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Caburn
06-07-2017, 05:39 PM
The Guardian 7th June 2017:

'Oldest Homo sapiens bones found shake foundations of the human story'

'Idea that modern humans evolved in East Africa 200,000 years ago challenged by extraordinary discovery of 300,000-year-old remains in Moroccan mine'

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/07/oldest-homo-sapiens-bones-ever-found-shake-foundations-of-the-human-story

~

GailT
06-07-2017, 05:53 PM
Another article in the NT Times (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/07/science/human-fossils-morocco.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0). If the new dates are accurate for the origins of AMH, yDNA haplogroup A00 fits within the context of AMH.

Dewsloth
06-07-2017, 05:54 PM
I guess in that chronological light, the 130,000 year old mammoth butchering/hunting site in San Diego seems a bit more plausible.

Lank
06-07-2017, 06:28 PM
No DNA (http://www.nature.com/news/oldest-homo-sapiens-fossil-claim-rewrites-our-species-history-1.22114) in these apparently...


Hublin says his team tried and failed to obtain DNA from the Jebel Irhoud bones. A genomic analysis could have clearly established whether the remains lie on the lineage that leads to modern humans.

JohnHowellsTyrfro
06-07-2017, 08:24 PM
BBC article possibly hinting that early humans could have also evolved outside Africa. John

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40194150

tranvanchienhn
06-08-2017, 07:07 AM
thank you

Stellaritic
06-08-2017, 12:30 PM
https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22336.epdf?referrer_access_token=fm7DoYp8_78 TZOMCYoekzNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0O1QiTIbccJK6aQkD6P0 DkrCkk19KI2Uq_FZvyaptbDSyid1js4gVZu80J9liCnl_A6kC_ RKreRry0VKRRhNFZGaze02WRa_6siNAtS5el_FnS5mYWK2O4yf xwUsiqIxIanLfrjzC4EqzmSKTsqSUbeDKy1-OgIka7XlAusa1GKozjxQvj6PnaSCPJybFaQr_McnYYOm6sR4hm nkApiEtdiCQgpv_JY7dXUOVcpzg-YdtBBYLsrA3ULDN-sOE1WFi7gad_Zl-z-djART-GET4mY
https://image.ibb.co/if4Bsa/irhoud.png

ThirdTerm
06-08-2017, 06:34 PM
Fossil evidence points to an African origin of Homo sapiens from a group called either H. heidelbergensis or H. rhodesiensis. However, the exact place and time of emergence of H. sapiens remain obscure because the fossil record is scarce and the chronological age of many key specimens remains uncertain. In particular, it is unclear whether the present day ‘modern’ morphology rapidly emerged approximately 200 thousand years ago (ka) among earlier representatives of H. sapiens1 or evolved gradually over the last 400 thousand years2. Here we report newly discovered human fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and interpret the affinities of the hominins from this site with other archaic and recent human groups. We identified a mosaic of features including facial, mandibular and dental morphology that aligns the Jebel Irhoud material with early or recent anatomically modern humans and more primitive neurocranial and endocranial morphology. In combination with an age of 315  34 thousand years (as determined by thermoluminescence dating)3, this evidence makes Jebel Irhoud the oldest and richest African Middle Stone Age hominin site that documents early stages of the H. sapiens clade in which key features of modern morphology were established. Furthermore, it shows that the evolutionary processes behind the emergence of H. sapiens involved the whole African continent.
https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v546/n7657/full/nature22336.html


Hublin et al. (2017) failed to extract DNA from the Jebel Irhoud bones, only relying on facial, mandibular and dental morphology, and shape analysis methods are not as accurate as a genomic analysis. Palaeontologist Jeffrey Schwartz cautioned that the Jebel Irhoud bones may not be H. sapiens. The dating method used by Hublin et al. (2017) is thermoluminescence, which dates the last time items like ceramics were heated, common in the authentication of old ceramic wares. It cannot be used to date items more than 10,000 years old with accuracy.



Hublin says his team tried and failed to obtain DNA from the Jebel Irhoud bones. A genomic analysis could have clearly established whether the remains lie on the lineage that leads to modern humans.

Palaeontologist Jeffrey Schwartz, at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, says the new finds are important — but he is not convinced that they should be considered H. sapiens. Too many different-looking fossils have been lumped together under the species, he thinks, complicating efforts to interpret new fossils and to come up with scenarios on how, when and where our species emerged.

https://www.nature.com/news/oldest-homo-sapiens-fossil-claim-rewrites-our-species-history-1.22114

Judith
06-09-2017, 07:11 AM
This is the report of the paper in the yesterday's financial Times (which does not usually scramble science too badly)1675116752

It shows the cranial reconstruction fairly well, as as the PCA says the face is recognisably human just the elongated skull would look strange on the street.

E_M81_I3A
06-09-2017, 05:17 PM
This is the report of the paper in the yesterday's financial Times (which does not usually scramble science too badly)1675116752

It shows the cranial reconstruction fairly well, as as the PCA says the face is recognisably human just the elongated skull would look strange on the street.

Link to online version

https://www.ft.com/content/00a266c2-4ad3-11e7-919a-1e14ce4af89b?mhq5j=e1

Grossvater
06-09-2017, 07:05 PM
No DNA (http://www.nature.com/news/oldest-homo-sapiens-fossil-claim-rewrites-our-species-history-1.22114) in these apparently...

Where's Eske Willerslev when you need him?

Judith
06-09-2017, 08:33 PM
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eske_Willerslev
In case like me you did not recognise the name, but I did recall the work and papers!