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paoloferrari
08-31-2017, 04:59 PM
The Biogeographic Origins of Novelty-Seeking Traits

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/105054/1/V-366-14.pdf

"Abstract
This paper empirically investigates the biogeographic determinants of the human DRD4
exon III locus, a particular gene variant associated with the human
personality trait of novelty-seeking behavior. Providing a novel compilation of worldwide
DRD4 exon III allele frequencies in a large sample of indigenous populations around the world, this study
employs population-specific biogeographic characteristics using high-resolution geospatial
data. The estimates suggest that migratory distance from East Africa naturally selects
for specific novelty-seeking traits, even controlling for a broad range of biogeographic
determinants. Notably, land suitability for pastoral nomadism is significantly related to
DRD4 exon III diversity. This result provides further credence to the general observation
that novelty-seeking traits are quite common in nomadic populations , explaining why some
societies failed to settle and to develop centralized states"

Saetro
09-01-2017, 10:31 PM
The Biogeographic Origins of Novelty-Seeking Traits

https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/105054/1/V-366-14.pdf

"Abstract
This paper empirically investigates the biogeographic determinants of the human DRD4
exon III locus, a particular gene variant associated with the human
personality trait of novelty-seeking behavior. Providing a novel compilation of worldwide
DRD4 exon III allele frequencies in a large sample of indigenous populations around the world, this study
employs population-specific biogeographic characteristics using high-resolution geospatial
data. The estimates suggest that migratory distance from East Africa naturally selects
for specific novelty-seeking traits, even controlling for a broad range of biogeographic
determinants. Notably, land suitability for pastoral nomadism is significantly related to
DRD4 exon III diversity. This result provides further credence to the general observation
that novelty-seeking traits are quite common in nomadic populations , explaining why some
societies failed to settle and to develop centralized states"

That was his 2014 paper.
He has followed up recently with The persistent effects of novelty-seeking traits on comparative economic development http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304387816301171 (pay wall).
This is presumably the modern equivalent application of the earlier work.

Abstract
The issue of novelty-seeking traits have been related to important economic attitudes such as risk-taking, entrepreneurial, and explorative behaviors that foster technological progress and, thus, economic development. However, numerous molecular genetic studies have shown that novelty-seeking bearing individuals are prone to certain psychological “disadvantages” such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), leading to occupational and educational difficulties in modern societies. Using a recent compilation of DRD4 exon III allele frequencies – a particular gene variant that population geneticists have found to be sometimes associated with the human phenotype of novelty-seeking behavior – this paper advances a new country-level measure on the prevalence of novelty-seeking traits for a large number of countries worldwide. The results suggest a stable non-monotonic inverted U-shaped relationship between the country-level DRD4 exon III allele frequency measure and economic development. This finding is suggestive of the potential “benefits” and “costs” of novelty-seeking traits for the aggregate economy.

His comment on ADHD reminds us that many traits we consider beneficial to the community, if genetic, will inevitably result in individuals who have more or less of the gene than is optimal.