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rhiannon
06-03-2017, 06:46 AM
I haven't posted on this forum much at all but I finally have a reason to now lol

My Results are:

Top two reference populations:

1. Danish
2. Norwegian

Regional results:

74% NW European
11% NE European
5% E European
3% SW European
7% Asia Minor

Neanderthal: 1.5%

MtDNA: X2a1b

I've also done Ancestry DNA last year and it said I had 0% NA. I know they don't look at haplogroups, though.

My mother's mother grew up near Iroquois territory in Canada. That region is where this haplogroup is very prevalent, apparently.

My mom always swore there to be some sort of NA Admixture on that side. I guess she's right unless someone on here can explain away this result, because I'm stumped.

sktibo
06-03-2017, 07:13 AM
I haven't posted on this forum much at all but I finally have a reason to now lol

My Results are:

Top two reference populations:

1. Danish
2. Norwegian

Regional results:

74% NW European
11% NE European
5% E European
3% SW European
7% Asia Minor

Neanderthal: 1.5%

MtDNA: X2a1b

I've also done Ancestry DNA last year and it said I had 0% NA. I know they don't look at haplogroups, though.

My mother's mother grew up near Iroquois territory in Canada. That region is where this haplogroup is very prevalent, apparently.

My mom always swore there to be some sort of NA Admixture on that side. I guess she's right unless someone on here can explain away this result, because I'm stumped.

Hi, welcome to the forum. According to Eupedia "X2a1b: found among the Ojibwe people" [http://www.eupedia.com/europe/Haplogroup_X_mtDNA.shtml] so that might be the case. However, I am far from an expert on this. What I have a bit of experience with is autosomal DNA.

I have a small percentage of Native American ancestry, which consistently appears between 1 and 2 percent on any DNA test I do. I didn't know I was Métis until my teenage years when my relative accidentally discovered this while working on our family tree. My DNA test collection indicates that the genealogists who worked with my family were correct. We had no family stories about anything regarding first nations and such topics made the older generations uncomfortable. I've met other people who discovered the same thing about their family history and had no idea. I've also met a lot of people who have family stories of having first nations ancestry, but are unable to find it when they look for it. It often upsets these individuals quite a bit when they aren't able to prove their heritage. So far I haven't met anyone who has had family stories of Native American ancestry which turned out to be true. I'm not saying its false in your case, but the moment people mention that someone swears there was Native American ancestry ect I become skeptical. I think there can be some truth to it.. for example: A friend of mine thought she was Native American because her grandmother mentioned that they had a NA ancestor. We got her DNA tested and it turned out to be 0%. I then traced her family tree to the best of my ability, what I found was that there was in fact a Native American connection, it just missed her bloodline. She had a distant grandparent who married a NA person and this person appears to have split off from the rest of their family to join NA culture.. so there was a Native American in her family, it just wasn't someone she was descended from.

In your case, it seems that NA admixture isn't going to come up in your autosomal test results, so if this is the part of your ancestry you are most interested in tracing I would look into and order a motherline specific DNA test to confirm if your Geno 2.0 haplogroup assignment is correct. If it is Native American, then perhaps you might be able to use that to pinpoint which group it comes from. I have no doubt that there are several highly knowledgeable individuals in that section of this forum who will help you trace this and recommend which company to test with; the community here is absolutely fantastic.

Best of luck on your journey, and I hope that you find what you want to find

rhiannon
06-03-2017, 07:30 AM
I figured the fact most of these genetic testing companies are looking at autosomal results might explain why my NA score comes back as zero. The Iroquois live right in that hotbed region of Eastern Canada where x2a1b is most prevalent. So, it's not isolated to just the Ojibwe. My great great grandmother grew up in some place called Iroquois Village.

I really don't care either way if there's NA in my family or not. I was more mildly surprised by this result than anything else....largely because I've listened to my mom talk a lot about it over the past several years and come to find out, she is probably right lol

Is there a good probability that the result might be wrong? I read someone posting that Geno 2.0 has spuriously reported haplogroups in many cases.

sktibo
06-03-2017, 07:52 AM
I figured the fact most of these genetic testing companies are looking at autosomal results might explain why my NA score comes back as zero. The Iroquois live right in that hotbed region of Eastern Canada where x2a1b is most prevalent. So, it's not isolated to just the Ojibwe. My great great grandmother grew up in some place called Iroquois Village.

I really don't care either way if there's NA in my family or not. I was more mildly surprised by this result than anything else....largely because I've listened to my mom talk a lot about it over the past several years and come to find out, she is probably right lol

Is there a good probability that the result might be wrong? I read someone posting that Geno 2.0 has spuriously reported haplogroups in many cases.

I think there's a chance it could be wrong, and best to verify it with multiple companies. I think someone here mentioned being assigned the wrong Y haplogroup from nat geo. As I said I'm no expert, but as I understand it, haplogroup X also appears in European populations to some extent, so you may have to go down the rabbit hole a fair bit to be completely sure it is Native American. If you decide to chase this one let us know, it should be an interesting DNA journey to watch. Personally, I hope that you do trace this line of yours and keep us posted.

rhiannon
06-03-2017, 09:21 AM
I think there's a chance it could be wrong, and best to verify it with multiple companies. I think someone here mentioned being assigned the wrong Y haplogroup from nat geo. As I said I'm no expert, but as I understand it, haplogroup X also appears in European populations to some extent, so you may have to go down the rabbit hole a fair bit to be completely sure it is Native American. If you decide to chase this one let us know, it should be an interesting DNA journey to watch. Personally, I hope that you do trace this line of yours and keep us posted.

I might do it considering that some argue the presence of X2 in the Americas is said to serve as evidence for migration patterns other than the just the accepted Beringian routes. Something I read about the Solutrean Hypothesis, which to my skeptical nature, strikes me as odd...but is it really?

Then when you really go down the rabbit hole, I've read some freaky theories about, oh....Atlantis. I'm totally serious, if you can believe that.

This is all too much for my science-minded self to take in with any levity.

On the serious side, what would be the best way for me to go about tracing this mtDNA? It's the only actual Haplogroup I was given to work with since nobody can do a deep ancestry trace on my father's side for obvious reasons (unless I can get a brother to cooperate lol).

Other than that, nothing in my results surprised me, although I find my top two reference populations pretty interesting given my heavily British Isles-influenced ancestry.

sktibo
06-03-2017, 10:00 AM
I'll have to check out the solutrean hypothesis, I've not heard of it. some people have suggested travel by sea from oceania as an alternative historical route to the americas, and that's about all I've heard of aside from the beringia theory... it sounds like you know a lot more about this topic than i do.

If I were you i would head into the mtdna section of the forum, or the commercial testing sections under 23andme (which i consider to be the current best overall dna test) and ftdna. Ask some questions about which test gives the deepest mtdna assignment.

ArmandoR1b
06-03-2017, 03:01 PM
The Solutrean hypothesis never had sufficient evidence to be considered a possibility but now there is more evidence it counter it. See https://dna-explained.com/2016/01/28/native-american-haplogroup-x2a-solutrean-hebrew-or-beringian/

FTDNA, YSeq, and FGC are the only companies that I know of the test the complete mitochondrial genome. FTDNA has the largest database of the three and they do matching.

There are people that know the exact percentage of the mtDNA that is tested by 23andme and Geno 2.0. I don't know what it is but it is less than FTDNA. This ISOGG wiki page is old but has some good info https://isogg.org/wiki/MtDNA_testing_comparison_chart

If you have access to your raw data you can run it through James Lick's calculator at https://dna.jameslick.com/mthap/ It's a really nice tool that lists which mutations define which subclades and I think that you will find your haplogroup to be accurate.

Ian Logan has the DNA results of samples from academic studies that are X2a1b at http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/x2a_genbank_sequences.htm