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Wing Genealogist
11-11-2017, 06:15 PM
Am I wrong in assuming the vast majority (if not all) H-G cultures are nomadic by nature? I would think they would basically have to follow the migration paths of the animals they hunt in order to survive. In addition, the plant life H-G cultures relied on also would most likely be seasonal, and there is a need to move with the seasons to seek out both flora and fauna were essential to survival.

The migration paths of many animals often cover vast territories of hundreds of miles. Thus, pinpointing a specific origin of the various early haplogroups really can never be too specific, as the culture wasn't tied to the land, but rather to their food sources.

Saetro
11-11-2017, 08:11 PM
I would think they would basically have to follow the migration paths of the animals they hunt in order to survive.

That is only one mode.
Many wait for the migrating animals to come to them.
Some flourished near natural features that funnelled migrating animals into a narrow area while they migrated, but used other nearby sources for the rest of the year.
So it is possible to live in a relatively small range and follow the seasonality of foods.
There will have to be some movement, because some plants are in one area and some in another and animals likewise.

People also forget that many hunter-gatherers often have about a month or so per year when there is very little food available and they almost starve.
The food supply is not entirely continuous in temperate climates.
In cold places, this would probably be part of winter.

We also tend to think of hunter-gatherers as purely harvesting.
Unless they are herd-followers, when they might tend to protect the flock.
Hunter-gatherers might harvest a plant but plant some of the seeds to ensure there would be more there next year.
And closer involvement is possible with richer environments and brings about greater, more intimate knowledge of resources.
Those that fish in internal waterways might build fish traps that last more than one year.
This investment in a range tends to make one want to protect it against exploitation from others, and so stay close by, or at the very least, ensure it is visited more frequently.

Saetro
11-11-2017, 08:13 PM
I would think they would basically have to follow the migration paths of the animals they hunt in order to survive.

That is only one mode.
Many wait for the migrating animals to come to them.
Some flourished near natural features that funnelled migrating animals into a narrow area while they migrated, but used other nearby sources for the rest of the year.
So it is possible to live in a relatively small range and follow the seasonality of foods.
There will have to be some movement, because some plants are in one area and some in another and animals likewise.

People also forget that many hunter-gatherers often have about a month or so per year when there is very little food available and they almost starve.
The food supply is not entirely continuous in temperate climates.
In cold places, this would probably be part of winter.

We also tend to think of hunter-gatherers as purely harvesting.
Unless they are herd-followers, when they might tend to protect the flock.
Hunter-gatherers might harvest a plant but plant some of the seeds to ensure there would be more there next year.
And closer involvement is possible with richer environments and brings about greater, more intimate knowledge of resources.
Those that fish in internal waterways might build fish traps that last more than one year.
This investment in a range tends to make one want to protect it against exploitation from others, and so stay close by, or at the very least, ensure it is visited more frequently.

So some are more nomadic than others.

Psynome
11-11-2017, 08:14 PM
There is archaeological and historical evidence of forager societies that were predominantly sedentary.

This usually occurred during the Mesolithic and later in areas that were particularly rich in natural food resources, enough so that people were able to obtain food without following animal herds or leaving an area when it became depleted.

Often, aquatic food was the basis of these societies. Cultures like the Jōmon of Japan and the Native American societies of the Pacific Northwest Coast exploited fish and other aquatic food to the extent that they developed sedentary societies and relatively high population densities without farming.

A Norfolk L-M20
11-11-2017, 08:21 PM
My understanding is one of adaptation. Different environments and resources, different economic strategies. I understand for example that some communities close to fish-rich (and beach combing) seas and lakes can pretty much settle. Other's for example here in NW Europe, may have at times had seasonal patterns. For example, forming large social groupings by a lake or sea for a part of the year when food there is available, then breaking up into smaller groups, and moving inland in hunting parties at other times of the year.