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paoloferrari
07-18-2017, 06:55 PM
sorry but the link on nature doesn't work

Dog domestication happened just once, ancient DNA study suggests

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/dog-domestication-happened-just-once-ancient-dna-study-suggests

leonardo
07-18-2017, 07:11 PM
Did I see there is now a dog DNA test?
https://venturebeat.com/2017/07/18/fetching-dna-embark-raises-4-5-million-for-canine-version-of-23andme/

JohnHowellsTyrfro
07-18-2017, 08:08 PM
Did I see there is now a dog DNA test?
https://venturebeat.com/2017/07/18/fetching-dna-embark-raises-4-5-million-for-canine-version-of-23andme/

Even less reliable than the ones for humans. :) John

leonardo
07-20-2017, 04:43 PM
Another article about dogs and genetics. This one explains why they are so socialable with humans.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/dogs-breeds-pets-wolves-evolution/

JohnHowellsTyrfro
07-20-2017, 05:23 PM
Another article about dogs and genetics. This one explains why they are so socialable with humans.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/dogs-breeds-pets-wolves-evolution/

I think in a way the article puts a bit of a negative spin on things from the dog's point of view. It is suggesting dependency but on the other hand whatever part the genetic variation played it allowed the dog to respond more flexibly and successfully to what was going on in the World. I think maybe dogs see humans as "providers" and have done for thousands of years, that is why they look to us for "guidance", it's become instinct maybe. There are a lot more dogs in the World than wolves. :)
I think it's more a partnership, with the humans as senior partners but the dogs making a significant contribution, perhaps more significant in the past when it made a big difference to the amount of meat available to people. I think maybe genetics is only a part of it, scavenging brought early "dogs" into contact with people something maybe genetic made some more tolerant of people. Perhaps wolves on the other hand were hunting larger prey and were seen more as competitors by people.
As I mentioned on another thread it seems possible to domestic foxes or at least some foxes if raised from young and the fox at least here in the UK, is part scavenger, bringing them into closer contact with people. John

leonardo
07-20-2017, 10:09 PM
The one thing I have noticed, as somebody who has had cats and dogs as pets, dogs are much more amenable - generally speaking. I don't know if a wolf would be easier to train than a large wild cat, but I would guess they are. Maybe canines are just a better fit for humans?

JohnHowellsTyrfro
07-21-2017, 09:43 AM
The one thing I have noticed, as somebody who has had cats and dogs as pets, dogs are much more amenable - generally speaking. I don't know if a wolf would be easier to train than a large wild cat, but I would guess they are. Maybe canines are just a better fit for humans?

Yes definitely I think, not that we are very similar to dogs, but we complement each other. We don't live with fellow apes for example (not generally anyway). :) I have a dog and cats too.
I understand that if a domestic cat doesn't have human contact in the early weeks it becomes basically feral from that point on and can't be domesticated subsequently or at least not easily.
I'm no expert on Wolves but I think domesticating them is very difficult, particularly when they reach maturity, but I'm sure others know far more than me on that and I'm happy to be corrected. I think you sometimes have Wolf/Dog hybrids may complicate the picture. John