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Jean M
08-12-2017, 05:02 PM
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28799621
Płoszaj et al., Ancient DNA analysis might suggest external origin of individuals from chamber graves placed in medieval cemetery in Pień, Central Poland, Anthropol Anz. 2017 Aug 11.

ABSTRACT:


The participation of immigrants during early days in Poland of Piast's dynasty is a debated issue among archaeologists and anthropologists alike. Such hypotheses were formulated on the basis of, amongst others, the discovery of early medieval chamber graves characterized by construction features typical of the Scandinavian culture area. Archaeological and anthropological studies to date have not provided an unequivocal answer as to whether the individuals interred in those graves were autochthons who adopted a different burial rite, or perhaps immigrants from foreign lands. To characterize the gene pool of this population we analyzed the C/T allele of the nuclear gene LCT-13910 as well as fragments of the mitochondrial genome from individuals buried in very richly furnished chamber graves at the medieval cemetery in Pień. The obtained results for the nuclear allele and mtDNA do not corroborate the Scandinavian origin of the analyzed population. Moreover, we did not find haplogroup I, which is the one typical of populations that historically inhabited the north of Europe; and the frequency of the LCT-13910 T allele was similar to that of past and present Polish populations. On the other hand, we identified the atypical haplogroup C5c1, which suggests Asian origin of the studied individuals and confirms our previous reports concerning ancient human migrations from Asia to the territory of present-day Poland. While our findings do not conclusively disprove a Scandinavian lineage of the studied population, they certainly shed some new light on the origin of the individuals buried in chamber graves, which may be very different from the one initially proposed by archaeologists.

lgmayka
08-12-2017, 08:23 PM
The Polish Project mtDNA page (https://www.familytreedna.com/public/polish?iframe=mtresults) has several C5c1a examples (two marked as such, and a couple more which appear to match them but are marked only as C).

An interesting question is: Where else in Europe is C5c1 found? Unfortunately, FTDNA's mtDNA C Project (https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/c-haplogroup-mt-dna/dna-results) does not publish its results. :(

The mtDNA phylotree (http://phylotree.org/tree/M8.htm) has only 3 official examples of C5c1/C5c1a:

Polish (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/FJ951452)
Ethnic Russian from Uzbekistan (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/JN315676)
Polish (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/FJ951605)

George
08-12-2017, 09:56 PM
The Polish Project mtDNA page (https://www.familytreedna.com/public/polish?iframe=mtresults) has several C5c1a examples (two marked as such, and a couple more which appear to match them but are marked only as C).

An interesting question is: Where else in Europe is C5c1 found? Unfortunately, FTDNA's mtDNA C Project (https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/c-haplogroup-mt-dna/dna-results) does not publish its results. :(

The mtDNA phylotree (http://phylotree.org/tree/M8.htm) has only 3 official examples of C5c1/C5c1a:

Polish (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/FJ951452)
Ethnic Russian from Uzbekistan (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/JN315676)
Polish (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/FJ951605)

Mielnik-Sikorska et al. mention other European locations in their 2013 article in PLoS One. 2013: 8(1): e54360. Google haplogroup C5c1 for the link

Tomenable
09-06-2017, 01:29 AM
Nothing indicates that people buried there were recent immigrants from Siberia:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?97-Genetic-Genealogy-and-Ancient-DNA-in-the-News/page156&p=277811#post277811

lukaszM
09-08-2017, 10:40 AM
Nothing indicates that people buried there were recent immigrants from Siberia:

http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?97-Genetic-Genealogy-and-Ancient-DNA-in-the-News/page156&p=277811#post277811

Oh even not in this case but some Khazars or Kumans (for example Komańcza in Bieszczady) could enter Polish population but of course on indvidual level (captives for example). Nothing strange.

Waldemar
11-01-2017, 12:46 PM
Nevertheless, some subclusters of haplogroup C, like C5c1 clade was reported to occur almost exclusively in Europe. C5c1 haplogroup was previously observed in three Poles, four Europeans, one Russian, one Caucasian and one person of unknown origin. In this study we present an additional haplotype belonging to C5c1 clade, which was found in the Ukrainian mtDNA pool. As the components of the C5c1 haplogroup are virtually absent in Asia and were reported only in the populations of Central Europe, the previous hypothesis by Derenko et al. that the C5c1 clade might be a marker of Siberian ancestry in Central European populations could be further supported by the results of this study. Thus, the presence of C5c1 clade among recent Europeans may reflect their ancient contacts with Asian populations, that could be traced back to the Neolithic period, as the evolutionary age of C5c1 clade was calculated to around 4–9 kya.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544712/


Further investigation reveals that C5c1 is indeed an Eastern European branch, first defined from Polish individuals.

http://fss.xxyy.info/journal/2015/2157118X.5.1.R1.pdf