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Natalie14612
08-03-2013, 07:05 PM
I'm fairly new to autosomal DNA results. My sister and I both did the Family Finder test through FTDNA. We have different fathers. We do know that her father was from Bulgaria with Macedonian heritage. Mom's ancestry was Scottish mostly. Her ancestral origins came back as 50% Western Europe (French, Orcanian- no surprise) and 49% East Asia, specifically Han. My breakdown is 76% Western Europe (French, Orcanian, Spanish, Basque, and Rumanian) and 23% Ashkenazi Jewish.

My questions: why would she have such a large % of East Asian ancestry with no one who is Chinese/Japanese/Korean in her heritage?
Where does the 23% Ashkenazi Jewish heritage come from? Could that be from my father's side? We don't know who our paternal grandfather was but dad grew up in Tazewell, VA and had no known Jewish ancestry.

The more information I get, the more confused I am!

Can anyone help sort this out?

Thanks B)

soulblighter
08-04-2013, 12:16 AM
Two possibilities I guess for your sister:
1. FTDNA mixed up samples or screwed up population finder.
2. Her Bulgarian dad had Asian ancestry.

I recommend downloading the raw data and using a DIY (dodecad or harappaworld) tool to confirm. Unfortunately Gedmatch does not seem to be accepting data or you could've used that.

Regarding your sample, Jewish connection may be from your paternal grandpa. Again try the DIY tools on your raw data as well. Get more people in your family tested if no conclusion.

Natalie14612
08-04-2013, 11:46 AM
We have already downloaded her data to GEDMATCH. I'll run the dodecad and harappaworld and report back.

Her father was from Macedonia/Bulgaria. I wonder if his ancestors migrated from eastern Asia.

Thanks!
Natalie

You replied:
1. FTDNA mixed up samples or screwed up population finder.
2. Her Bulgarian dad had Asian ancestry.

I recommend downloading the raw data and using a DIY (dodecad or harappaworld) tool to confirm. Unfortunately Gedmatch does not seem to be accepting data or you could've used that.

Regarding your sample, Jewish connection may be from your paternal grandpa. Again try the DIY tools on your raw data as well. Get more people in your family tested if no conclusion.[/QUOTE]