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sgdavies@hotmail.com
05-23-2017, 09:53 AM
There is a New Maternal Haplogroup report available on 23andme. Looks pretty good, and much more specific.

16236

MindHive
05-23-2017, 01:25 PM
They need to do a serious ancestry composition update tbh. Its been a while since any major updates. The MtDNA diagram is nice though.

geebee
05-23-2017, 03:38 PM
Well, it may be more specific for some -- but it isn't for me. It still says H1, and that's because they don't test an adequate number of SNPs.

23andMe says that 1 in 17 of their customers is in this haplogroup, which makes it pretty useless for genealogy.

However, at Family Tree DNA -- using their FGS test -- I'm in H1bg. At this level, instead of being in a group of 59,000, I'm in a group of seven. Of these seven, two have a genetic distance from me of three; two have a GD of two; one has a GD of one; and two have a GD of zero.

Only the two with a GD of zero are actually related to me in any meaningful way. One of them lists the same woman I do as his "earliest known [mtDNA] ancestor", while the other lists a daughter of the same woman.

Still, there probably are people for whom 23andMe will be adequate for mtDNA, as well as autosomal. (But not the Y, probably ever.) It's just that without an FGS test, you can't really know for sure.

Dewsloth
05-23-2017, 03:44 PM
There is a New Maternal Haplogroup report available on 23andme. Looks pretty good, and much more specific.

16236

Awesome! That's the most specific J2a1 report I've seen on a commercial website. Was there any more written below on subclades like J2a1a1?

sgdavies@hotmail.com
05-23-2017, 07:20 PM
Awesome! That's the most specific J2a1 report I've seen on a commercial website. Was there any more written below on subclades like J2a1a1?

Angles, Saxons, and Jutes
J2A
Copenhagen, Denmark.
Today, J2a can be found among about 4% of people living in Denmark and northern Germany. It is also found in England and parts of Scotland, where the haplogroup is thought to have entered with Jute and Saxon invaders during the 5th and 6th centuries AD. In fact, scientists have recently been able to extract DNA from Anglo-Saxon skeletons buried in English cemeteries from the 5th to 7th centuries AD. Analyses of those samples indicate that haplogroup J was at least as common in medieval English populations as it is today. But like the Anglo-Saxons themselves the J2a haplogroup never reached more remote parts of Britain such as highland Scotland and Wales, where Celtic-speaking populations have persisted into modern times.

***although it's wrong it didn't get to the Celtic areas, as most of mine spoke a Celtic languages even beginning of 20th Century.****


Your maternal haplogroup, J2a1a, traces back to a woman who lived approximately 13,000 years ago.

That's nearly 520 generations ago! What happened between then and now? As researchers and citizen scientists discover more about your haplogroup, new details may be added to the story of your maternal line.

J2a1a
Today
J2a1a is relatively common among 23andMe customers.

Today, you share your haplogroup with all the maternal-line descendants of the common ancestor of J2a1a, including other 23andMe customers.