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raschau
06-08-2017, 10:16 PM
My maternal line hits a brick wall six generations back with a woman born circa 1834 in Tennessee, but I have no Ashkenazi ancestry or Jewish ancestors as far as I can tell.

Apparently k1a1b1a descend from pre-historic European women whose descendants married Jewish men from the Levant as they migrated into Europe, founding the Ashkenazi community. As a non-Jewish k1a1b1a myself, does this mean an ancient maternal ancestor of mine was a European woman with ostensibly European descendants, making me a distant 'cousin' of the Ashkenazim who seem to be overwhelmingly k1a1b1a, or does this specific mutation mean a more recent maternal ancestor was an Ashkenazi woman? In other words, is K an ancient European haplogroup and k1a1b1a a more recent Ashkenazi haplotype? What are the odds of overlapping?

From what I can tell, k1a1b1a is very rare in non-Ashkenazim, but it does happen. Am I just an exception to the rule? Is it a coincidence that I share a haplotype with a major Jewish subclade? What do the specific mutations in my K-lineage mean, exactly? I realize the jury is still out on this, and that Behar, Costa, et. al. are at odds with their conclusions (European origin vs. Levantine origin), but I'd appreciate any light that can be shed for curiosity's sake.

J1 DYS388=13
06-09-2017, 07:19 AM
Well both Costa and Behar date the age of K1a1b1a to 4,000 to 5,000 years. That's older than Judaism. Therefore, the first Jewish K1a1b1a was an "assimilated" non-Jewish European woman, and there could be some K1a1b1a lines which were never Jewish.

AJL
06-11-2017, 04:33 AM
To what threshold have you tested? If you match all and only Ashkenazi people with no mutations with a full mitochondrial sequencing, I'd say it's somewhat more likely you have an Ashkenazi ancestor who converted somewhere along the line. If you have no or few exact matches, though, it's most probable you share only an ancient ancestor.

raschau
07-17-2018, 05:35 AM
To what threshold have you tested? If you match all and only Ashkenazi people with no mutations with a full mitochondrial sequencing, I'd say it's somewhat more likely you have an Ashkenazi ancestor who converted somewhere along the line. If you have no or few exact matches, though, it's most probable you share only an ancient ancestor.

Looks like it may be an ancient ancestor; I match more non-Ashkenazim than Ashkenazim with a mtFull test:

mtDNA - Ancestral Origins
HVR1 and HVR2 Matches

Poland 90/4064
Ashkenazi (18), Galicia (1), Prussia (2)

Russian Federation 63/2695
Ashkenazi (11)

Ukraine 59/1746
Ashkanazi (Chausey) (1), Ashkenazi (22)

Germany 52/11462
Ashkenazi (9)

Lithuania 43/977
Ashkenazi (14)

Hungary 30/1013
Ashkenazi (6)

Romania 29/557
Ashkenazi (9)

Belarus 28/613
Ashkenazi (5)

Austria 20/970
Ashkenazi (3), Bohemia (1)

mtDNA - Haplogroup Origins
HVR1, HVR2, and Coding Region Matches
Genetic Distance-1

Poland 34
Ashkenazi (4)

Russian Federation 24
Ashkenazi (2)

Ukraine 20
Ashkenazi (5)

Lithuania 18
Ashkenazi (8)

Germany 17
Ashkenazi (6)