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View Full Version : Homo Naledi 300k-200k years old



epoch
04-26-2017, 03:44 PM
This is really interesting. Homo Naledi appears to be about 200,000 to 300,000 years old. That means that DNA extraction is a small possibility.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39710315


Researchers have already attempted to extract DNA from the remains to gain more information about naledi's place in the human evolutionary tree. However, they have not yet been successful.

"[The remains] are obviously at an age where we have every reason to think there might be some chance. The cave is relatively warm compared to the cold caves in northern Europe and Asia where we have really good DNA preservation," said Prof Hawks.

But even if DNA cannot be extracted we have some seriously interesting facts now. We have Sima de los Huesos, roughly of the same time (300,000-400,000 ya) of which DNA has determined they are proto-Neanderthals. We 100,000 years old Denisova in the Altai. We know for sure that east of the Wallace line we have Homo Floriensis because dates range from 700,000 ya to 50,000 ya.

So would this be enough to state that Anatomical Modern Humans were absent in South-Africa? We know Africans show admixture from archaics. Are these the ones that caused it? The only known old African AMH finds are from Ethiopia, I recall. Although John Hawks mentioned that the rise tool exchange over long distances clearly points to a large change in large parts of Africa.

Kelso
04-26-2017, 11:53 PM
Boy.... if they could find a good piece of the Petrous part of the temporal bone to DNA test!

Judith
04-27-2017, 06:51 AM
Lee Berger is a bit of a showman and likes lots of headlines. He has done good science and I like his use of social media to inform us the public but his statements have to be taken with a bucketful of salt not a pinch!
I look forward to the dating in a peer reviewed journal. I am not able to judge whether the team have done things properly. Even with every good intent things can be misinterpreted on dating e.g. Homo florensis