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Lara101
11-04-2017, 10:11 PM
Is there a linkage between the two? Most Indians prefer spicy food, and South Indians in general eat the most spice. My mom at home makes Uttar Pradeshi dishes and her food is also pretty spicy! Mainly Uttar Pradesh and southwards, people eat the most spice. NW indians like Punjabies, Sindhis, Gujaraties etc..eat less spice, compared to their eastern and southern neighbours

kush
11-04-2017, 11:04 PM
I don't think there's a huge link imo. I mean a lot of asian cuisines have spicy food. I'm south indian from andhra and we are known to have the spiciest food in the subcontinent. I struggled to eat some thai curry dishes couple of times which were extremely spicy compared to a lot of south indian dishes. It probs just depends on what you grew up with, and how you adapted, etc..

MonkeyDLuffy
11-04-2017, 11:35 PM
NW Indian/Pakistani cuisine is a bit sweet and dry, reason why we eat more roti and less rice. We don’t use crazy spices like south Indians, but nice amount of green chillies.

kakiasumi
11-05-2017, 01:18 AM
I have noticed that too. Punjabis use so much Chillies, oils and spices that I simply cant bear. Pashtoons do use but atleast u can eat their food. I have travelled a few times to Rawalpindi, Gujrat and Faisalabad. I had to eat biscuits as the food in the hotels were too spicy for me. I don't know how you people digest it.

Lara101
11-05-2017, 05:10 AM
I have noticed that too. Punjabis use so much Chillies, oils and spices that I simply cant bear. Pashtoons do use but atleast u can eat their food. I have travelled a few times to Rawalpindi, Gujrat and Faisalabad. I had to eat biscuits as the food in the hotels were too spicy for me. I don't know how you people digest it.

And that Punjabi food is nothing in front of central indian and south indian foods, thats why i think it is genetic, we indians essily digest it. the more south you go, the more spicier it gets.

Lara101
11-05-2017, 05:12 AM
NW Indian/Pakistani cuisine is a bit sweet and dry, reason why we eat more roti and less rice. We don’t use crazy spices like south Indians, but nice amount of green chillies.

The sweeter is what i dont like, this is why im not a fan of butter chicken. I like central and south indian much more, we UP people also use a lot of spice

Lara101
11-05-2017, 05:15 AM
Ya Thai can be very spicy (some dishes) but chettinad Tamil cuisine is more. I havent tried too much Andhra food, except some Hyderabadi food, which is very tasty

SWAHILLI_PRINCE16
11-05-2017, 12:34 PM
I think it has more to do with the culture you grow up in than the genes. Culturally speaking in the city i grew up in Mombasa there were Swahili foods with South Asian influences i ate like bajias, viazi pilipili (spicy potatoes), biryani and pilau with massala. Im used to all the spices because i grew up with these foods.

poi
11-05-2017, 03:02 PM
Aren't chili peppers (the main source for hot and spicy food) spread around the world very recently from South America by colonial Europeans? The "hot and spicy" food before the introduction of chili peppers must have been from very mild, relatively, black peppers and cinnamon. If it is genetic, I do not think anyone but the South American Indians must be inclined to the spicy good.

Lara101
11-05-2017, 03:50 PM
Aren't chili peppers (the main source for hot and spicy food) spread around the world very recently from South America by colonial Europeans? The "hot and spicy" food before the introduction of chili peppers must have been from very mild, relatively, black peppers and cinnamon. If it is genetic, I do not think anyone but the South American Indians must be inclined to the spicy good.

Um no. Indians had spices long before that. Europeans came to India because of spice

BMG
11-05-2017, 05:16 PM
Aren't chili peppers (the main source for hot and spicy food) spread around the world very recently from South America by colonial Europeans? The "hot and spicy" food before the introduction of chili peppers must have been from very mild, relatively, black peppers and cinnamon. If it is genetic, I do not think anyone but the South American Indians must be inclined to the spicy good.
Very true . I don't think there would be any genetic predisposition towards spicy there .If at all the red chillies became important ingredient in Indian cuisine in only last two centuries .
Anyways I cannot bear too much red/green chilly and because of that I dislike those thick spicy gravy type of dishes .

BMG
11-05-2017, 05:20 PM
Um no. Indians had spices long before that. Europeans came to India because of spice
Poi is right .Chili peppers are from South America and introduced to India by portugese

khanabadoshi
11-05-2017, 05:30 PM
Aren't chili peppers (the main source for hot and spicy food) spread around the world very recently from South America by colonial Europeans? The "hot and spicy" food before the introduction of chili peppers must have been from very mild, relatively, black peppers and cinnamon. If it is genetic, I do not think anyone but the South American Indians must be inclined to the spicy good.

Consider this, tomatoes weren't introduced to South Asia until the 1600s via the Portuguese -- probably took a while for places beyond the port cities to start cooking with them. Yet, today, it's the first ingredient you need next to an onion for so many dishes in the region. Red Chilli Peppers probably came with these sailors as well.

On the topic of spices though, people tend to cook with what is grown nearby in their local cuisines. South India, specifically Kerela has been central to the Spice Trade since antiquity, it is natural they would incorporate many spices into their cuisine.

http://cdn.yourarticlelibrary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/clip_image002_thumb47.jpg
http://cdn.yourarticlelibrary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/clip_image004_thumb16.jpg

This data is from the late early-2000s, but it gives you a sense of where it is cultivated.



India is the second largest producer of pepper after Indonesia.
Its distribution is highly concentrated in Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. Kerala produced 60 thousand tonnes (93.95% of India) of pepper in 2002-03.
Though it is produced in almost all the districts of Kerala, the largest production comes from Kannur district, followed by Kottayam, Thiruvananthapuram, Kollam, Kozhikode and Emakulam. Karnataka is a distant second contributing only 3 per cent of the total production of India. Kodagu and Uttar Kannad are the major contributing districts. Tamil Nadu also produces small quantity of pepper.
About one third of total production of pepper finds its way to the foreign markets.





India produces about 90 per cent of the world’s total cardamom.
The entire production comes from three states viz., Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu and these states contribute 53 42 and 5 per cent respectively of the total production of India.
In Kerala, the crop is largely concentrated in the Cardamom hills. Idukki, Palakkad (Palghat), Kozhikode and Kannur are the leading producing districts. In Karnataka the main producing districts are Kodagu, Hassan, Chikmagalur, Uttara and Dakshin Kannad. Madurai is the most outstanding district of Tamil Nadu. This is followed by Salem, Coimbatore, Ramnathpuram, the Nilgiris and Tirunelveli.
About half of the total production is exported.




Although all states of India produce some quantity of chillies, Andhra Pradesh with half of the all India production was the largest producer in 2002-03. Guntur, Warangal, Khammam, East and West Godavari and Prakasam are the main chilli producing districts. Maharashtra and Orissa shared second position, although way behind Andhra Pradesh. The other major producers were Rajasthan, West Bengal, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Assam.
Most of the chillies produced in India are consumed within the country and only 5 to 7 per cent are exported, mainly to Sri Lanka, the USA and Russia.




India is the largest producer of ginger in the world producing about 80 per cent of the world production.
Kerala, Meghalaya, Sikkim, Orissa, Mizoram and West Bengal are the main producing states and account for nearly 84 per cent of the total production of the country. Kerala is the largest producer. In 2002-03, Kerala produced about one-third of the total production of India. Most of it is produced in Kottayam, Kozhikode, Malapuram, Palakkad and Emakulam districts. Meghalaya, Sikkim, Orissa, Mizoram and West Bengal are the other major producing states.
About 80-90 per cent of the total production of ginger is consumed within the country and still India is a major exporter of ginger in the international market and accounts for about half of the total world trade. About 80 per cent of our exports go to the West Asian countries.




Turmeric is the native of the tropical lands of South-East Asia.
Andhra Pradesh is the largest producer, producing about half of the total production of India in 2002-03. Guntur and Cuddapah districts account for two-thirds of the state’s total production. The neighbouring Karnataka state is the second largest producer, producing about 20 per cent of the total production of India. Mysore and Belgaum are outstanding producers.
Third place is occupied by Tamil Nadu, which produced more than 10 per cent turmeric of the country. Coimbatore accounts for 60 per cent of the state’s production. Orissa produced 9.7% where Phulabani and Koraput are the main producing districts. The other producers are Gujarat, West Bengal, Maharashtra, Bihar, Assam and Tripura.
About 90 per cent of the total production is consumed within the country and only 10 per cent is exported.





India is the largest producer of arecanut in the world. In the year 2003-04 India produced 4 lakh tonnes of arecanut from 3 lakh hectares of land. About 40 lakh people who are engaged in cultivating, curing, processing and trading of arecanut earn their livelihood from this nut. Kerala, Karnataka, Tripura, Assam and Meghalya are the major producing states accounting for about 90 per cent of the total output of India. Kerala is the largest producer accounting for 37 per cent of the Indian production.
Kannur, Malappuram, Kollam, Kozhikode and Thrissur are the main producing districts of Kerala. In Karantaka, it is grown in Dakshina Kannada, Uttar Kannada, Chickmagalur, Shimoga and Tumkur districts.
Assam produces about one-fourth of India s arecanut where Kamrup, Sibsagar and Darrang districts are important producers. Ratnagiri and Kolaba districts of Maharashtra, Coimbatore and Salem districts of Tamil Nadu are other important producers. West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh, Goa and Pondicherry also produce some arecanut.
Most of the arecanut is consumed within the country especially in the south Indian states and only a small quantity is exported mainly to Nepal, UAR, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Aman, Kenya and Singapore.


Places that eat more spicy food, grow more spices. Dishes originating in those areas or closer to them are likely to incorporate more spice. Butter Chicken was invented in the UK by an Englishman who decided to incorporate curry powder into making a dish. It's not native to South Asia, and that's why many people probably never grew up hearing about a dish like that. There is a dish similar to it Malai Murgh Handi, chicken cooked in a clay-pot with malai and yoghurt -- but it tastes a bit different and is eaten with a lot of raitha.


A lot of dishes the further west are less spicy, probably because spices aren't as abundant. There is definitely a preference for savory foods over spice, probably because there is a lot of salt in Pakistan. The far north cultivates lots of fruits, nuts, and berries and utilizes this much in cuisine (probably kaikasumi can speak more to this). Also, more central Asian cuisines and flavors are seen, like dumpling-type foods etc. A popular dish in Sarhad is namkeen gosht, literally slow-cooked lamb with salt, a few onions and a green pepper or two tossed in. So certainly some areas do cook with very little spice at all.

Within Pakistan, I think everyone would agree that the Muhajir cuisine is the most spicy and the Punjabi cuisine the most oily. Since most Muhajirs brought their cuisine from Northern India, I have always assumed that North India cooks with considerably more spice than Punjab. I mean, my dad sweats when he eats nihari, but for some reason he likes achaar -- I don't get how that works out, maybe because it was once a mango LOL. I tend to die when I eat an aloo samosa not cooked at home, it's very spicy to me, but most of my family is OK with it, so maybe I just need to grow a little more chest-hair. However, there are exceptions to all this, it's not like its a rule. Chapli kabob in Peshawar is quite spicy. Murgh chargha dishes in Lahore are loaded with red chilli powder. Sindhi biryani is quite spicy.

Probably the spiciest food my mother ever makes is spinach, but we never eat it without yoghurt on the side. Pretty much most dishes in my household involve onion, tomato, olive oil, water, meat, maybe garam masala, some laal mirch, some kaali mirch, some namak, throw in some dhunia, and maybe diced green peppers at some point, wait 20 minutes... baam you have a shorba.... if you added a lot more garam masala and black peppers, wait a little bit longer and reduce out the water...baam.... you got a qorma! Anything potato-related, kasuri mehti is a must! If there is a decent spice level, there is always some yoghurt or raitha with the meal to cool our cowardly palates.


No. Don't listen to me, seriously, I don't know how to cook. LOL.

tl;dr: A lot of our cuisines are relatively modern. Trade, climate, and geography determine a lot more the spice level in our foods than an SNP probably.

BMG
11-05-2017, 05:36 PM
Consider this, tomatoes weren't introduced to South Asia until the 1600s via the Portuguese -- probably took a while for places beyond the port cities to start cooking with them. Yet, today, it's the first ingredient you need next to an onion for so many dishes in the region. Red Chilli Peppers probably came with these sailors as well.

On the topic of spices though, people tend to cook with what is grown nearby in their local cuisines. South India, specifically Kerela has been central to the Spice Trade since antiquity, it is natural they would incorporate many spices into their cuisine.

http://cdn.yourarticlelibrary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/clip_image002_thumb47.jpg
http://cdn.yourarticlelibrary.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/clip_image004_thumb16.jpg

This data is from the late early-2000s, but it gives you a sense of where it is cultivated.













Places that eat more spicy food, grow more spices. Dishes originating in those areas or closer to them are likely to incorporate more spice. Butter Chicken was invented in the UK by an Englishman who decided to incorporate curry powder into making a dish. It's not native to South Asia, and that's why many people probably never grew up hearing about a dish like that. There is a dish similar to it Malai Murgh Handi, chicken cooked in a clay-pot with malai and yoghurt -- but it tastes a bit different and is eaten with a lot of raitha.


A lot of dishes the further west are less spicy, probably because spices aren't as abundant. There is definitely a preference for savory foods over spice, probably because there is a lot of salt in Pakistan. The far north cultivates lots of fruits, nuts, and berries and utilizes this much in cuisine (probably kaikaisumi can speak more to this). Also, more central Asian cuisines and flavors are seen, like dumpling-type foods etc. A popular dish in Sarhad is namkeen gosht, literally slow-cooked lamb with salt, a few onions and a green pepper or two tossed in. So certainly some areas do cook with very little spice at all.

Within Pakistan, I think everyone would agree that the Muhajir cuisine is the most spicy and the Punjabi cuisine the most oily. Since most Muhajirs brought their cuisine from Northern India, I have always assumed that North India cooks with considerably more spice than Punjab. I mean, my dad sweats when he eats nihari. I mean there are exceptions to all this. Chapli kabob in Peshawar is quite spicy. Murgh chargha dishes in Lahore are loaded with red chilli powder. Sindhi biryani is quite spicy.

Probably the spiciest food my mother ever makes is spinach, but we never eat it without yoghurt on the side to counteract the spice. Pretty much most dishes in my household involve onion, tomato, olive oil, water, meat, maybe garam masala, some laal mirch, some kaali mirch, some namak, throw in some dhunia, andmaybe diced green peppersat some point, wait 20 minutes... baam you have a shorba.... if you added a lot more garam masala and black peppers, wait a little bit longer and baam.... you got a qorma! res Anything potato-related, kasuri mehti is a must!


No. Don't listen to me, seriously, I don't know how to cook. LOL.

Khana those peppers grown in Kerala is black peppers which is native to India not Chili peppers

khanabadoshi
11-05-2017, 05:46 PM
Khana those peppers grown in Kerala is black peppers which is native to India not Chili peppers

Yeah I was reading more and learned this, seems to be all black pepper.
However, I still think chilli peppers were brought via Portuguese to Kerala first from the Americas? Basically, I'm implying that if they are going to be popular anywhere in the subcontinent, the main ports they were received at, is a good start.

But chilies are grown in Andhra though, correct? That's what the old paper I got the info from was saying.

"Although all states of India produce some quantity of chillies, Andhra Pradesh with half of the all India production was the largest producer in 2002-03. Guntur, Warangal, Khammam, East and West Godavari and Prakasam are the main chilli producing districts. Maharashtra and Orissa shared second position, although way behind Andhra Pradesh. The other major producers were Rajasthan, West Bengal, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Assam.
Most of the chillies produced in India are consumed within the country and only 5 to 7 per cent are exported, mainly to Sri Lanka, the USA and Russia."

BMG
11-05-2017, 05:56 PM
Yeah I was reading more and learned this, seems to be all black pepper.
However, I still think chilli peppers were brought via Portuguese to Kerala first from the Americas? Basically, I'm implying that if they are going to be popular anywhere in the subcontinent, the main ports they were received at, is a good start.

Yeah we malayalis have to thank Portugese for the main cash crops grown rubber and cashew nut . Also tapioca the nostalgic food for many malayalis were also from South America through Portuguese

Lara101
11-05-2017, 06:41 PM
Poi is right .Chili peppers are from South America and introduced to India by portugese

India has a lot more spices then just chili peppers, here is the list which is native: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Indian_spices

parasar
11-05-2017, 07:00 PM
Yeah we malayalis have to thank Portugese for the main cash crops grown rubber and cashew nut . Also tapioca the nostalgic food for many malayalis were also from South America through Portuguese

Yep potato, tomato, chilies, tapioca, corn, squash, etc. are all American.

https://www.academia.edu/3760984/Looking_at_Indian_food_and_cusine_in_the_past-_a_historicl_analysis
"Around 7000 BCE, sesame, eggplant and humped cattle had been domesticated in the Indus Valley. By 3000 BCE, turmeric,cardamom, black pepper and mustard were harvested in India."

poi
11-05-2017, 07:17 PM
The hotness of spicy food comes from chilipepper, not from other spices. India has been the source of other spices, but NOT hot capsaicin based plants. So, Ancient Indian food has always been relatively bland compared to today.. due to South American origin capsaicin plants spread by colonial Europeans. Therefore, the idea of South Indians having some genetic inclination for hot spicy food is likely not true... but some genes could have mutated in the past few hundred years to make it so?

I personally grew up with bland food, as are Nepali hill foods are in general. But now, in the US, I can eat maxed out hot food from Thai restaurants. I think it is just getting used to capsaicin gradually.

Lara101
11-05-2017, 07:34 PM
Ghost peppers are native to India

Also i have tried many south american foods, they are very bland, i dont think south americans use the spice the same way indians do in their food

poi
11-05-2017, 08:29 PM
Ghost pepper is called Capsicum chinense(irony), which, like all capsaicin based plants, have their origin in the Americas. Peppers , nowadays, are raised everywhere.

South Americans not eating hot spicy food these days don't mean they didn't eat 7000 years ago. Their ancient potteries have traces of chilipeppers. Ancient food for the rest of the world must have been pretty bland compared to today.

surbakhunWeesste
11-05-2017, 08:47 PM
I don't know much about the history of Indian cuisine, haven't overall spicy Indian cuisine been evolving since the British era and perhaps before that?
I know that the spiciest chili pepper is the Naga viper and the spiciest curry dish is Bengali? British Indian? in origin: phall curry? The "garam masala" makes the Indian food spicy as per my amateur Indian cuisine cooking experience, the chillies just provide the "hot" taste.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garam_masala

Is Indian spicy food a product of centuries long melting pot event in a playground called the Indian Sub continent?

MonkeyDLuffy
11-05-2017, 10:13 PM
And that Punjabi food is nothing in front of central indian and south indian foods, thats why i think it is genetic, we indians essily digest it. the more south you go, the more spicier it gets.

It's very subjective. I like Spicy food and I'm positive I can way more hot food than anyone here. Every cuisine has its own taste, saying one is inferior than other, wouldn't be correct. You, from UP background like UP food, similarly a guy from Afghan background likes afghan food.

MonkeyDLuffy
11-05-2017, 10:19 PM
Yep potato, tomato, chilies, tapioca, corn, squash, etc. are all American.

https://www.academia.edu/3760984/Looking_at_Indian_food_and_cusine_in_the_past-_a_historicl_analysis
"Around 7000 BCE, sesame, eggplant and humped cattle had been domesticated in the Indus Valley. By 3000 BCE, turmeric,cardamom, black pepper and mustard were harvested in India."

Corn is what I have hard time believing actually, because corn has been present in the sub continent for long time.

http://www.econ.ohio-state.edu/jhm/arch/maize.html

MonkeyDLuffy
11-05-2017, 10:23 PM
I don't know much about the history of Indian cuisine, haven't overall spicy Indian cuisine been evolving since the British era and perhaps before that?
I know that the spiciest chili pepper is the Naga viper and the spiciest curry dish is Bengali? British Indian? in origin: phall curry? The "garam masala" makes the Indian food spicy as per my amateur Indian cuisine cooking experience, the chillies just provide the "hot" taste.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garam_masala

Is Indian spicy food a product of centuries long melting pot event in a playground called the Indian Sub continent?

Even the Garam Masala is not a set blend of spices, the reciepe vary from household to household.

wgjkkwjkf
11-05-2017, 11:12 PM
Corn is what I have hard time believing actually, because corn has been present in the sub continent for long time.

http://www.econ.ohio-state.edu/jhm/arch/maize.html

Perhaps a genetic test on the corn in India could confirm if any of the varieties of this plant are indigenous to India or if it is all descended from the American origin corn?

jdean
11-06-2017, 12:04 AM
Corn is what I have hard time believing actually, because corn has been present in the sub continent for long time.

There are references to corn in British documents before the 16th C. but in English it was a generic term for a cereal crop so these weren't to do with maze, possibly the same thing applies to the Indian subcontinent ?

MonkeyDLuffy
11-06-2017, 12:10 AM
There are references to corn in British documents before the 16th C. but in English it was a generic term for a cereal crop so these weren't to do with maze, possibly the same thing applies to the Indian subcontinent ?

its not just the name, there are sculptures of it in caves in India. Check out the link I posted.

parasar
11-06-2017, 12:57 AM
Corn is what I have hard time believing actually, because corn has been present in the sub continent for long time.

http://www.econ.ohio-state.edu/jhm/arch/maize.html

Yes I have seen those photos. And have speculated on some Mayan connection to the Subcontinent. But it has not turned up as yet in pre Columbian remains. Also the precursor from which it was selectively bred is a central American grass.
https://www.greatenergychallengeblog.com/news/files/2009/03/maize-and-wild-ancestor-comparison.jpg
https://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2009/03/23/corn_domesticated_8700_years_ago/

"The Difference Between Teosinte and Maize is About 5 Genes"
"More maize is harvested each year than any other grain."
http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/selection/corn/
http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/selection/corn/images/CornProgression.jpg
http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/selection/corn/images/MaizeTeosinteCross.jpg

parasar
11-06-2017, 01:06 AM
... And have speculated on some Mayan connection to the Subcontinent ...
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v96/n2407/abs/096425a0.html#top
https://uncoveredhistory.com/images/W1121BE-Copan-Stela-B-Elephants.jpg
https://uncoveredhistory.com/honduras/copan/the-elephants-of-copan/

BMG
11-06-2017, 02:30 AM
I don't know much about the history of Indian cuisine, haven't overall spicy Indian cuisine been evolving since the British era and perhaps before that?
I know that the spiciest chili pepper is the Naga viper and the spiciest curry dish is Bengali? British Indian? in origin: phall curry? The "garam masala" makes the Indian food spicy as per my amateur Indian cuisine cooking experience, the chillies just provide the "hot" taste.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garam_masala

Is Indian spicy food a product of centuries long melting pot event in a playground called the Indian Sub continent?
Indian food has certainly evolved by adding the new ingredients . So has the spicy food . We have also added many new dishes to our menu from Arabians, European,Central Asians and European and many of them have been adapted to our taste . In Kerala we have a dish chicken stew which is learned from British but we have made few changes ,instead of cow's milk we use coconut milk and of course we add cardomom and nutmeg powder .
We can also see Indian Chinese dishes which has adapted so much that it hardly resembles original Chinese dishes .
As for garam masala it varies from place to place ,house to house and even varies with each preparation . In my house we use mostly cardomom,cloves,cinnamon,nutmeg and black pepper and don't use cumin seeds and coriander seeds . Some people.modify it by including new other ingredients too to their liking . Surely this mix have been the base of the spicy Indian dishes and it's variations often gave the trademark flavours

BMG
11-06-2017, 02:39 AM
its not just the name, there are sculptures of it in caves in India. Check out the link I posted.
Couldn't those sculptures be of native millet crops like Bajra ?

Lara101
11-06-2017, 02:41 AM
Indian food has certainly evolved by adding the new ingredients . So has the spicy food . We have also added many new dishes to our menu from Arabians, European,Central Asians and European and many of them have been adapted to our taste . In Kerala we have a dish chicken stew which is learned from British but we have made few changes ,instead of cow's milk we use coconut milk and of course we add cardomom and nutmeg powder .
We can also see Indian Chinese dishes which has adapted so much that it hardly resembles original Chinese dishes .
As for garam masala it varies from place to place ,house to house and even varies with each preparation . In my house we use mostly cardomom,cloves,cinnamon,nutmeg and black pepper and don't use cumin seeds and coriander seeds . Some people.modify it by including new other ingredients too to their liking . Surely this mix have been the base of the spicy Indian dishes and it's variations often gave the trademark flavours

Kerala is the best cuisine in India Imo, yet not a lot people know about it

BMG
11-06-2017, 02:52 AM
Kerala is the best cuisine in India Imo, yet not a lot people know about it
It's subjective . It depends on personal preference and tastes .Not everybody may find it good.

Lara101
11-06-2017, 03:04 AM
It's subjective . It depends on personal preference and tastes .Not everybody may find it good.

Anybody who loves strong indian flavors will love it. Of course it might be spicy for most people, so not sure if non indians will like it.

BMG
11-06-2017, 03:46 AM
Anybody who loves strong indian flavors will love it. Of course it might be spicy for most people, so not sure if non indians will like it.
All the Kerala foods are not spciy . There are lot of non spicy dishes also . Actually we dont use much spices in our daily menu . especially in vegetarian food

pegasus
11-06-2017, 05:21 AM
I have noticed that too. Punjabis use so much Chillies, oils and spices that I simply cant bear. Pashtoons do use but atleast u can eat their food. I have travelled a few times to Rawalpindi, Gujrat and Faisalabad. I had to eat biscuits as the food in the hotels were too spicy for me. I don't know how you people digest it.

I didn't find it spicy , I found it more garlicy and/or creamier. The authentic Punjabi food is the one typically served at Gurduwaras run by the "Bappas' which my Sikh friend took me to ( well the veg dishes that is) . Its a very dairy leaning diet with a lot of ghee and yoghurt and a lot of lentils/daals.

I think if you eat at restaurants the food will be far more greasy, home food is always different. The cuisine largely served at Indo/Pak restaurants in the West is largely of Punjabi origin mixed in with Mughal cuisine. It has proven quite successful in particular in the UK.

poi
11-06-2017, 06:03 AM
It is interesting that the Nepali hill brahmins considered consuming garlic, onion, mushrooms, and chicken a serious dietary transgression (you could lose caste), similar to consuming alcohol. Although not as serious offense, but consuming tomatoes was also virtually prohibited. Obviously, this practice has disappeared in the city, but in rural areas (when I used to visit many family members), the homemade food was just so freakin bland.

kush
11-06-2017, 06:13 AM
It is interesting that the Nepali hill brahmins considered consuming garlic, onion, mushrooms, and chicken a serious dietary transgression (you could lose caste), similar to consuming alcohol. Although not as serious offense, but consuming tomatoes was also virtually prohibited. Obviously, this practice has disappeared in the city, but in rural areas (when I used to visit many family members), the homemade food was just so freakin bland.

Yes i heard this among indian brahmins as well. Garlic, onions, and mushrooms are supposed to promote sexual desires and what not so brahmins used to avoid them. I havent heard much about tomatoes though but they probably avoided that as well..

pegasus
11-06-2017, 07:11 AM
Is there a linkage between the two? Most Indians prefer spicy food, and South Indians in general eat the most spice. My mom at home makes Uttar Pradeshi dishes and her food is also pretty spicy! Mainly Uttar Pradesh and southwards, people eat the most spice. NW indians like Punjabies, Sindhis, Gujaraties etc..eat less spice, compared to their eastern and southern neighbours

If you are talking about green chillis /red chilli peppers it cannot be genetic because those were introduced to the Old World by Europeans 300-400 years ago. Green Chilis/Chilli Peppers are from Meso America.

pegasus
11-06-2017, 07:15 AM
Kerala is the best cuisine in India Imo, yet not a lot people know about it

I tried it and it has too much coconut and kari leaf. The most palatable Indian cuisine to outside world, in particular the West, would still be Punjabi and Mughal influenced cuisines.

Lara101
11-06-2017, 02:24 PM
I tried it and it has too much coconut and kari leaf. The most palatable Indian cuisine to outside world, in particular the West, would still be Punjabi and Mughal influenced cuisines.

Kerala and south indian food in general is more exotic and tropical

parasar
11-06-2017, 06:14 PM
It is interesting that the Nepali hill brahmins considered consuming garlic, onion, mushrooms, and chicken a serious dietary transgression (you could lose caste), similar to consuming alcohol. Although not as serious offense, but consuming tomatoes was also virtually prohibited. Obviously, this practice has disappeared in the city, but in rural areas (when I used to visit many family members), the homemade food was just so freakin bland.

In our family (past generations, thankfully!) onion and garlic were forbidden from consumption.

Cf: Reportedly the prophet Muhammad did not eat garlic or onions because he was in contact with godly entities.

Also: "Garlic and onions, as well as beef, were prohibited" per laws of the Mughal Emperor Akbar https://books.google.com/books?id=y_BBAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA220

Old Indic texts recommend garlic so its disfavor must have been a later, perhaps Buddha period development.

"Prohibited foods should not be eaten ... onions, leeks, scallions, garlic, chives"
Rules of Purity for the Chan Monastery
https://terebess.hu/zen/Chanyuan-qinggui.pdf

poi
11-06-2017, 06:48 PM
In our family (past generations, thankfully!) onion and garlic were forbidden from consumption.

Cf: Reportedly the prophet Muhammad did not eat garlic or onions because he was in contact with godly entities.

Also: "Garlic and onions, as well as beef, were prohibited" per laws of the Mughal Emperor Akbar https://books.google.com/books?id=y_BBAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA220

Old Indic texts recommend garlic so its disfavor must have been a later, perhaps Buddha period development.

"Prohibited foods should not be eaten ... onions, leeks, scallions, garlic, chives"
Rules of Purity for the Chan Monastery
https://terebess.hu/zen/Chanyuan-qinggui.pdf

Garlic and onion do add flavor (when they are fresh), but man they STINK after they become a bit stale. And the whole house smells after you cook onion or garlic. But I don't buy the stink argument because cow patties were everywhere, lol

parasar
11-27-2017, 07:10 PM
Yep potato, tomato, chilies, tapioca, corn, squash, etc. are all American.

https://www.academia.edu/3760984/Looking_at_Indian_food_and_cusine_in_the_past-_a_historicl_analysis
"Around 7000 BCE, sesame, eggplant and humped cattle had been domesticated in the Indus Valley. By 3000 BCE, turmeric,cardamom, black pepper and mustard were harvested in India."

Would also add that kidney beans - rajma - is also from Mexico. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajma