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Mike_G
06-19-2017, 03:53 AM
My youngest daughter has already tested, which tightened up my own numbers as a result of the phasing. I just ordered a kit for my wife and oldest girl. Will those results further affect (and hopefully refine) mine as well? Thanks.

geebee
06-19-2017, 09:07 PM
My youngest daughter has already tested, which tightened up my own numbers as a result of the phasing. I just ordered a kit for my wife and oldest girl. Will those results further affect (and hopefully refine) mine as well? Thanks.

My understanding is that child phasing is done using only one child, no matter how many there may be. This certainly seems to be true for my father, who has six tested offspring. His results probably should be as least as good as, if not better, than for a child with both parents tested. Instead, it certainly appears that only one of us was used in the phasing of his data.

Your wife's results should improve your daughters' phasing, but I have no idea whether 23andMe actually uses a child's phased results. It would make sense, but it would also require more effort on the part of the company. I doubt that they make this effort, but simply phase the parent using the unphased results from the child -- but maybe I'm being too much of a skeptic here.

However, as I said, 23andMe will use both parents' results when phasing a child, if both are available. So I would encourage you to have your wife tested. I would also get a test for the 2nd daughter, because even if it does not improve your results, it will still allow you to better judge any instances of questionable child phasing of your data.

EDIT: I checked the "Change Log" for my father's Ancestry Composition. For Dec. 24, 2014 it says, "Your Ancestry Composition results were most recently updated and reflect connecting with a biological child." I believe it does indeed mean "a" child, not all six of us together or even just two of us.

It would even be a bit more helpful if it said which of us was used, but it doesn't.

Mike_G
06-19-2017, 09:18 PM
My understanding is that child phasing is done using only one child, no matter how many there may be. This certainly seems to be true for my father, who has six tested offspring. His results probably should be as least as good as, if not better, than for a child with both parents tested. Instead, it certainly appears that only one of us was used in the phasing of his data.

Your wife's results should improve your daughters' phasing, but I have no idea whether 23andMe actually uses a child's phased results. It would make sense, but it would also require more effort on the part of the company. I doubt that they make this effort, but simply phase the parent using the unphased results from the child -- but maybe I'm being too much of a skeptic here.

However, as I said, 23andMe will use both parents' results when phasing a child, if both are available. So I would encourage you to have your wife tested. I would also get a test for the 2nd daughter, because even if it does not improve your results, it will still allow you to better judge any instances of questionable child phasing of your data.

Thanks. Since my youngest daughter and I have already tested, only my oldest girl and wife remain. I ordered their kits last night.

geebee
06-19-2017, 09:18 PM
Mike, if you do add your other daughter, be sure to check the change log for Ancestry Composition. I don't think they'll rephase your results using this daughter, but it's always possible.

lwa714
07-03-2017, 04:54 AM
Mike, if you do add your other daughter, be sure to check the change log for Ancestry Composition. I don't think they'll rephase your results using this daughter, but it's always possible.

Testing another child won't change your AC a bit, but testing both parents will. But your daughters will then reap in their benefits :)