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firemonkey
09-24-2017, 12:15 AM
My 2gt Joseph Bowman was born c 1854 to Joseph Bowman and Jane Clark. Unfortunately I can find no record in IGI of his birth or his parent's marriage.

I've looked at "Bowman and Clark households in Griffith's Valuation." at https://www.johngrenham.com and got the following -

1856-7 7 Shankill(Belfast city)
1856-7 2 Kirkinriola (Antrim)
1851-3 2 Marmullane (Cork)
1863-4 2 Dromore(Down)

Clark appears once in each parish.

I am not sure if this is the right way to go about things to narrow possibilities. I am presuming my 3gt families would have lived near to each other.

I have seen one Ancestry tree with my Joseph Bowman which suggests he was born Cork but the father listed died in 1890. I know from records obtained from his bigamous marriage to my 2gt Mary Braidwood in 1876 both his parents were deceased by that time.

Baltimore1937
09-26-2017, 01:51 AM
I have three pages at Ancestry with Bowman in their trees. Two are 4th cousins, but are locked (private). The others are all distant cousins. I noticed one Bowman goes back to Germany. Most of the trees I looked at don't go back very far. They were mostly southern USA. On the other hand, I remember that Bowman dairy in Madison, Wisconsin that prided themselves with their 100% Guernsey cows. Guernseys give milk richer in cream than ordinary Holsteins. Their outlet store served the best malted-milkshakes in town! That was back in 1950.

msmarjoribanks
04-27-2018, 03:58 PM
Happened upon this when looking for a different thread.

I'm sure it's unrelated, but I'm interested in a Bowman -- Jesse Bowman, an innkeeper who apparently lived in Cook County, Illinois in the early 1850s and perhaps developed a Chicago neighborhood now known as Bowmanville (northern bit of Lincoln Square). It wasn't part of Chicago until later (1889).

There's a story that is always repeated when Bowmanville comes up (which it doesn't much, granted, but I live there). Specifically, some version of this: "Bowmanville, a small neighborhood in the Lincoln Square community area, was first developed in 1850s by a local innkeeper named Jesse Bowman. Not one to follow the rules, Bowman made the cart paths and forest near present-day Foster and Ravenswood Avenues his own, laying claim to many of the plots of land in the area without actually owning them. He then sold the land -- that wasn't his -- to unwitting buyers, and disappeared before the new 'owners' discovered that he did not actually own the land he had sold."

I recently got interested in this for my own reasons, and can't find any sources for this story (admittedly I have not looked exhaustively at all, but it just seems to be accepted local legend), and also haven't found a matching Jesse Bowman (or anyone likely to be him) in the 1840, 1850, or 1860 censuses in Cook County.

I searched for newspaper stories, and other than ones in 2010 and 2012 with the story I know, there's one in 1954 that has a different version, not including the fraud:

"It was in the early 1850s that Jesse Bowman bought land between Foster and Lawrence avs. from Western av. to California av. and laid out two subdivisions and the area became known as Bowmanville. Early settlement amounted to a few frame houses, a hotel, a store, and a disproportionate number of saloons. After all, it was the sip-and-social center of market bound truck farmers from "dry" districts from both the north and south."

On 1800s maps of the area, Bowmanville definitely was located where the 1954 paper says, and not in its current location (they are proximate to each other, but the older location was just west of the current location and in a different township). The newer story has it in the current location, with the eastern boundary at Ravenswood, not Western. I'm thus wondering again about the source of the newer story and if maybe Jesse Bowman can be rehabilitated.

Dewsloth
04-27-2018, 04:53 PM
I have three pages at Ancestry with Bowman in their trees. Two are 4th cousins, but are locked (private). The others are all distant cousins. I noticed one Bowman goes back to Germany. Most of the trees I looked at don't go back very far. They were mostly southern USA. On the other hand, I remember that Bowman dairy in Madison, Wisconsin that prided themselves with their 100% Guernsey cows. Guernseys give milk richer in cream than ordinary Holsteins. Their outlet store served the best malted-milkshakes in town! That was back in 1950.

I have Baughmanns in my tree. My 5th Great grandmother was Susannah Baughmann b. 1732 who left Zurich (then part of Bavaria) with her parents and siblings and married Valentine Cook (in PA?) and then moved (along with at least some of her family) to [W.] Virginia.
https://www.geni.com/people/Capt-Valentine-Cook/6000000006452701664

It seems there were quite a few Baughmann/Bowmans around:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bowman_(pioneer)

Also:

The Christian Bowman FamilyGEORGE W. BOWMAN
If it is important that church and state keep careful records of historical facts and incidents, it is vitally more important that the family, the greatest of the three and the foundation of the others, keep careful records. Family Bibles fade and become illegible, fall to pieces, and are lost to posterity. It is a great satisfaction to trace one's forebears back to the time when the land was a trackless wilderness and ascertain to which branch of those early pioneers one belongs, how he is related to the others, and from what type of stock he is descended. Henry Ward Beecher said: "The dry branches of genealogical trees bear many pleasant and curious fruits for those who know how to search after them."

The surname Baumann (Bowman) is a common one in German -speaking countries. There have been several changes in the spelling of the name from medieval times to the present. For instance, Buman was used until 1617; then Buwman and Bouwann, until 1650; and later Baumann or Bauman. This last spelling was changed to Bowman in the case of early American members of the family as English officials, in entering court records of legal documents, spelled the Bau as it sounded—that is, Bow. Baughman, Boughman, and Bachman are less frequent spellings.

All of the early emigrant Baumanns were Palatines of Swiss- German origin, coming from the Rhine district. Although there are records in the early eighteenth century of the landing of relatively few members of this family, Wendell, Christian, George, Daniel, and Hans are mentioned. From 1750 on, the name appears frequently. The lives of those mentioned are closely connected; their sources, arrivals, religion, locations, and dealings being closely associated, as records prove.

In July, [1]710, about 3,000 Palatines, having migrated to Ireland , were sent to New York as bond servants of the crown under Governor Robert Hunter. They settled at Livingston Manor and on the opposite side of the Hudson at Saugerities or Schoharie, a tract voluntarily presented to Queen Anne by Indian sachems for the homeless Palatines. Because of their condition of servitude at the first two places mentioned and because of refusal to let them leave, some fifty families fled to Schorie in the fall of 1712 and the rest followed in March, 1713. Hardly established in the several settlements, they again found themselves in trouble with the "Gentleman in Albany ." Continual conflicts made life a burden in Schorie; and despairing of justice in 1722, a large number accepted offers from Pennsylvania to settle there.

About two-thirds of the Schoharie people were not willing to buy land or settle on the Mohawk at the Governor's pleasure, so they started for Pennsylvania . From Schoharie they cut through the forests to the head waters of the Susquehana, working down the river to the mouth of the Swatara and then ascended this river to the mouth of the Tulpehocken, where they settled. This was then the most remote outpost of white colonization in Pennsylvania . During this period many other Palatines sailed directly from Rotterdam and Amsterdam or came on ships touching these ports en route from England and bound for New York, Boston , or Philadelphia . Some setting out for one destination landed at another after many weary weeks of buffeting.

Jost (Joist) Hite (Heydt), setting out from Strassburg, the principal town of Alsace in 1710, landed at New York with sixteen families in Brigatine Swift and Schooner Friendship, ships built or purchased by Hite for this journey. They then went to Kingston. In 1716 or 1717 Hite and the families with him settled at Germantown , near Philadelphia . Becoming angry with the Governor of the province, partly because he would not give protection from the Indians, Hite purchased land in 1731 from the Van -Meters in Virginia , and, in 1732, he with his family, his sons-in-law, Jacob Chrisman, George Bowman and their families started from York, Pennsylvania , for the Shenan-doah Valley of Virginia —sixteen family groups in all. Other families were migrating to the Valley. Christian Bowman entered land in 1731 or 1732. Cutting their road through the forests, they crossed the Potomac near Harper's Ferry and entered the rich and beautiful valley. Hite settled near Winchester ; Christian Bowman, near Edenburg; some, near the present Stephens City; and others, at distances of a few miles apart down the valley. The later towns of Strasburg and Shepherdstown were founded by Peter Stover and a man named Shepherd or Schaeffer.1

Christian Bowman, ancestor of the writer, was a native of the vineyard section of the Rhenish Palatinate. According to word of mouth, he and George Bowman, Hite's son-in-law, and probably Wendell Bowman, were related. So far the parentage of Christian has not been established nor the name of his wife ascertained. Tradition tells us that Christian and George came from York ( Pennsylvania ) into the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia at the same time and perhaps they had been together throughout their travels. Court records show the purchase of land by Christian Bowman in May 1737; probate records show his will in 1764 and there are other ferefences to him and his neighbors.
https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Eo7gpxQCHrEJ:https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/imh/article/download/7031/7775+&cd=10&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

Dewsloth
04-27-2018, 05:02 PM
My 2gt Joseph Bowman was born c 1854 to Joseph Bowman and Jane Clark. Unfortunately I can find no record in IGI of his birth or his parent's marriage.

I've looked at "Bowman and Clark households in Griffith's Valuation." at https://www.johngrenham.com and got the following -

1856-7 7 Shankill(Belfast city)
1856-7 2 Kirkinriola (Antrim)
1851-3 2 Marmullane (Cork)
1863-4 2 Dromore(Down)

Clark appears once in each parish.

I am not sure if this is the right way to go about things to narrow possibilities. I am presuming my 3gt families would have lived near to each other.

I have seen one Ancestry tree with my Joseph Bowman which suggests he was born Cork but the father listed died in 1890. I know from records obtained from his bigamous marriage to my 2gt Mary Braidwood in 1876 both his parents were deceased by that time.

See the bolded part in the quote above: I think it points to the source of many Bowmans in Ireland.

firemonkey
04-27-2018, 07:34 PM
Unfortunately I can see no bolded part.

Dewsloth
04-27-2018, 07:51 PM
Unfortunately I can see no bolded part.

In July, [1]710, about 3,000 Palatines, having migrated to Ireland