PDA

View Full Version : Autosomal results don't match mitochondrial and Y-chromosome results



GG69
10-12-2017, 08:30 PM
I've got my Living DNA results today and the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results differ significantly from the autosomal DNA results. Since the autosomal results are a combination of my mothers and fathers lines I would expect them to show some similarity to the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results in terms of the frequencies in different parts of the world/UK etc. Or am I being naive?
Can anyone clarify this?

C J Wyatt III
10-12-2017, 08:34 PM
I've got my Living DNA results today and the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results differ significantly from the autosomal DNA results. Since the autosomal results are a combination of my mothers and fathers lines I would expect them to show some similarity to the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results in terms of the frequencies in different parts of the world/UK etc. Or am I being naive?
Can anyone clarify this?

Say if your go back 8 generations, you have 256 possible lines. The paternal and maternal lines represent just two of them.

Jack

greerpalmer
10-13-2017, 04:50 PM
I've got my Living DNA results today and the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results differ significantly from the autosomal DNA results. Since the autosomal results are a combination of my mothers and fathers lines I would expect them to show some similarity to the mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome results in terms of the frequencies in different parts of the world/UK etc. Or am I being naive?
Can anyone clarify this?

Common misconception GG69. Y and M Haplogroups go back thousands, or tens of thousands of years in many cases. If you're comparing your haplogroup maps to your autosomal maps, I would expect some significant changes, not to mention the maps you're looking at likely do not go down to your deepest subclad.

For example, I'm Northwestern European and my Haplogroup is E-V13. If you look at a map of E it will show almost all African populations. If you look at E-V13 it will be predominately Balkan. If you look at the different branches off of E-V13 they range from England to Russia.

And lastly, as CJ mentioned, this is one individual in hundreds of thousands of individuals that have contributed to your dna. After 10 generations traces of autosomal dna from that individual can easily be nonexistant.

GG69
10-13-2017, 08:47 PM
Common misconception GG69. Y and M Haplogroups go back thousands, or tens of thousands of years in many cases. If you're comparing your haplogroup maps to your autosomal maps, I would expect some significant changes, not to mention the maps you're looking at likely do not go down to your deepest subclad.

For example, I'm Northwestern European and my Haplogroup is E-V13. If you look at a map of E it will show almost all African populations. If you look at E-V13 it will be predominately Balkan. If you look at the different branches off of E-V13 they range from England to Russia.

And lastly, as CJ mentioned, this is one individual in hundreds of thousands of individuals that have contributed to your dna. After 10 generations traces of autosomal dna from that individual can easily be nonexistant.

So basically the autosomal markers reflect ones more recent ancestry whilst the mitochondrial and Y chromosome ones reflect more distant ancestry. Is that correct?

spruithean
10-13-2017, 09:01 PM
So basically the autosomal markers reflect ones more recent ancestry whilst the mitochondrial and Y chromosome ones reflect more distant ancestry. Is that correct?

Yes, but the mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups reflect only two ancestral lines, your maternal grandfather will have a different Y-chromosome haplogroup than you and your paternal grandmother will have a different mitochondrial haplogroup than you.

Dewsloth
10-13-2017, 09:10 PM
So basically the autosomal markers reflect ones more recent ancestry whilst the mitochondrial and Y chromosome ones reflect more distant ancestry. Is that correct?

Autosomal reflects more ancestry across a broader span of ancestors. Y and mtDNA show only two lines' info (but more specific):
You have 32 4th Great Grandfathers, but only one of them is giving you the Y-line. 7 generations later, you may have some autosomal results from any or all of the 32 (plus your 32 4th Great Grandmothers).

GG69
10-16-2017, 07:25 PM
Many thanks for clarifying matters. I am off to a family reunion in a couple of weeks and hope to show them my results and explain things to them.
I was a NHS Clinical Biochemist who once used to be involved in mtDNA (and autosomal DNA) analysis but it was aimed at diagnosing mtDNA and autosomal gene medical disorders. The science of population tracking is new to me!