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History-of-Things
08-11-2012, 05:25 PM
An Interesting Discussion of Tang Dynasty's Wu Zetian, China's Only "Female Emperor" (http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/history/2012/08/the-demonization-of-empress-wu/)

History-of-Things
08-19-2012, 04:47 PM
2500 Year-Old Siberian Mummy Displays Elaborate Tattoos (http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/08/siberian-mummy-has-tattoos/)

Paleo-Botany and Culture of Ancient Japan (http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/08/2012/technology-to-the-rescue-for-ancient-japanese-culture)

Discovered Documents Seem to Reveal Japanese Army's "Management" of Korean Comfort Women During WWII (http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/08/117_117548.html)

History-of-Things
08-22-2012, 03:29 PM
New Excavation Sheds Light on Emergence of Late Paleolithic in NW China (http://phys.org/news/2012-08-excavations-shuidonggou-late-paleolithic-northern.html)

NYU Hosts Major Exhibition of Artifacts from Buddhist Caves at Xiangtangshan (http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/june-2012/article/buddhist-cave-temples-of-xiangtangshan-revealed-to-the-world)

Lao Skull Earliest Modern Human Fossil in SE Asia, Suggests Early Out of Africa Migration (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120820152204.htm)

Cambodian Children Discover 1000 Year-Old Buddhist Statues (http://www.examiner.com/article/cambodian-children-discover-thousand-year-old-buddhist-statues)

zaender
08-23-2012, 06:42 PM
Lao Skull Earliest Modern Human Fossil in SE Asia, Suggests Early Out of Africa Migration (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120820152204.htm)

my interpretation:
http://zaender.com/blogs/tampaling.gif

History-of-Things
08-26-2012, 04:23 PM
Four Tombs Provide Insight into Ancient Tibetan Kingdom (http://www.china.org.cn/china/Off_the_Wire/2012-08/24/content_26320071.htm)

History-of-Things
09-01-2012, 02:32 PM
Bronze Age Settlement Unearthed in Northwest China's Xinjiang Province (http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2012/08/31/Bronze-Age-settlement-unearthed-in-China/UPI-58041346449582/?spt=hs&or=sn)

History-of-Things
09-13-2012, 02:01 PM
Moving Sultan Tipu's Armory Proves a Challenging Task (http://www.asianage.com/bengaluru/tipu-s-armoury-stops-railways-its-tracks-536)

Study Suggests Peking Man an Isolated Population (http://phys.org/news/2012-09-peking-isolated-population.html)

Set of Five Neolithic Hoes Excavated in Vietnam (http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/Life-Style/229918/ancient-farm-tools-help-dig-up-the-past.html)

History-of-Things
09-17-2012, 03:29 PM
Recent Excavations Show Broader Influence of Ancient Japan's Yamato Kingdom (http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120916001832.htm)

Archaeologists and Other Scholars Explore Caves Associated with Nepal's Mustang Kingdom (http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/10/mustang-caves/finkel-text)

History-of-Things
09-24-2012, 03:27 PM
1000 Year-Old Village Complete with Unique Carved Stone Coffins Found in the Philippines (http://journalstar.com/news/world/asia/ap-exclusive-unique-tombs-found-in-philippines/article_8505fcdf-427e-5905-89c7-543cab94c564.html)

Buddha Hall in Fangshan District of Beijing could be China's Earliest (from Sui Dynasty) (http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/734856.shtml)...my eyebrows are raised on this one--dendro or radiocarbon dating would be desirable

On the Trail of Early Gupta Architecture in Uttar Pradesh Excavations (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/travel/Have-you-heard-of-the-ghost-walls-in-Lathiya-UP/articleshow/16526371.cms)

History-of-Things
09-27-2012, 11:13 AM
Debate Over Historical Value of Imelda Marcos's Clothes in the Philippines (http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=57924#.UGQpLMVQDU0)

5000 Year-Old Notched Stone Found in Vietnam Thought to be Lunar Calendar (http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/art-entertainment/48893/ancient-calendar-unearthed.html)

1000 Year-Old Tibetan Buddhist Sculpture Acquired by Nazis in 1938 is Made from an Iron Meteorite (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120926104255.htm)

Climate Helped the Expansion of the Mongol Empire and Also Helped Fracture It (http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2012/sep/23/weatherwatch-climate-ghengis-khan-mongolia)

Archaeologists Find Ahom Military Earthworks in Assam (http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/NewDelhi/Found-Medieval-training-site-for-Ahom-warriors/Article1-936211.aspx)

History-of-Things
10-03-2012, 04:33 PM
Protocols Developed for Light Microscopy to be Used to Study Ancient Chinese Ceramics (http://phys.org/news/2012-09-professor-protocols-ancient-wares-technique.html)

Ancient Beef Recovered from Warring States Period Chinese Tomb (http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/2-000-year-old-beef-found-in-nw-china_802724.html)

India's Rock-Cut Temples at Elephanta Under Threat (http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/september-2012/article/india-s-monumental-city-of-caves-under-threat)

History-of-Things
10-16-2012, 04:51 AM
Chinese Scientist Suggests Pandas were used as Food by Prehistoric Sichuan People (http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=58343#.UHzncj15ddg)

History-of-Things
10-18-2012, 02:29 PM
In Search of Kubilai Khan's Fleet Destroyed by Vietnamese
http://www.theage.com.au/national/education/in-search-of-kublai-khans-fleet-20121015-27mm6.html

Uncovering the Transportation Network of Angkor Via Satellite
http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2012/10/scienceshot-building-angkor-wat.html?ref=hp

History-of-Things
10-23-2012, 04:03 PM
Sky Caves of Nepal
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/10/mustang-caves/finkel-text

Is Nomadic Mongolian Life Under Threat?
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121022080150.htm

Significant Numbers of WWII Era Spitfires Located in Burma
http://www.kwtx.com/news/offbeat/headlines/Treasure-Trove-Of-WWII-Spitfires-Found-Buried-In-Myanmar-174793641.html

Core Sediments for Japanese Lake Provide Accurate Timeline Back 50,000 BP
http://www.nature.com/news/core-sample-sends-carbon-clock-farther-back-in-time-1.11622

History-of-Things
10-30-2012, 05:01 PM
Chinese Scientists Uncover Monumental Neolithic City in Shaanxi Province
http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/741237.shtml

The Importance of Chicken to Ancient Chinese
http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2012-10/26/content_15850572.htm

Bali's Largest Ancient Hindu Temple Discovered
http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=58575#.UJAAND15ddg

History-of-Things
11-05-2012, 03:43 PM
A Somewhat Dated Summary of Thai Archaeology
http://www.bangkokpost.com/arts-and-culture/book/319586/digging-thailand

Important 9th century Religious Sites Found in Eastern India
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/features/ninth-century-ad-antiquities-found-by-archaeologists-in-jharkhand/article4057909.ece

History-of-Things
11-15-2012, 02:42 PM
Private Benefactor in China Has Opened Museums to Recount What Happened During the Cultural Revolution
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-fg-china-museums-20121108,0,1592601,full.story

Plumbing Early East/West Blending with Scythians in Mongolia's Altai Mountains
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121112090426.htm

Indus River Valley Civilization 2000 Years Older Than Previously Thought
http://in.news.yahoo.com/indus-valley-2-000-years-older-thought-183000133.html

Archaeologists Unearth Pre-Buddhist Era Remains in Pakistan's Swat Region
http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/report_archaeologists-unearth-3000-year-old-pre-buddhist-era-cemetery-in-pakistan-s-swat-region_1764853

History-of-Things
12-13-2012, 02:37 AM
Circa 1200 CE Shipwreck Found Off Korean Coast
http://www.arirang.co.kr/News/News_View.asp?nseq=141265&code=Ne6&category=7

Unearthing One of China First Emperor Qin Shihuang's Palaces
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/dec/03/china-ruined-palace-terracotta-army

How Standardized Tests Helped Start the Taiping Rebellion
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2012/12/03/how-the-first-standardized-tests-helped-start-a-war-really/

The Hunt for Genghis Khan's Tomb
http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/12/02/the-hidden-grave-of-history-s-greatest-warrior.html

In Pakistan, Secrets of a 3000 Year-Old Cemetery
http://www.wbur.org/npr/166253606/in-pakistan-secrets-of-a-3-000-year-old-cemetery

History-of-Things
12-23-2012, 05:35 AM
Remains of a 6th Century Man in Suit of Armor Who Had Turned to Face a Lava Flow Unearthed in Gunma Prefecture, Japan
http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=59640#.UNaN2D15ddg

Evidence of Neolithic Care for the Disabled Unearthed in Northern Vietnam
http://www.denverpost.com/nationworld/ci_22212020/archaeologists-find-prehistoric-humans-cared-sick-and-disabled?source=rss

Ruins of Ancient Hospital Uncovered in Sri Lanka
http://www.colombopage.com/archive_12B/Dec16_1355635126CH.php

On What is Possibly the Earliest Surviving Mughal Document
http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/asian-and-african/2012/12/earliest-surviving-mughal-document.html

History-of-Things
01-08-2013, 03:28 PM
Han Dynasty Coin Hoard Found in Inner Mongolia
http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-12-30/china/36063002_1_ancient-coins-han-dynasty-archaeologists

Vietnamese Cave an Important Stone Age Site
http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/art-entertainment/56073/tomb-of-prehistoric-people-discovered-in-cave.html

Important Ly Dynasty Finds in Vietnamese Excavations
http://www.thanhniennews.com/2010/pages/20130108-ly-dynasty-vestiges-surface-maiden-appearance.aspx

History-of-Things
01-31-2013, 05:22 PM
Key Curry Ingredients Already in Use by Indus River Valley Civilization 4000 Years Ago
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/food/2013/01/indus_civilization_food_how_scientists_are_figurin g_out_what_curry_was_like.single.html

Ancient Chinese Bronze Arrowhead Found in Japan
http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2013/01/24/Ancient-Chinese-arrowhead-found-in-Japan/UPI-31061359067663/

History-of-Things
02-05-2013, 03:10 PM
Stone Weapons Point to Very Early Cultural Link Between Korea and Japan
http://japandailypress.com/archaeologists-unearth-deeper-japan-korea-historical-ties-through-weapons-0122519

Over 100 Tang-Era Tombs Found in Xinjiang's Parmir Mountains, Including a Sizable Number Devoted to Infants
http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.hk/2013/02/1300-year-old-tomb-cluster-discovered.html#.URER-T15ddg

History-of-Things
02-22-2013, 01:10 PM
Ancient Ceramic from China Reveals 20,000 Year-Old History of Soup Making
http://nhpr.org/post/stone-age-stew-soup-making-may-be-older-wed-thought

Important Metal Finds from Beneath Karnataka Hindu Temple
http://www.thehindu.com/features/friday-review/history-and-culture/ancient-copper-plates-gold-coins-found-in-karnataka-temple/article4436284.ece

History-of-Things
06-21-2013, 05:41 AM
Notable Murals Discovered in Looted Chinese Tomb
http://www.livescience.com/37478-ancient-mural-tomb-discovered-in-china.html

Ancient Tombs in Xinjiang, China, May Suggest Sun Worship
http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2013/06/04/2500-year-old-tombs-in-China-suggest-sun-worshiping-culture/UPI-73551370392102/

Archaeology Rewriting Khmer History
http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130619-909263.html

History-of-Things
06-24-2013, 11:25 AM
High Tech Analysis Related to Japan's Kofun (Proto-Historic Burial Mounds)
http://phys.org/news/2013-06-high-tech-insights-japan-ancient-kofun.html

History-of-Things
06-28-2013, 03:36 PM
Ancient Buddhist Artifacts Unearthed in Naogaon District of Bangladesh
http://www.thedailystar.net/beta2/news/ancient-artifacts-found-in-naogaon/

History-of-Things
06-29-2013, 05:16 PM
Agriculture May Have Begun in China's Subtropical South Before Arrival of Rice from the Lower Yangzi
http://scienceblog.com/63201/ancient-diet-find-could-shatter-ideas-of-how-agriculture-emerged/

Excavation Results from a Substantial Necropolis Site near Suizhou, Hubei, China
http://www.kaogu.net.cn/en/detail.asp?ProductID=4231

Excavation Results from a Stone Age Site with Long Occupation in Heilongjiang Province, China
http://www.kaogu.net.cn/en/detail.asp?ProductID=4216

History-of-Things
07-10-2013, 05:04 PM
New Find Points to Neolithic Origin of Writing in China
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/archaeologists-find-primitive-writing-on-5000-year-old-relics-in-eastern-china-excavation/2013/07/10/3798499e-e961-11e2-818e-aa29e855f3ab_story.html

Painted Bronze Found in Early Western Zhou Tomb in Central China
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/culture/2013-07/09/c_132523958.htm

Dong Son Bronze Drum Found in Northern Vietnam
http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/art-entertainment/78637/ancient-bronze-drum-found-in-bac-kan.html

13th Century Shipwreck Excavated Off of Central Vietnam
http://www.menafn.com/d2b81bff-1e37-49b7-b648-84d850d6f91d/Shipwreck-off-Vietnam-yields-700yearold-coins-and-ceramics?src=main

1300 BCE Village and Pre-Ashokan Shrine Found in Nepal Near Buddha's Traditional Birthplace
http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Remains+of+1300+BC+village%E 2%80%9A+pre-Ashokan+shrines+in+Lumbini&NewsID=382853

Jean M
07-10-2013, 07:09 PM
Harappan-era site bigger and older than Mohenjo-daro?
http://www.stonepages.com/news/archives/005067.html

History-of-Things
07-15-2013, 07:33 AM
Korean Silla Sword with Inscription indicating Unknown "King" May Cause Reassessment of Who Received High Status Burials
http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20130703000796

Excavations Uncover Oldest Yet Known Middle Paleolithic Tools in India
http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/june-2013/article/excavations-uncover-earliest-middle-paleolithic-stone-tools-in-india

History-of-Things
07-27-2013, 02:59 PM
Controversy over Indonesia's Gunung Padang--perhaps the World's Most Ancient Human Monument or a Natural Formation?
http://www.theage.com.au/world/digging-for-the-truth-at-controversial-megalithic-site-20130726-2qphb.html

Double-Faced Bronze Head Found in Western Zhou Tomb in Suizhou, Hubei Province, China
http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.hk/2013/07/two-face-bronze-head-unearthed-in.html#.UfPKXD0WKSo

Ancient Copper Working Civilization in Gansu Province, China (albeit the story is somewhat muddled in dates, not atypical of Chinese popular press)
http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/799018.shtml#.UfPNQD0WKSp

History-of-Things
08-07-2013, 04:37 PM
1500 Year-Old Western Chinese House Along Silk Road Built Using Central Asian Technology
http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/abode-house-in-china-s-silk-road-resembles-those-from-c-asia-113073100938_1.html

Efforts on to Restore Madurai's Rani Mangammal Palace
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/efforts-on-to-restore-rani-mangammal-palace/article4996402.ece

parasar
11-25-2014, 07:05 PM
Shaka Samvat 605
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/origin-number-zero-180953392/
The Origin of the Number Zero


Four miles from the great temple of Angkor Wat, deep in the Cambodian jungle...

Found on a stone stele, it was documented in 1931 by a French scholar named George Coedès. Assigned the identifying label K-127, the inscription reads like a bill of sale and includes references to slaves, five pairs of oxen and sacks of white rice. Though some of the writing wasn’t deciphered, the inscription clearly bore the date 605 in an ancient calendar that began in the year A.D. 78. Its date was thus A.D. 683. Two centuries older than the one at Gwalior, it predated wide-ranging Arab trade.


http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/d9/33/d9338ecd-6597-4cd9-bb3d-8cf26e7999ce/mark-zero-phenom.jpg__800x600_q85_crop.jpg
"This inscription, written in Old Khmer, reads “The Caka era reached year 605 on the fifth day of the waning moon.” The dot (at right) is now recognized as the oldest known version of our zero."

soulblighter
12-04-2014, 06:16 PM
A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation Vasant Shinde et.al.

Abstract
A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure reveals detail such as pitting, microcrystalline structure, and corrosion, consistent with ancient cast copper artifacts. Given the relative fineness of the engraving, it is hypothesised that the copper plates were not used as seals, but have characteristics consistent with use in copper plate printing. As such, it is possible that these copper plates are by far the earliest known printing devices, being at least 4000 years old.

http://www.ancient-asia-journal.com/article/view/aa.12317/97

parasar
12-04-2014, 06:54 PM
A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation Vasant Shinde et.al.

Abstract
A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure reveals detail such as pitting, microcrystalline structure, and corrosion, consistent with ancient cast copper artifacts. Given the relative fineness of the engraving, it is hypothesised that the copper plates were not used as seals, but have characteristics consistent with use in copper plate printing. As such, it is possible that these copper plates are by far the earliest known printing devices, being at least 4000 years old.

http://www.ancient-asia-journal.com/article/view/aa.12317/97



the millions of bricks have survived poorly, as many have been recycled or have eroded to rubble.


This made me recollect one of the greatest of archaeological faux pas, by the eminent Bhandarkar. :)
D.R. Bhandarkar, 1911—12, Superintending Archaeologist of the Western Circle of the Archaeological Survey of India, in his report:


I was greatly disappointed ...
not representing the remains of ... any ancient monument
According to local tradition, these are the ruins of a town only two hundred years old ... This seems not incorrect, because the bricks here found are of the modern type ...

soulblighter
12-04-2014, 06:58 PM
This made me recollect one of the greatest of archaeological faux pas, by the eminent Bhandarkar. :)
D.R. Bhandarkar, 1911—12, Superintending Archaeologist of the Western Circle of the Archaeological Survey of India, in his report:

If those copper plates were indeed used for printing, what were they printing giant seals for? It seems weird that they would be for mass producing works of art. Maybe edicts from "central command" to far flung areas?
I find it interesting that the same couple of figures re-appear all over the place on different things.

parasar
12-04-2014, 08:03 PM
If those copper plates were indeed used for printing, what were they printing giant seals for? It seems weird that they would be for mass producing works of art. Maybe edicts from "central command" to far flung areas?
I find it interesting that the same couple of figures re-appear all over the place on different things.

No idea.
To me it actually looks like a copper plate inscription often used for land grants, etc.
http://www.ancient-asia-journal.com/article/viewFile/63/97/721

Sohgaura copper plate inscription:
http://books.google.com/books?id=0lGVpLBY3XIC&pg=PA510
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VWf9jPG1RGc/Uc0WsN138yI/AAAAAAAAa_c/XYYGIo_fU7M/s415/sohgaura.jpg

parasar
12-04-2014, 09:55 PM
No idea.
To me it actually looks like a copper plate inscription often used for land grants, etc.
http://www.ancient-asia-journal.com/article/viewFile/63/97/721

Sohgaura copper plate inscription:
http://books.google.com/books?id=0lGVpLBY3XIC&pg=PA510
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VWf9jPG1RGc/Uc0WsN138yI/AAAAAAAAa_c/XYYGIo_fU7M/s415/sohgaura.jpg

Egbert Richter-Ushanas reads the pictographic invocation of the Sohgaura inscription as follows:


Like the plants (2) in the storehouse (1) the soma (3) standing on the hill (4) may protect us (5), like the plants (6) in the storehouse.


Fleet translates the Brahmi part as:

Notice for all the three great roads for vehicles! At the junction, (named) Manavasi; of the three roads, in actually (the villages) Dasilimata and Usagama, these two storehouses are prepared for the sheltering of loads of commodities of (i.e., from and to) Tiyavani, Mathula, and Chamchu,-— to meet any case of urgent need, but not for permanent use!

soulblighter
12-05-2014, 12:39 AM
Egbert Richter-Ushanas reads the pictographic invocation of the Sohgaura inscription as follows:


Fleet translates the Brahmi part as:


The plate has the longest string of Indus valley "script" ever found. However it is only 34 of them... you think it is sufficient for a land grant decree?

parasar
12-05-2014, 01:34 AM
The plate has the longest string of Indus valley "script" ever found. However it is only 34 of them... you think it is sufficient for a land grant decree?

Not sure if its a grant or an edict or something else, but if the script is pictographic 34 characters should be sufficient.

soulblighter
12-06-2014, 07:27 PM
pictographic? possible. Until now people have been claiming that IVC had no written scripts!

Megalophias
12-07-2014, 04:46 AM
pictographic? possible. Until now people have been claiming that IVC had no written scripts!
That is a minority position, though.

That said, these have no provenance, and I would not give very good odds on their being genuine, unfortunately. Looted artifacts and forgeries are terrible for archaeology; I wish criminals would stick to honest professions like robbing banks. (You can't blame dirt-poor peasants for looting artifacts, but you can certainly blame private collectors for buying them.)

With luck something similar will be dug up from an archaeological site with impeccable provenance. What would be really nice is a bilingual in Sumerian or some such. Fingers crossed.

soulblighter
12-07-2014, 04:16 PM
That is a minority position, though.

That said, these have no provenance, and I would not give very good odds on their being genuine, unfortunately. Looted artifacts and forgeries are terrible for archaeology; I wish criminals would stick to honest professions like robbing banks. (You can't blame dirt-poor peasants for looting artifacts, but you can certainly blame private collectors for buying them.)

With luck something similar will be dug up from an archaeological site with impeccable provenance. What would be really nice is a bilingual in Sumerian or some such. Fingers crossed.

Apparently it passed the sniff test. Same alloy composition with Arsenic, all the grroves and chips have the right kind of patina etc. There is little hope of excavating in Pakistan anymore in the near future, but maybe something in India will show up.

parasar
01-30-2015, 11:02 PM
FWIW:
Dravidian Proof of the Indus Script
via the Rig Veda: A Case Study
http://a.harappa.com/sites/g/files/g65461/f/201411/dravidian-indus.pdf

parasar
10-20-2015, 08:17 PM
http://www.nature.com/news/ancient-civilization-cracking-the-indus-script-1.18587
"Now — as a result of increased collaboration between archaeologists, linguists and experts in the digital humanities — it looks possible that the Indus script may yield some of its secrets ...
The direction of writing — chiefly right to left — has been established by analysis of the positioning of groups of characters in many differing inscriptions. The segmentation of texts containing repeated sequences of characters, syntactic structures, the numeral system and the measuring system are partly understood..
A minority of researchers query whether the Indus script was capable of expressing a spoken language, mainly because of the brevity of inscriptions...
This theory seems unlikely, for various reasons. Notably, sequential ordering and an agreed direction of writing are universal features of writing systems. Such rules are not crucial in symbolic systems. Moreover, the Indus civilization must have been well aware through its trade links of how cuneiform functioned as a full writing system ...

The dissident paper has stimulated some fresh approaches. Wells — a vehement believer that the Indus script is a full writing system — working with the geoinformation scientist Andreas Fuls at the Technical University of Berlin, has created the first, publicly available, electronic corpus of Indus texts (see www.archaeoastronomie.de). Although not complete, it includes all the texts from the US-led Harappa Archaeological Research Project..."

parasar
06-03-2016, 06:33 PM
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/lost-city-cambodia-180958508/?no-ist
The Lost City of Cambodia

Deep in the jungles of southeast Asia, archaeologists have rediscovered the remains of an invisible kingdom that may have been the template for Angkor Wat

"Inscriptions found on temple doors and walls made mention of a splendid hilltop capital called Mahendraparvata (the mountain of the great Indra, king of the gods), and its warrior-priest monarch, Jayavarman II, who organized several independent principalities into a single kingdom in the beginning of the ninth century..."

Jean M
06-04-2016, 09:00 PM
Scientists from the India Institute of Technology in Kharagpur, and the Archaeological Survey of India, have uncovered evidence that the Indus Valley Civilisation is at least 8,000 years old, and that pre-Harappan civilisation existed for at least 1,000 years before this. They also believe climate change ended the civilisation about 3,000 years ago.

Anindya Sarkar, head of the department of geology and geophysics at IIT-Kharagpur, says: "We have recovered perhaps the oldest pottery from the civilisation. We used a technique called 'optically stimulated luminescence' to date pottery shards of the Early Mature Harappan time to nearly 6,000 years ago and the cultural levels of pre-Harappan Hakra phase as far back as 8,000 years."

The team's excavations at an unexplored site - Bhirrana - also yielded large quantities of animal remains like bones, teeth, and horn cores of cow, goat, deer and antelope.

The researchers believe that the Indus Valley Civilisation spread over a vast expanse of the sub-continent. While earlier phases were represented by pastoral and village farming communities, and mature Harappan settlements were highly urbanised with organised cities, a developed material and craft culture, and regular trade with Arabia and Mesopotamia, the Late Harappan phase is characterised by large-scale de-urbanisation, drop in population, abandonment of established settlements, lack of basic amenities, violence, and even the disappearance of the Harappan script.

The study shows that the pre-Harappan humans started inhabiting this area in a climate favourable for settlement and agriculture. "The monsoon was much stronger between 9000 years and 7000 years ago, and probably fed these rivers making them mightier with vast floodplains," explains Arati Deshpande Mukherjee of Deccan College, which helped analyse the finds. The researchers say that, with the declining monsoon, the Indus Valley people shifted their crop patterns from large-grained cereals like wheat and barley to drought-resistant species like rice. As the yield diminished, the organised storage system of the Mature Harappan period gave way to more individual household-based crop processing and storage systems, acting as a catalyst for the gradual decline of the civilisation rather than any abrupt collapse.

Edited from Times of India (29 May 2016)

http://www.stonepages.com/news/archives/005665.html

parasar
07-25-2016, 03:42 AM
China strives to become leader in world of archeology
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2016/07/19/china-leader-world-archeology/86679930/

"BEIJING — When Chinese archaeologists start work on a buried Bronze Age city in north India this fall, they will be breaking ground in more ways than one.

The dig at Rakhigarhi, 90 miles north west of Delhi, will be the largest China has ever had undertaken outside its borders, the clearest sign yet the communist country is emerging as a global power in the field.

It will also be the first time Chinese archaeologists have been allowed to work in India, a country China fought a war against in 1962."

Observer
07-25-2016, 08:31 AM
The dig at Rakhigarhi, 90 miles north west of Delhi, will be the largest China has ever had undertaken outside its borders, the clearest sign yet the communist country is emerging as a global power in the field.

Another study on same site?

parasar
07-25-2016, 06:16 PM
Another study on same site?

Yes same site.
It is a pretty massive site.
And, Sarnath.

Observer
07-26-2016, 02:54 AM
Yes same site.
It is a pretty massive site.
And, Sarnath.

Sarnath? that's interesting. What will study of Sarnath be about? have they actually found any skeletons there?