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View Full Version : Colonial settlement patterns & gaps vs. NPEs



AJL
08-11-2012, 03:14 PM
Hi all,

In your autosomal research, when you have a large number of matches to a surname that is not in your tree but which comes from a region where you do have ancestry, do you begin to suspect an NPE?

I have a number of cases of not overly common surnames reappearing across testing platforms that are not in my tree but which are from regions where I have ancestry (e.g. Cameron, Beyer/Bayer), but which could certainly be in my tree before 1800. I am usually inclined to think this comes from either unattributed ancestors, or more often similar patterns of colonization where a sibling left more descendants than my own ancestor.

If I can find that my Relative Finder/Family Finder matches had ancestors living in proximity to mine in both the Old World and the New World, I usually chalk this down to their being related in the Old without my having found the path yet.

What's your approach? Have you found any previously unidentified NPEs yet through autosomal research?

thetick
08-20-2012, 04:54 AM
I normally assume just name butchering in these cases. Most of my ancestors beyond 5 generations were poor peasants and could not read or write so their names were recorded with spelling errors. Also many were Mennonites which an NPE is possible but probably less likely than most other European colonials.

AJL
08-20-2012, 05:26 AM
That's a very good point.

Using the new surname frequency feature at 23andme, I see my mother has a very high match to Calvert in her Relative Finder. I don't have any Calvert ancestors, but I do have Culver.

thetick
08-22-2012, 01:34 AM
Calvert/Culver is a good example. In my line there is Bürgi, Berky, Bergey and Berge. This line is confirmed with very close YNA 66/67 matches. I also have a Kline line with many RF matches with Klein. Finally an Abel, Able, Auble, Auval, Awvul, Apple line.. that one was a research nightmare! Now if I could find a Jost Bürgi YDNA descendant I would be ecstatic.

AJL
08-23-2012, 04:12 AM
There were Clines and Klines living near two different areas of Ontario my ancestors were in, though I don't know if the two were related to each other.

AJL
08-24-2012, 01:02 AM
In my line there is Bürgi, Berky, Bergey and Berge.

I nearly forgot, we were also previously discussing Bayer/Beyea/Boyer etc. in my tree.

Baltimore1937
09-06-2012, 06:42 AM
I think colonial times are interesting. Only my maternal grandmother's branch goes back that far in the USA. And out of that branch is my mtDNA haplotype U5b2b2. Even the HVR1 is rather rare, so matches at SMGF, for example, can be interesting. I seem to get farther with plain old genealogy than with all the fancy genetics. But entries at Ancestry can't always be taken as accurate. So my tree changes from time to time. My latest version goes back to an Elizabeth Potter of New Haven, Connecticut. But she was probably born in Buckinghamshire, England. That's where her parents came from. And that maternal line goes back to around 1500, and still in Buckinghamshire. Potter male line seems to go back to Kent, England. A few of the connecting links between me and then are kind of tenuous. I think there may have been a staging area or spreading center for my U5 haplotype, subsequent to New Haven, and via Long Island, in the Trenton, NJ area; southward before the Revolutionary War, and westward after the war.
;)

AJL
09-07-2012, 12:08 AM
I also have ancestors not far from Trenton on two different branches.

This area can be remarkably complicated for research in the colonial period. From what I have seen it has the potential to include, at the very least, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish, English, German, Huguenot/French, African, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, Quaker, and Native American. Many inhabitants of this area in the 18th century or their descendants moved to Pennsylvania/Ohio, Virginia, and Canada (both New Brunswick and Ontario). Of the ones who came to Canada, many were fairly inbred with other Loyalists

Baltimore1937
09-07-2012, 04:55 AM
I also have ancestors not far from Trenton on two different branches.

This area can be remarkably complicated for research in the colonial period. From what I have seen it has the potential to include, at the very least, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish, English, German, Huguenot/French, African, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, Quaker, and Native American. Many inhabitants of this area in the 18th century or their descendants moved to Pennsylvania/Ohio, Virginia, and Canada (both New Brunswick and Ontario). Of the ones who came to Canada, many were fairly inbred with other Loyalists

I'm new at looking at the Trenton region and up there in general. Up to recently, I've been concentrating in the North Carolina area, and expanding from there. If, and it's a big if, my maternal line included a Keziah Hunt, born in Maidenhead, Hunterdon, New Jersey about 1719, then she married a Stephen Biles in 1737 there (well, she married him regardless whether she was in my line or not). I can't find anything so far on Ancestry about Biles. But I saw on the Biles forum that a Biles came over with the William Penn fleet. That is, a Biles line was in Philadelphia going back to Penn. That sounds Quaker, although I doubt that Stephen Biles was actively Quaker at that point (can't marry outside of Quakerdom). But it would seem to make him of English descent. Keziah's parents (Ralph 2 Hunt & Elizabeth nee Phillips) came from Long Island.

AJL
09-07-2012, 10:19 PM
Ah yes, I know of that line:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tompkins/manuscripts/manuscripts_hopewell.html

Seemingly English but there's also Edward Hunt who married a Laurenson, who was probably of Dutch extraction.

Baltimore1937
09-08-2012, 01:40 AM
I found a John Biles of the same age cohort who ended up down in Rowan County (Salisbury), North Carolina. He was born in New Jersey. This tidbit from a different search site (not Ancestry). I didn't see Stephen given as a brother, so they may have been cousins.