PDA

View Full Version : Anyone Else C4a1a?



Searcher
09-11-2017, 08:21 PM
Hi there, I was born in Canada but my mother is Bangladesh. From the looks of it C4* mtDNA is present among South Asian populations and I am C4a1a. Which other regions have this particular strand?

lgmayka
09-12-2017, 12:34 AM
This project (https://www.familytreedna.com/public/polish?iframe=mtresults) has someone of Russian ancestry (Yaroslavl (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaroslavl)) belonging to C4a1a6.

soulblighter
09-12-2017, 01:26 AM
Hi there, I was born in Canada but my mother is Bangladesh. From the looks of it C4* mtDNA is present among South Asian populations and I am C4a1a. Which other regions have this particular strand?

Here (http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/c4a_genbank_sequences.htm) you go.

Do you have the T195C mutation under C4a1a? This is present in Kashmir (http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/lists/sharma2017-1.htm) and Tamil Nadu, as well as siberia, mongolia, turkey and russia.

The C4a1a1a - C3576T A4884G A4958G is in Tibetan populations from NE India and Nepal.

Reza
09-12-2017, 10:26 PM
Hi there, I was born in Canada but my mother is Bangladesh. From the looks of it C4* mtDNA is present among South Asian populations and I am C4a1a. Which other regions have this particular strand?

There's another Bengali chap I know with C4a4 mtdna. From Sylhet originally.

Ashina
02-26-2021, 10:21 PM
43563Turkish C4a1a4a* here.

https://www.yfull.com/mtree/C4a1a4a*/

Ashina
03-02-2021, 01:14 AM
The MA2195 Ottoman woman was C4a1a4a too! :D

43630

Agamemnon
03-10-2021, 02:37 AM
In case you've missed it, three of the Khazar samples from Tatarinova et al. (https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2019.12.15.876912v1.full) were C4:


https://i.imgur.com/epX1zOY.png

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/biorxiv/early/2019/12/16/2019.12.15.876912/F2.large.jpg?width=800&height=600&carousel=1

Samples 656 and 1986 are (going off STRs) C-M217 (https://www.yfull.com/tree/C-M217/) and R-Y9 (https://www.yfull.com/tree/R-Y9/) respectively.

Here's more information on those samples from the supplement:

Sample 166
This family of Kurgans is in the Martynivsky district of the Rostov region; it was excavated in
1982. Sample 166 is the primary burial in Kurgan 37. The remains were of a female, aged 25 -
30 years. The grave is of the pit type with a niche in the southern wall. Fortunately, the grave
was not robbed and contained multiple items, including pieces of ironwork and stirrups. The
burial is dated between the second half of the VIIIth century and early IXth century.

Sample 656
This sample was excavated from the Verbovy log IX site, kurgan 3, burial 1. This site is near
the Verbovy Log Farm of Dubovsky district of the Rostov region located on the left bank of
the Don (now the left bank of the Tsimlyansk reservoir). Kurgan 3 was excavated by the
expedition of the Rostov State University (Rostov-on-Don) in 1989. The height of the kurgan
was 0.24 m. The square below the square was surrounded by a square trench measuring 14.5 x
12 m. Burial 1 is the pit type with a niche in the southern wall. In the grave, there was a male
skeleton (30 - 35 years), likely Caucasoid in appearance. The burial has not been robbed.

At the bottom of the grave, there was an incomplete skeleton of the horse, the skull and the
limbs. There were iron stirrups, iron buckle, iron arrowheads, iron quiver hook, quiver loops,
fragments of iron blade weapons (probably a broadsword with a handle decorated with silver
lining), and with ivory lining. An oval-shaped, silver belt buckle was also found. In the
mouth of the deceased was half of the Byzantine gold coin from the second reign of Emperor
Justinian II (705-711 AD). Typical Turkic runes were scratched on the surface of the coin.
There were also coin-like discs similar in size to the Byzantine coin. Therefore, the burial is
dated to the first third of the VIIIth century, and not before 705. This work has not been fully
published.

Sample 1986
Kurgan burial ground Talovy II is in the Orlovsky district of the Rostov region. It was
excavated in 2004 by the expedition of the Archaeological Research Bureau, Rostov-on-Don.
Sample 1986 was the primary grave of Kurgan 3. It belonged to a male, aged 35 - 45 years.
The man was buried along with a horse and a camel. The grave is of the pit type with niches in
the southern and western walls. The burial was not robbed, providing multiple artifacts,
including arrowheads, ivory bow overlays, and a flail. The main finding is a reliquary made
from a carved deer antler, showing combat scenes between a rider and a foot soldier.
Considering the item’s complexity and level of craftsmanship, it is a rare find worldwide, and
the only one found in the Lower Don area. The burial is dated between the second half of the
VIIIth- and early IXth century.

Shuzam87
04-01-2021, 11:44 AM
Hi there! My grandpa on my maternal side has C4a1a3d http://https://www.yfull.com/mtree/C4a1a3d/ according to 23mofang, a Chinese DNA company. However, after checking all the mutations it could be C4a1a-a2 since he also got the C6563T mutation. http://https://www.yfull.com/mtree/C4a1a-a2/. He does not have the T195C mutation.

parasar
04-01-2021, 11:57 PM
In case you've missed it, three of the Khazar samples from Tatarinova et al. (https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2019.12.15.876912v1.full) were C4:
... 1986 are (going off STRs) ... R-Y9 respectively.

...

Sample 1986
...

It seems that C4 and R1a have been together for some time.
Most of the Xiaohe R1axZ93 samples were mtdna C4.

111
223-298-309-327 C4
R1a1a

115
298-327 C4
R1a1a

120
189-192-311 R* ("The results showed that they are related neither to the West Eurasian haplogroups UK, TJ, HV, R11 and R1, nor to the East Eurasian haplogroups B and F. So we designated them as haplogroup R* temporarily.")
R1a1a

121
183-189-192-311 R*
R1a1a

136
298-327 C4
R1a1a

139
298-327 C4
R1a1a

"The U7 variant observed in Xiaohe is currently found mostly in Iran, Europe and the Tibetan plateau. In addition, we found one individual with the Indian lineage M5 [48]. Nowadays, the M5 variant observed in this study is found mainly in south and southwest Asia. The presence of hgs U7 and M5 in the Xiaohe people suggests that populations of west/south Asia contributed to the gene pool of the Tarim Basin during the Bronze Age. The most dominant east Eurasian haplogroup in the Xiaohe people was C, found in 18 of the 36 individuals (47 %) and associated with five distinct mtDNA C4 haplotypes and one C5 haplotype. Nine Xiaohe individuals carried the variant 16223-16298-16309-16327 and five carried the variant 16298–16327. The first of these variants, 16223-16298-16309-16327, has to our knowledge not been previously observed in ancient or living populations, while the variant 16298–16327 was only observed in present-day Siberia, although at low frequencies [49–51]. A variant characterised by substitutions 16223-16298-16327, observed in one Xiaohe individual, is found widely in present-day Eurasia, with the highest frequency in central/eastern Siberia. It also been detected in a number of ancient individuals, three from Neolithic central Siberia [43], one from northeast Siberia (3600 yBP) [52], six from northeast Europe (3500yBP) [37], twelve from the Bronze Age West Siberian Plain [53], one from southern Xinjing(2800-2011yBP) [54] and four from late Neolithic northwest China [55]. Haplotype 16129-16223-16298-16327 is found mainly in currently northeast, central and south Siberian populations, in Mongolia and central Asia. It also was found in one ancient Mongolian (2000 yBP) [56]. Haplotype 16093-16129-16223-16298-16311-16327 is probably rare, since it has only been detected previously in four present-day individuals, one in south Siberia, one in Tibet, one in Southeast Asia, and one in China. One Xiaohe individual carried Hg C5 (16223-16288-16298-327), of a variant only observed previously in one individual of southern Siberia, and in one of the Tibetan Plateau (Fig. 3b).

The second most frequent east Eurasian haplogroup in the Xiaohe people was D, found in four individuals, with four different variants. The first, 16051-16223-16362, is found mainly in Southeast Asia. The second, 16223-16234-16316-16362, is found throughout the Eurasian continent, including China, Japan, Siberia, and Eastern Europe."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495690/

Shuzam87
04-03-2021, 11:51 AM
you can check all the C4a1a ancient DNA samples here on this website (including downstream subclades):https://haplotree.info/maps/ancient_dna/samples.php?searchcolumn=mtDNA_haplogroup&searchfor=C4A1A&ybp=500000,0

Ashina
04-15-2021, 10:01 AM
The MA2195 Ottoman woman was C4a1a4a too! :D

43630Correction: this sample was falsely labeled as C4a1a4a (I think she belonged to a different subclade of C4 or C5).

Shuzam87
05-25-2021, 08:38 PM
Here (http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/c4a_genbank_sequences.htm) you go.

Do you have the T195C mutation under C4a1a? This is present in Kashmir (http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/lists/sharma2017-1.htm) and Tamil Nadu, as well as siberia, mongolia, turkey and russia.

The C4a1a1a - C3576T A4884G A4958G is in Tibetan populations from NE India and Nepal.

C4a1a+T195C was also found in an Indian Iyer individual GA001089 among the GenomeAsia 100K samples : https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1793-z

Shuzam87
05-25-2021, 08:45 PM
I believe that C4a1a probably had a Siberian/Northern Asian origin and was spread into Europe with the EHG expansion