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PLogan
05-23-2017, 01:09 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/05/22/europe-birthplace-mankind-not-africa-scientists-find/

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177127


The history of human evolution has been rewritten after scientists discovered that Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa.

Currently, most experts believe that our human lineage split from apes around seven million years ago in central Africa, where hominids remained for the next five million years before venturing further afield.

But two fossils of an ape-like creature which had human-like teeth have been found in Bulgaria and Greece, dating to 7.2 million years ago.

The discovery of the creature, named Graecopithecus freybergi, and nicknameded ‘El Graeco' by scientists, proves our ancestors were already starting to evolve in Europe 200,000 years before the earliest African hominid.

An international team of researchers say the findings entirely change the beginning of human history and place the last common ancestor of both chimpanzees and humans - the so-called Missing Link - in the Mediterranean region.

parasar
05-23-2017, 03:45 PM
Also related:

Messinian age and savannah environment of the possible hominin Graecopithecus from Europe
Böhme et al.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177347
"Dating fossil hominids and reconstructing their environments is critically important for understanding human evolution. Here we date the potentially oldest hominin, Graecopithecus freybergi from Europe and constrain the environmental conditions under which it thrived. For the Graecopithecus-bearing Pikermi Formation of Attica/Greece, a saline aeolian dust deposit of North African (Sahara) provenance, we obtain an age of 7.37–7.11 Ma, which is coeval with a dramatic cooling in the Mediterranean region at the Tortonian-Messinian transition. Palaeobotanic proxies demonstrate C4-grass dominated wooded grassland-to-woodland habitats of a savannah biome for the Pikermi Formation. Faunal turnover at the Tortonian-Messinian transition led to the spread of new mammalian taxa along with Graecopithecus into Europe. The type mandible of G. freybergi from Pyrgos (7.175 Ma) and the single tooth (7.24 Ma) from Azmaka (Bulgaria) represent the first hominids of Messinian age from continental Europe. Our results suggest that major splits in the hominid family occurred outside Africa."

Tolan
05-23-2017, 03:50 PM
This depends on what is considered "mankind"!

I consider that "mankind" only concerns our species, homos-sapiens, not monkeys of 7 or 8 million years ago.
For me, Africa continues to be the birthplace of mankind.

There were already many indications that the ancient origin of pre-humans was not African.
Rather Asian.
So maybe Euroasian now?

Jean M
05-23-2017, 08:36 PM
Europe was the birthplace of mankind, not Africa, scientists find

Just another media misunderstanding, or (frankly) deliberate creation of an eye-catching headline designed to appeal to European readers. :(

There were a number of waves of hominins out of Africa, before Homo sapiens, for example the ancestors of the Neanderthals. Homo sapiens did not descend from any of them. Our species has its own distinct branch that evolved in Africa.

Nothing to see here really.

homosapien
05-24-2017, 02:34 AM
This depends on what is considered "mankind"!

I consider that "mankind" only concerns our species, homos-sapiens, not monkeys of 7 or 8 million years ago.
For me, Africa continues to be the birthplace of mankind.

There were already many indications that the ancient origin of pre-humans was not African.
Rather Asian.
So maybe Euroasian now?

There was a supposed homo sapiens in Central India during middle to late Pleistocene. 500kya to 300kya. Which would be the earliest and first homo sapiens fossil.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1776655


In 1982 a fossil hominid calvaria was found in a middle Pleistocene deposit in the central Narmada valley of Madhya Pradesh, India, and was assigned to the new taxon Homo erectus narmadensis. Subsequently, morphometric studies of the specimen were conducted by two separate research teams from France and the United States, both in collaboration with Indian colleagues. Results of the most recent study, which includes morphometric and comparative investigations, lead to the conclusion that "Narmada Man" is appropriately identified as Homo sapiens. While the calvaria shares some anatomical features with Asian Homo erectus specimens, it exhibits a broader suite of morphological and mensural characteristics suggesting affinities with early Homo sapiens fossils from Asia, Europe, and Africa as well as demonstrating that the Narmada calvaria possesses some unique anatomical features, perhaps because the specimen reflects the incoherent classificatory condition of the genus Homo.

If would be really hard to find any other fossil with anatomically so perfect a skull resembling modern humans from the time period of mid to late Pleistocene , who are supposed to have colonized the world starting 60kya-50kya.

16242

So there possibly is more to the human history than we know or do not know. I like to keep an open mind.