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surbakhunWeesste
11-11-2017, 06:52 PM
This is very sad.

They have to be one of the most beautiful souls I have come across


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdvlO6bPG60

Koshur_Sam
11-11-2017, 06:55 PM
This is very sad.

They have to be one of the most beautiful souls I have come across


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdvlO6bPG60

I love reading about these guys, something very fascinating about them, they have been treated like shit by the British during colonisation and now the Indian govt is doing the same.
We need to sit down with them and see what we can learn about our history, am i right in assuming these guys are the source of the south east eurasian group that comes up on some calculators?
Could we say they're also just one of the oldest ancestors of the Indian subcontinent?

Awale
11-11-2017, 07:04 PM
We need to sit down with them and see what we can learn about our history, am i right in assuming these guys are the source of the south east eurasian group that comes up on some calculators? Could we say they're also just one of the oldest ancestors of the Indian subcontinent?

Well, more like people on the subcontinent related to them who make up a lot of the ancestry in groups like some Paniyas (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paniya_people). Now this is more phenotype based, but I don't think the "Southeast Eurasian" group or "ASI" or whatever one wishes to call the pre-Neolithic inhabitants of the subcontinent had their afro-textured hair (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-textured_hair) either. Probably more straight and wavy-haired like Paniyas, otherwise South-Asians' hair today would appear a lot like that of West-Asian admixed Horners like Somalis and Habeshas (+ Sudani Arabs and Nubians).


This is very sad.

Indeed. Inevitable given the conditions surrounding them but sad indeed.

Kurd
11-11-2017, 07:19 PM
I love reading about these guys, something very fascinating about them, they have been treated like shit by the British during colonisation and now the Indian govt is doing the same.
We need to sit down with them and see what we can learn about our history, am i right in assuming these guys are the source of the south east eurasian group that comes up on some calculators?
Could we say they're also just one of the oldest ancestors of the Indian subcontinent?

Indeed sad that there are only a 100 or 200 left.

My analysis (supporting documentation to be posted in an article on my website) indicates a couple of things:

1- their closest relatives are tribals in NE India such as Santhal and Ho, along with Brunei tribals
2- they are more drifted than their mainland relatives due to small initial pop size ie both fixation AND loss of alleles is accelerated due to their small numbers
3- They are less admixed than their mainland relatives, although their accelerated drift masks their actual relatedness to S Asians

4- They crossed the ocean towards the end of LGM around 10000 years ago. Hetrozygosity does not support sepearation 40000 years ago as suggested by some (details in article). At that time only about 30 miles separated the Andamans from Burma

5- Moving forward I will likely not use them as ASI proxies, rather I will use their less drifted relatives

MonkeyDLuffy
11-11-2017, 09:00 PM
Also some of them are being forcefully converted to Christianity so they’re losing their rituals and languages

TJRocks760
11-15-2017, 06:42 PM
Indeed sad that there are only a 100 or 200 left.

My analysis (supporting documentation to be posted in an article on my website) indicates a couple of things:

1- their closest relatives are tribals in NE India such as Santhal and Ho, along with Brunei tribals
2- they are more drifted than their mainland relatives due to small initial pop size ie both fixation AND loss of alleles is accelerated due to their small numbers
3- They are less admixed than their mainland relatives, although their accelerated drift masks their actual relatedness to S Asians

4- They crossed the ocean towards the end of LGM around 10000 years ago. Hetrozygosity does not support sepearation 40000 years ago as suggested by some (details in article). At that time only about 30 miles separated the Andamans from Burma

5- Moving forward I will likely not use them as ASI proxies, rather I will use their less drifted relatives

Hi Kurd,

Since the mainland people you mentioned are the closest relatives to the Jarawa how does rest of Indian subcontinent come into play in terms of genetic mixture? For instance, Sam mentioned, "We need to sit down with them and see what we can learn about our history..." In ancient historical context what can these people say about my past if I'm not Santhal or Brunei?

poi
11-29-2017, 10:29 PM
Here is a video of the last remaining Kusunda speaker... Kusunda is another vanishing tribe... this time in Nepal. Not sure if this has been posted before.

Unfortunately, the woman does not speak Kusunda in this video, but speaks Nepali and her son speaks Hindi. Only starting the 5:30 mark, her little granddaughter starts translating (Nepali) words to Kusunda for the camera.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FPvYK1RtuI

Kristiina
11-30-2017, 08:27 AM
Abuse is completely wrong, and from the scientific point of view, it is sad to lose isolates, but to keep these people "locked away in prehistory" is also problematic.

I think that, in the end, it might be better if they just were quietly assimilated into the mainstream culture, because nobody wants to be a relict that all others stare with amazement.

redifflal
06-07-2018, 04:15 AM
So prior to Brits it seems Marathas also used the islands as naval base. Are they really as isolated as is being claimed?

coolguy
07-04-2018, 04:56 PM
If the natives of the Andaman Islands die out, then South Asia will lose it's only non-admixed population.

poi
07-04-2018, 09:53 PM
If the natives of the Andaman Islands die out, then South Asia will lose it's only non-admixed population.

I understand that the Andaman Islanders are unadmixed descendants of the "first" modern human settlers in Asia, but -- geographically -- they would be in Southeast Asia rather than South Asia. Unadmixed South Asia AASI died out thousands of years ago with the incursion of Iran_N and then various Steppe peoples.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1f/Andaman_Islands.PNG

bmoney
07-06-2018, 12:26 AM
yep, they came to Andamans via a Burma land bridge, not via India, and are significantly diverged