury in Oxfordshire, where his grandmother, Mary Buck, had lived years before. Though he enjoyed his retirement years, he never really stopped working and could be found in his spare bedroom 'office', drawing, painting and planning new projects right up until the day he died in 1965.

So, an ordinary war maybe, with far less suffering than so many others endured, yet the effects of Walter’s service were still evident for the best part of fifty years.

mfp925
04-25-2017, 05:12 AM
15425
Donald Arthur Anderson (1884 - 1916) is my sixth cousin, once removed. He was killed in action in the Somme Valley on Sept 17, 1916. He is buried in theCaterpillar Valley Cemetery at Longueval, Somme, France.

mfp925
04-25-2017, 05:17 AM
Allan Bertram Anderson is my sixth cousin, once removed.
Son of Donald McIntyre Anderson and Fanny Nesbit Anderson, of Marangai.

Enlisted with rank of trooper and posted to 11th (North Auckland) Squadron, Auckland Mounted Rifles Regiment, Kawakawa, 18 August 1914.
Promoted to rank of corporal, 28 August 1914.
Proceeded overseas from Wellington on board HMNZT 'Star of India', 16 October 1914.
Disembarked Alexandria, Egypt, and entrained for Zeitoun Camp near Cairo, 3 December 1914.
Transferred to New Zealand Field Artillery and assigned new regimental number 2/519a, 3 March 1915.
Reverts to rank of gunner, 21 November 1915.

Transferred to 15th (Howitzer) Battery, 1st Brigade, New Zealand Field Artillery, Egypt, 16 March 1916.
Appointed to position of saddler, Divisional Ammunition Column, France, 1 May 1916.
Attached to New Zealand Infantry and General Base Depot, Etaples, France, pending return to New Zealand on Duty Furlough, 15 November 1917. Ceased attachment to New Zealand Infantry and General Base Depot and proceeded overseas to England, 22 November 1917. Reported for duty to New Zealand Discharge Depot, Torquay, England, 6 December 1917.
Commenced return to New Zealand from Plymouth, England, on board HMNZT 'Tainui', 1 February 1918.
Disembarked in Wellington, New Zealand, 15 March 1918.
Reported for duty and transferred to BRT[?] Artillery Detail, Featherston Camp, Wairarapa, 4 November 1918.
Died at Featherston Camp Military Hospital, 26 November 1918 (bronchial pneumonia).

Parents: Donald McIntyre Anderson and Fanny Nesbit Anderson, Marangai*
http://www.aucklandmuseum.com/war-memorial/online-cenotaph/record/C249

mfp925
04-25-2017, 05:49 AM
My fourth great grandfather, Major-General Christopher Green, was a talented artist, as evidenced by the drawing below:
15427

Dancing girls and musicians from Madras, a drawing by Christopher Green
Original is owned by the British Library

mfp925
04-25-2017, 05:59 AM
Major General Christopher Green married Anne Fortnom February 25, 1786 in Calcutta, Bengal, India.
Anne was the youngest sister of Colonel John Fortnom, who is depicted in the magnificent painting by the artist Tilly Kettle.
15428
John Fortnom, his wife Jane Yeates and their three oldest children, Jane, John and Cordelia.
I especially like the little chap's pose, with his clenched fists and assertive stance!

mfp925
04-25-2017, 06:46 AM
15429
Hone Heke was a famous Maori worrior who fought against the colonial forces in the early era of European settlement.

Following his return to New Zealand at the end of World War II my father was employed by the Lands and Survey Department of the New Zealand Government as a farmer and land developer. In 1947/48 he was appointed manager of a large development block that was subsequently divided into four farms, one of which he subsequently purchased. Our family farm was named "Tangmere" and is situated at the top end of the Pongakawa Valley, in the central North Island. During clearing operations my father found various Maori artifacts, including a stone axe head. According to my mother, who turned 90 last month, "Hongi's Track" traversed our farm, prior to its development.

Following is the Wikipedia article on Hongi Heke:
Hōne Wiremu Heke Pōkai (c. 1807/1808 – 7 August 1850), born Heke Pōkai and later often referred to as Hōne Heke, was a highly influential Māori rangatira (chief) of the Ngāpuhi iwi (tribe) and a war leader in northern New Zealand; he was affiliated with the Ngati Rahiri, Ngai Tawake, Ngati Tautahi, Te Matarahurahu and Te Uri-o-Hua hapu (subtribes) of Ngāpuhi.[1] Hōne Heke fought with Hongi Hika, an earlier war leader of the Ngāpuhi, in the Musket Wars. Hōne Heke is considered the principal instigator of the Flagstaff War in 1845–46.

Biography
He was born at Pakaraka, south of Kerikeri in the Bay of Islands, in 1807 or 1808. His father was Tupanapana and his mother Te Kona. He was named Heke Pōkai, after his mother's brother Pokaia. He grew up in the Kaikohe area. As a youth, he attended the Church Missionary Society school at Kerikeri in 1824 and 1825 and came under the influence of the missionary Henry Williams. Subsequently, he, his first wife Ono (daughter of Te Pahi) and their two infant children were converted to Christianity. He and his wife were baptised on 9 August 1835, Heke Pōkai taking the Christian names Hoani or Hōne and Wiremu, and Ono taking the name Riria (Lydia). Hōne Heke became a lay preacher in the Anglican church. Riria and the children died soon after and Heke married Hariata (Harriet) Rongo, daughter of Hongi Hika, in the Kerikeri chapel on 30 March 1837.

Despite becoming a Christian, it was as a warrior and as a leader of a Māori rebellion that Hōne Heke is best known. He took part in the fighting on the beach at Kororareka in 1830 that is known as the Girls' War. After that fighting he participated in Titore's expedition to Tauranga, and fought with Titore against Whiria (Pōmare II) in 1837.

The Treaty of Waitangi
Conflicting reports survive as to when Heke signed the Treaty of Waitangi. He may have signed with the other chiefs on 6 February 1840, but in any event, he soon found the agreement not to his liking. Among other things, Heke objected to the relocation of the capital to Auckland; moreover the Governor-in-Council imposed a customs tariff on staple articles of trade that resulted in a dramatic fall in the number of whaling ships that visited Kororareka (over 20 whaling ships could anchor in the bay at any time); a reduction in the number of visiting ships caused a serious loss of revenue to Ngāpuhi. Heke and his cousin Titore also collected and divided a levy of £5 on each ship entering the bay. Pomare felt aggrieved that he could no longer collect payment from American whaling and sealing ships that called at Otuihu across from Opua.

The British representative became concerned that Heke and the Ngāpuhi chief Pomare II flew the American Ensign. Heke and Pomare II had listened to Captain William Mayhew, the Acting-Consul for the United States since 1840, and to other Americans talking about the successful revolt of the American colonies against England over the issue of taxation. Heke obtained an American ensign from Henry Green Smith, a storekeeper at Wahapu who had succeeded Mayhew as Acting-Consul. After the flagstaff was cut down for a second time the Stars and Stripes flew from the carved sternpost of Heke's war-canoe. Letters from William Williams record talks he had with Heke, and refer to American traders attempting to undermine the British both before and especially after the signing of the treaty. William Mayhew left New Zealand and Green Smith and Charles Berry Waetford then acted as unofficial American Consuls. They continued in anti-British activities, selling muskets and powder to the disaffected Maori. Waetford was later convicted and imprisoned for gunrunning, but Green Smith successfully escaped New Zealand before the Crown could arrest him.

Bishop Pompallier, who led the Roman Catholic missionaries, had advised several of the leading Catholic chiefs (such as Rewa and Te Kemara) to be very wary in signing the treaty, so it is not surprising that they had spoken out against the treaty. William Colenso, the CMS missionary printer, in his record of the events of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi commented that "[a]fter some little time Te Kemara came towards the table and affixed his sign to the parchment, stating that the Roman Catholic bishop (who had left the meeting before any of the chiefs had signed) had told him not to "write on the paper, for if he did he would be made a slave."

Following the signing of the treaty the British regarded the authority of the chiefs as subservient to that of the Crown; as the governor asserted the rule of law, the presence of government officials and troops had resulted in an end to the free-wheeling lawless situation that had prevailed in the North since the 1820s.

Events leading to the outbreak of the Flagstaff War
Other matters also caused dissatisfaction among Ngāpuhi. One item involved the shifting of the capital of the new colony from Okiato to Auckland in 1841. Auckland had experienced a significant economic boom with the discovery of copper at Kawau island. In 1844/45 the copper was worth 7000 pounds, about a third of Auckland's total exports for that period of time. This resulted in a loss of revenue for the people of the Bay of Islands. Furthermore, the imposition of government customs duties, the temporary ban on the felling of kauri trees, and the government control over the sale of land all contributed to an economic depression for the northern Māori.

The trial and execution of Wiremu Kīngi Maketū in 1842 for murder was, in the opinion of Archdeacon Henry Williams, the beginning of Heke’s antagonism to the colonial administration, as Heke began gathering support among the Ngāpuhi for a rebellion against the colonial administration. However it was not until 1844 that Heke sought the support of Te Ruki Kawiti and other leaders of the Ngāpuhi iwi by the conveying of ‘te ngākau’, the custom observed by those who sought help to settle a tribal grievance.

On 8 July 1844 the flagstaff on Maiki Hill at the north end of Kororareka was cut down for the first time by Heke's ally Te Haratua, the chief of Pakaraka. Heke himself had set out to cut down the flagstaff, but had been persuaded by Archdeacon William Williams not to do so. As a signal of his unhappiness with the British, and encouraged by the American traders, in the space of six months Hōne Heke returned to chop the flagpole down three times. Heke had been strongly influenced by stories of the American War of Independence.

Battle of Kororāreka
The uprising began when the flagpole was cut down for the fourth time at dawn on Tuesday 11 March 1845. A force of about 600 Māori armed with muskets, double-barrelled guns and tomahawks attacked Kororareka. Heke's warriors attacked the guard post, killing all the defenders, and Heke cut down the flagstaff. At the same time, possibly as a diversion, Te Ruki Kawiti and his men attacked the town of Kororareka. The survivors from the 250 soldiers and settlers abandoned the town as HMS Hazard bombarded Heke's warriors with cannon. Heke's men then raided the town taking anything useful they could find. Heke's order that the southern part of Korororeka remain untouched resulted in the Anglican and Catholic churches being undamaged.

Many Māori under the mana of the leading northern rangitira, Tāmati Wāka Nene, stayed loyal to the British government. They took an active part in the fight against Heke and tried to maintain a dialogue with the rebels in an effort to bring peace.

Battle of the sticks
After the attack on Kororareka Heke and Kawiti and the warriors travelled inland to Lake Omapere near to Kaikohe some 20 miles (32 km), or two days travel, from the Bay of Islands. Nene built a pā close to Lake Omapere. Heke's pā named Puketutu, was 2 miles (3.2 km) away, while it is sometimes named as "Te Mawhe" however the hill of that name is some distance to the north-east. In April 1845, during the time that the colonial forces were gathering in the Bay of Islands, the warriors of Heke and Nene fought many skirmishes on the small hill named Taumata-Karamu that was between the two pās, and on open country between Okaihau and Te Ahuahu. Heke's force numbered about three hundred men; Kawiti joined Heke towards the end of April with another hundred and fifty warriors. Opposing Heke and Kawiti were about four hundred warriors that supported Tamati Waka Nene including the chiefs, Makoare Te Taonui and his son Aperahama Taonui, Mohi Tawhai, Arama Karaka Pi and Nōpera Panakareao.

Attack on Heke's Pā at Puketutu
In May 1845 Heke’s Pā at Puketutu (Te Mawhe) was attacked by troops from the 58th, 96th and 99th Regiments with marines and a Congreve rocket unit, under the command of Lt Col William Hulme.

The British troops had no heavy guns but they had brought with them a dozen Congreve rockets. The Māori had never seen rockets used and were anticipating a formidable display. Unfortunately the first two missed their target completely; the third hit the palisade, duly exploded and was seen to have done no damage. This display gave considerable encouragement to the Māori. Soon all the rockets had been expended leaving the palisade intact.

The storming parties began to advance, first crossing a narrow gulley between the lake and the pā. Kawiti and his warriors arrived at the battle and engaged with the Colonial forces in the scrub and gullies around the pā. There followed a savage and confused battle. Eventually the discipline and cohesiveness of the British troops began to prevail and the Māori were driven back inside the pā. But they were by no means beaten, far from it, as without artillery the British had no way to overcome the defences of the pā. Hulme decided to disengage and retreat back to the Bay of Islands.

In the battle, the British suffered 14 killed and 38 wounded. The Māori losses were 47 killed and about 80 wounded.

Battle of Te Ahuahu
After the successful defence of Puketutu (Te Mawhe) Pā on the shores of Lake Omapere, in accordance with Māori custom, the pā was abandoned as blood had been spilt there, so that the place became tapu. Hōne Heke returned to the pā he had built at Te Ahuahu. Tāmati Wāka Nene built a pā at Okaihau in the days that followed that battle at Puketutu (Te Mawhe) Pā, the warriors of Heke Tāmati Wāka Nene fought several minor skirmishes with the warriors of Heke and Kawiti.

The hostilities disrupted the food production and in order to obtain provisions for his warriors, in early June 1845 Heke went to Kaikohe and on to Pakaraka to gather food supplies. During his absence one of Tāmati Wāka Nene's allies, the Hokianga chief, Makoare Te Taonui, attacked and captured Te Ahuahu. This was a tremendous blow to Heke's mana or prestige, obviously it had to be recaptured as soon as possible.

Until the 1980s, histories of the Northern War tend to ignore the poorly documented Battle of Te Ahuahu yet it was the most significant fight of the entire war as it is the only engagement that can be described as a clear victory - not for the British forces - but for Tāmati Wāka Nene and his warriors. However, there are no detailed accounts of the action. It was fought entirely between the Māori warriors on 12 June 1845 near by Te Ahuahu at Pukenui - Hōne Heke and his warriors against Tāmati Wāka Nene and his warriors. As there was no official British involvement in the action there is little mention of the event in contemporary British accounts. Hugh Carleton (1874) mentions

“Heke committed the error (against the advice of Pene Taui) of attacking Walker [Tāmati Wāka Nene], who had advanced to Pukenui. With four hundred men, he attacked about one hundred and fifty of Walker's party, taking them also by surprise; but was beaten back with loss. Kahakaha was killed, Haratua was shot through the lungs.”
The Revd. Richard Davis also recorded that

“a sharp battle was fought on the 12th inst. between the loyal and disaffected natives. The disaffected, although consisting of 500 men, were kept at bay all day, and ultimately driven off the field by the loyalists, although their force did not exceed 100. Three of our people fell, two on the side of the disaffected, and one on the side of the loyalists. When the bodies were brought home, as one of them was a principal chief of great note and bravery, he was laid in state, about a hundred yards from our fence, before he was buried. The troops were in the Bay at the time, and were sent for by Walker, the conquering chief; but they were so tardy in their movements that they did not arrive at the seat of war to commence operations until the 24th inst.!”
At the Battle of Te Ahuahu on 12 June 1845 Nene's warriors carried the day. Heke lost at least 30 warriors and was driven from Te Ahuahu leaving Tāmati Wāka Nene in control of Heke's pā. Haratua recovered from his wound. Heke was severely wounded and did not rejoin the conflict until some months later, at the closing phase of the Battle of Ruapekapeka. After the battle of Te Ahuahu Heke went to Kaikohe to recover from his wounds. He was visited by Henry Williams and Robert Burrows, who hoped to persuade Heke to end the fighting. In a letter to Lieutenant Colonel Despard the battle was described by Tāmati Wāka Nene as a "most complete victory over Heke".

Battle of Ruapekapeka Pā
The siege of Ruapekapeka began on 27 December 1845 and continued until 11 January 1846. This pā had been constructed by Te Ruki Kawiti to apply, and improve on, the defensive design used at Ohaeawai Pā; the external palisades at Ruapekapeka Pā provided a defence against cannon and musket fire and a barrier to attempted assaults on the pā.

Over two weeks, the British bombarded the pā with cannon fire until the external palisades were breached on 10 January 1846. On Sunday, 11 January Tāmati Wāka Nene's men discovered that the pā appeared to have been abandoned; although Te Ruki Kawiti and a few of his followers remained behind, and appeared to have been caught unaware by the British assault. An assaulting force drove Kawiti and his warriors out of the pā. Fighting took place behind the pā and most casualties occurred in this phase of the battle.

It was later suggested that most of the Māori had been at church as many of them were devout Christians. Knowing that their enemy, the British, were also Christians they had not expected an attack on a Sunday. The Revd. Richard Davis noted in his diary of 14 January 1846

“Yesterday the news came that the Pa was taken on Sunday by the sailors, and that twelve Europeans were killed and thirty wounded. The native loss uncertain. It appears the natives did not expect fighting on the Sabbath, and were, the great part of them, out of the Pa, smoking and playing. It is also reported that the troops were assembling for service. The tars, having made a tolerable breach with their cannon on Saturday, took the opportunity of the careless position of the natives, and went into the Pa, but did not get possession without much hard fighting, hand to hand.”
However, later commentators cast doubt as to this explanation of the events of Sunday, 11 January as fighting continued on Sunday at the Battle of Ohaeawai. Another explanation provided by later commentators is that Heke deliberately abandoned the pā to lay a trap in the surrounding bush as this would provide cover and give Heke a considerable advantage. If this is the correct explanation, then the Heke's ambush was only partially successful, as Kawiti's men, fearing their chief had fallen, returned towards the pā and the British forces engaged in battle with the Māori rebels immediately behind the pā.

In any event after four hours of battle, the Māori rebels withdrew. The British forces, left in occupation of the pā, proclaimed a victory.

The end of the Flagstaff War
Shortly after Ruapekapeka, Heke and Kawiti met their principal Māori opponent, the loyalist chief, Tāmati Wāka Nene, and agreed upon peace. Nene went to Auckland to tell the governor that peace had been won; with Nene insisting that the British accept the terms of Kawiti and Heke that they were to be unconditionally pardoned for their rebellion.

The governor, George Grey presented the end of the rebellion as a British victory. Grey had no respect for the political stance that Heke assumed "I cannot discover that the rebels have a single grievance to complain of which would in any degree extenuate their present conduct and. . . I believe that it arises from an irrational contempt of the powers of Great Britain." Despite this, Heke and George Grey were reconciled at a meeting in 1848.

The legacy of Hōne Heke
The ingenious design of the Ohaeawai Pā and the Ruapekapeka Pā became known to other Māori tribes. These designs were the basis of what is now called the gunfighter pā that were built during the later New Zealand Wars. The capture of Ruapekapeka Pā can be considered a British tactical victory, but it was purpose-built as a target for the British, and its loss was not damaging; Heke and Kawiti managed to escape with their forces intact.

It is clear that Kawiti and Heke made considerable gains from the war, despite the British victory at Ruapekapeka. After the war's conclusion, Heke enjoyed a considerable surge in prestige and authority. The missionary Richard Davis, writing on 28 August 1846, stated that "amongst his countrymen, as a patriot, he has raised himself to the very pinnacle of honour, and is much respected wherever he goes".

Following the conflict Hōne Heke retired to Kaikohe. There, two years later, he died of tuberculosis on 7 August 1850. The Rev. Richard Davis performed a Christian ceremony and then his second wife Hariata Rongo (a daughter of Hongi Hika) and other followers who had been his bodyguards for many years, took his body to a cave near Pakaraka, called Umakitera. In April 2011 it was announced by David Rankin, (of Te Matarahurahu hapu (subtribe) of the Ngāpuhi and the Hōne Heke Foundation), that the bones of Hōne Heke would be moved and buried at a public cemetery, as the land near the cave was being developed, and in May 2011 he supervised the move; although some Ngāpuhi questioned his right to do so.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C5%8Dne_Heke

MitchellSince1893
04-26-2017, 05:52 AM
My fourth great grandfather, Christopher Green, was born circa 1750 in Calcutta, Bengal, India. His military career in the Bengal Army spanned almost 40 years, during which he was promoted through the ranks to Major-General, Commandant of the Artillery on the Bengal establishment.
Green, Christopher
*
Cadet:*********************1769
Lieut.-Fireworker************Dec 3, 1771
First-Lieutenant*************June 16, 1774
Capt.-Lieutenant************ Sep 29, 1779
Captain********************July 2, 1782
Major********************* Nov 24, 1786
Lieut.-Colonel***************Mar 1, 1794
Colonel********************April 21, 1800
Major General**************Jan 1, 1800
*
Christopher Green died at Fort William, July 31, 1805
15421

Alphabetical list of the officers of the Bengal army; with the dates of their respective promotion, retirement, resignation, or death ... from... 1760 to ... 1834 inclusive, corrected to ... 1837

by*Dodwell, Edward;*Miles, James Samuel
*
Published*1838
Topics*India. Army,*East India Company
Michael Palmer
Pleasanton, CA
[email protected]

You and I are related as I too descend from Christopher Green (1748-1805). He was my 6th great grandfather. I descend from his daughter Anne Green. See my post here where I also discuss him http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?10274-Battles-your-ancestors-fought-in&p=226448&viewfull=1#post226448

Afshar
04-26-2017, 06:08 AM
My gg-grandfather fought the russians in WWI. He was wounded and taken hostage.

baqara3
04-26-2017, 01:19 PM
my maternal g-g-grandfather was a Infantry lieutenant of the Ottoman Imperial Army during WW1. He was killed shortly before the First World War ended. A high-quality "Iron Crescent" is left from him. He is the man in the centre, surrounded by allied German military staff.
15440
15443

Rukha
04-26-2017, 10:45 PM
Relatives from both sides of my family fought the Soviets. Members of my mother's tribe and Tajiks from my father's region also played a prominent role in the Anglo-Afghan wars. Perhaps my paternal ancestors fought in the Battle of Parwan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Parwan) but that was a while ago so I cannot confirm it!

Kaşmius
04-27-2017, 01:02 AM
Hundreds. Mongols, Greeks, other Indo-Iranics, etc.