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View Full Version : everything you ever wanted to know about fire but were afraid to ask



MikeWhalen
06-28-2017, 04:52 PM
some cool stuff here, even for a guy thats pretty experienced and building/using camp fires
...I liked the graph of the 5 stages fire goes through

https://www.vox.com/2016/7/20/12212472/how-to-build-a-fire-like-a-caveman

Mike

Saetro
06-28-2017, 09:20 PM
some cool stuff here, even for a guy thats pretty experienced and building/using camp fires
...I liked the graph of the 5 stages fire goes through

https://www.vox.com/2016/7/20/12212472/how-to-build-a-fire-like-a-caveman

Mike

Back in the 1970s when I was at university, some of our approaches might now look a little crude.
For example, in biochemistry, to see how a complex cellular system worked, we would try to sabotage it in various ways.
In organic chemistry, one way to work out the structure of something might still involve pyrolysis - controlled burning to some more stable fragment.
That end result gave us a fair idea of what the original structure was, and we could use other techniques like the sophisticated spectrographic methods to find out more.
At the time, I thought pyrolysis was barbaric - something from the nineteenth century.
Later I realised it helped understand fire.

More importantly, we use aspects of this in cooking and food preparation.
Closest to home is probably those bitter compounds we generate in coffee beans when roasting them.
The original compounds tend to reorganise into the flavours we enjoy.
Overdo it and the roast will be too bitter.

So, enjoy your next cup of pyrolised delight!