PDA

View Full Version : Is my 22% Scandinavian more likely British or German?.



Ron from PA
05-29-2017, 09:04 PM
They give me 43% British which is possible but on the high end of what my paper trail would suggest. They give me 21% Europe West which is way to low. Based on paper trail i'd expect a minimum 55-60%. They do give me the 22% Scandinavian. I have most of my lines back to the 1700's some further, no Scandinavian. So would this be even more British?, or is this where most of my missing German is?. My first result with them gave me 71% Scandinavian.

I'm colonial Pennsylvania mainly PA Dutch three grandparents have German surnames one surname is Ulster Scot. Each line has varying degrees of English starting in the 1800's with a couple of Scottish names likely southern Scotland for good measure.

sktibo
05-29-2017, 09:09 PM
They give me 43% British which is possible but on the high end of what my paper trail would suggest. They give me 21% Europe West which is way to low. Based on paper trail i'd expect a minimum 55-60%. They do give me the 22% Scandinavian. I have most of my lines back to the 1700's some further, no Scandinavian. So would this be even more British?, or is this where most of my missing German is?. My first result with them gave me 71% Scandinavian.

I'm colonial Pennsylvania mainly PA Dutch three grandparents have German surnames one surname is Ulster Scot. Each line has varying degrees of English starting in the 1800's with a couple of Scottish names likely southern Scotland for good measure.

It's German.. Your British is likely part German too, I made a thread about ancestry's categories in which Britain is specifically seen breaking into Ireland and Scandinavia when people test twice. I'm pretty darn sure Ancestry's Scandinavian category is more Germanic than purely Scandinavian. I think most Germans come out as a mixture of Scand, GB, EW, and Europe East. For NW Europeans, the Irish and West Scottish excluded, ancestry's ethnicity estimates are just garbage IMO. Your results don't look un-German to me.

To be fair to ancestry, I think it's a fine test for those who aren't of NW European background, (again the Irish are excluded) the problem seems to be that EW and GB are both heavily admixed categories and so they end up creating more problems than they solve as strange amounts of ethnic percentages get assigned to them for those who have them in their results. I think the test would be better if Europe West and Great Britain were both removed.

firemonkey
05-29-2017, 09:53 PM
I think the test would be better if Europe West and Great Britain were both removed.

What would you replace them with ?

Hayden
05-29-2017, 10:04 PM
They give me 43% British which is possible but on the high end of what my paper trail would suggest. They give me 21% Europe West which is way to low. Based on paper trail i'd expect a minimum 55-60%. They do give me the 22% Scandinavian. I have most of my lines back to the 1700's some further, no Scandinavian. So would this be even more British?, or is this where most of my missing German is?. My first result with them gave me 71% Scandinavian.

I'm colonial Pennsylvania mainly PA Dutch three grandparents have German surnames one surname is Ulster Scot. Each line has varying degrees of English starting in the 1800's with a couple of Scottish names likely southern Scotland for good measure.

Looks eerily similar to how my fathers test skewed.

sktibo
05-29-2017, 10:40 PM
What would you replace them with ?

Nothing, their removal would allow us to see our percentages in terms of Ireland (aka NW insular europe, likely reflecting a Bell Beaker percentage) and Scandinavia which likely represents Germanic peoples. It would be confusing to the general public but it would be more useful for us DNA junkies, of course it wouldn't make much sense from a business perspective to make this change

firemonkey
05-30-2017, 01:53 AM
Nothing, their removal would allow us to see our percentages in terms of Ireland (aka NW insular europe, likely reflecting a Bell Beaker percentage) and Scandinavia which likely represents Germanic peoples. It would be confusing to the general public but it would be more useful for us DNA junkies, of course it wouldn't make much sense from a business perspective to make this change

So what you'd propose is catering for the elitist 'dna junkies' and ignoring the less advanced users(like me). Perhaps ' dna junkies' should band together and form a company catering for their particular needs. Lots of very able minds when it comes to dna here who no doubt would fit the bill as advisers .

JerryS.
05-30-2017, 03:18 AM
Ancestry DNA .com is target focused on America where most are British Isles, Scandinavian, German..... so the tests and population samples are slanted that way.

sktibo
05-30-2017, 04:38 AM
So what you'd propose is catering for the elitist 'dna junkies' and ignoring the less advanced users(like me). Perhaps ' dna junkies' should band together and form a company catering for their particular needs. Lots of very able minds when it comes to dna here who no doubt would fit the bill as advisers .

No. This idea of mine would never become a reality as I don't think there would be money in it. I think DNA companies should keep going where the money is as that is what will get more people interested in the hobby and get advancements in the field going. It's just fun to think about the prospect of seeing what our percentages would be if the admixed categories were removed and I think those percentages would be of greater use to us junkies. Of course I do love the idea of a DNA test which is specific to junkie user needs! I just don't think of it as realistic.. maybe one day.

The point of my comment was to illustrate that ancestry's heavily admixed categories often result in a confusing ethnicity estimate for people who get these categories. Anyhow, this is going off topic at this point!

JohnHowellsTyrfro
05-30-2017, 06:23 AM
Ancestry DNA .com is target focused on America where most are British Isles, Scandinavian, German..... so the tests and population samples are slanted that way.

You can tell that by the way they describe British history and origins ( falls about laughing) :) John

palacista
05-30-2017, 08:08 AM
Nothing, their removal would allow us to see our percentages in terms of Ireland (aka NW insular europe, likely reflecting a Bell Beaker percentage) and Scandinavia which likely represents Germanic peoples. It would be confusing to the general public but it would be more useful for us DNA junkies, of course it wouldn't make much sense from a business perspective to make this change

I can see that GB category should go, but I would replace it with English and Insular Celtic categories. There is a small but definite division in the UK between English south & east and 'celtic' west and north. This is clear in autosomal and Y haplogroup testing. This also might prompt testing in the UK. I don't believe that you can identify Irish/NW insular with BB inlight of the recent news.

sktibo
05-30-2017, 08:25 AM
I can see that GB category should go, but I would replace it with English and Insular Celtic categories. There is a small but definite division in the UK between English south & east and 'celtic' west and north. This is clear in autosomal and Y haplogroup testing. This also might prompt testing in the UK. I don't believe that you can identify Irish/NW insular with BB inlight of the recent news.

Comparing Irish with BB is not in light of recent news, that is an idea I got from some of the Irish users on this forum who were able to show me that Irish samples more closely match BB than any other population in Europe today. It's not a perfect match by any means from what I've seen, but I do believe they are the closest. I don't think it's entirely correct to say that there is a definite division in the UK between English S and W and the "Celtic" west and north. Of course, I am not entirely sure I understand precisely what you mean in this regard so I can't be sure that I do disagree with you unless I know what exactly you mean. The GB category is already mostly English, though this includes the SW and north of England: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?8801-Reference-populations-for-AncestryDNA

To try and avoid completely hijacking this thread, may I suggest we move any discussions about the Ancestry DNA categories regarding Celtic, GB, ect to this thread please: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?10355-Ancestry-DNA-categories-discussion

Ron from PA
05-30-2017, 12:56 PM
I recall a year ago they were toying with the idea, of combining Britain and Europe West. I would say they decided to stay with the labels they have for the lay person. Now if I never tested with 23 did gedmatch and did paper research. I'd be walking around thinking I was British with a heavy Scandinavia component.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
05-30-2017, 07:04 PM
Comparing Irish with BB is not in light of recent news, that is an idea I got from some of the Irish users on this forum who were able to show me that Irish samples more closely match BB than any other population in Europe today. It's not a perfect match by any means from what I've seen, but I do believe they are the closest. I don't think it's entirely correct to say that there is a definite division in the UK between English S and W and the "Celtic" west and north. Of course, I am not entirely sure I understand precisely what you mean in this regard so I can't be sure that I do disagree with you unless I know what exactly you mean. The GB category is already mostly English, though this includes the SW and north of England: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?8801-Reference-populations-for-AncestryDNA

To try and avoid completely hijacking this thread, may I suggest we move any discussions about the Ancestry DNA categories regarding Celtic, GB, ect to this thread please: http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?10355-Ancestry-DNA-categories-discussion

Not to prologue the hijack Sktibo, but I think this comment is relevant to all British testing "The GB category is already mostly English, though this includes the SW and north of England" I would respectfully suggest that English is a Nationality not a label we can use to define DNA on a broad geographic scale. It appears the English have shall we say, different degrees of DNA from around the Anglo Saxon period. You might be able to draw a number of lines on a map which indicates where that A/S period percentage is highest ( but could that be including Norse as well?) but I think it would be too simplistic to ignore what else is there. As you say, some areas are more influenced by earlier historic periods. :) John

Ava
08-12-2019, 11:31 AM
if you have Scandinavian cousins then you have Scandinavian ancestry

FionnSneachta
08-12-2019, 05:46 PM
if you have Scandinavian cousins then you have Scandinavian ancestry

Or it's also possible that the Scandinavian match has an ancestor from where you're from.

ExoticButter
10-15-2019, 09:17 PM
Scandinavian DNA is part of having British ancestry.

Rufus191
10-18-2019, 06:35 PM
That would only be a normal level of Scandinavian for someone from the Orkney Islands (Orcadians). So if you are not 100% Orcadian, you likely have more recent Scandinavian ancestry.