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DillonResearcher
11-12-2017, 10:01 PM
I was doing some research into R-L135 (R-L2>BY3508>L135) again this evening and noticed that a new sample on the Genographic Project database is (based on the FTDNA U152 maps) the fifth most northern L2 or U152 sample with the testers MDKA being in northern Norway. Since the Genographic database is not public I am being deliberately vague I'm afraid!

I think that the 'I1' haplogroup is the predominant haplogroup in Scandinavia but it would be interesting to know any theories as to why L2 did not spread much into this area compared to say the British Isles.

MitchellSince1893
11-12-2017, 10:13 PM
I was doing some research into R-L135 (R-L2>BY3508>L135) ...it would be interesting to know any theories as to why L2 did not spread much into this area compared to say the British Isles.
It's just too damn cold up there. This L2 guy prefers milder climates. Having lived in Alaska, Canada, and Nebraska I vowed to never again live in a place that required a snow shovel :)

Sorry that's all I got at the moment, but if you are looking for "Deep thoughts" http://runt-of-the-web.com/jack-handey-quotes

evon
11-13-2017, 03:26 PM
I was doing some research into R-L135 (R-L2>BY3508>L135) again this evening and noticed that a new sample on the Genographic Project database is (based on the FTDNA U152 maps) the fifth most northern L2 or U152 sample with the testers MDKA being in northern Norway. Since the Genographic database is not public I am being deliberately vague I'm afraid!

I think that the 'I1' haplogroup is the predominant haplogroup in Scandinavia but it would be interesting to know any theories as to why L2 did not spread much into this area compared to say the British Isles.

Northern Norway was settled by allot of Scots and Germans during the 13-1700's.. So it may very well be via one of these settlers.. This guy is a prime example of such migrations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petter_Dass

My uncle is U152 by the way... But he traces his linage to a mountain village in western Norway..

DillonResearcher
11-13-2017, 11:47 PM
Northern Norway was settled by allot of Scots and Germans during the 13-1700's.. So it may very well be via one of these settlers.. This guy is a prime example of such migrations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petter_Dass

My uncle is U152 by the way... But he traces his linage to a mountain village in western Norway..

That's interesting, in particular I never knew about Scotland to Scandinavia migration.

evon
11-14-2017, 10:09 AM
That's interesting, in particular I never knew about Scotland to Scandinavia migration.

It was so influential that we even named one era of our history as the Scottish era:
http://nordlands-stream.com/html/NT1630.html

Some villages in western Norway were even named as "Scottish village" because of the high number of Scottish immigrants there. I have a few British ancestors who immigrated to Norway around that period, Maxwell/Lawson, Gray, Nither, etc...

MitchellSince1893
11-14-2017, 01:41 PM
I believe I have ancestors who made the reverse immigration...Norway to eastern Scotland. My Mitchell line is from Montrose, Scotland on the North Sea Coast, and I sometimes have these unknown Norwegian matches on some of these paternal segments.

theImmortal
11-14-2017, 04:08 PM
I believe I have ancestors who made the reverse immigration...Norway to eastern Scotland. My Mitchell line is from Montrose, Scotland on the North Sea Coast, and I sometimes have these unknown Norwegian matches on some of these paternal segments.

Saw you got your Big Y results back. Anything interesting to report?

MitchellSince1893
11-14-2017, 04:55 PM
Saw you got your Big Y results back. Anything interesting to report?

I got my original BigY results back in March 2014. The hg38 update isn't yet complete as I only have 1 match showing up at the moment who is on my current terminal branch FGC12384. I've known about him before the update. I'm not seeing any matches at levels higher than this yet. e.g. I should eventually see some Z142 matches when this update is complete.

evon
11-14-2017, 09:54 PM
I believe I have ancestors who made the reverse immigration...Norway to eastern Scotland. My Mitchell line is from Montrose, Scotland on the North Sea Coast, and I sometimes have these unknown Norwegian matches on some of these paternal segments.

How did you determine which way the migration went?

MitchellSince1893
11-14-2017, 10:01 PM
How did you determine which way the migration went?

I have Norwegian matches on my father's paternal grandfather's segments...on the same segments as known Scottish ancestor lines

i.e. my father has a 3rd cousin on his Scottish Mitchell side, and my father, his cousin and these Norwegian matches are all on the same chr segment. So I'm making the assumption it's Norwegians that came to Scotland and either they or their descendants eventually married into my Mitchell line.

evon
11-15-2017, 01:37 PM
I have Norwegian matches on my father's paternal grandfather's segments...on the same segments as known Scottish ancestor lines

i.e. my father has a 3rd cousin on his Scottish Mitchell side, and my father, his cousin and these Norwegian matches are all on the same chr segment. So I'm making the assumption it's Norwegians that came to Scotland and either they or their descendants eventually married into my Mitchell line.

Could just as well be the other way around. Where a Scottish man, whom you share a common Y-line ancestor with, migrated to Norway and now has several descendants there (the Y-line could actually be from anywhere in Europe, and you and your Norwegians matches share a common ancestor who lived in a third country like Germany etc).. I dont know how common U152 is in Scotland though?

MitchellSince1893
11-15-2017, 02:00 PM
Could just as well be the other way around. Where a Scottish man, whom you share a common Y-line ancestor with, migrated to Norway and now has several descendants there (the Y-line could actually be from anywhere in Europe, and you and your Norwegians matches share a common ancestor who lived in a third country like Germany etc).. I dont know how common U152 is in Scotland though?


Sorry I wasn't clear. These aren't Y dna matches. My Mitchell line isn't my paternal line prior to 1893 (hence my username). These are my father's paternal grandfather's mother's segment matches.

But yes you have a valid point. I hadn't considered that possibility.

A.Morup
11-15-2017, 08:05 PM
Hi there!

We are a group of 3 Scandinavians under L2 > Z367 > Z35 > BY3604 (see here at Yfull (https://yfull.com/tree/R-Z35/)).
Currently it seems like BY3604 might well be an isolated 100% Scandinavian branch.

Through an extremely lucky Y37-match, kit YF08552 has proven that his paperline is correct back to a man born ~1580 in Blekinge, Southern Sweden.

Thanks to Sanger sequencing of the Y37-match (no BigY), we know that my branch (kit YF07058) branched out before the 1580-man.

Sadly, YF08552 has only one novel combBED SNP after the 1580-man.
Same with me - only one novel combBED SNP compared to kit YF08552.
My ancestry is from Sjaelland, Denmark, 1678.

Kit YF09312 also has South Swedish ancestry, but the link is two combBED SNPs before the 1580-man, so no chance to document that.

The two 1000 Genomes kits under BY3604 are most probably of Scandinavian descent too.

We are very eagerly trying to trace other BY3604's from Scandinavia - please contact us on anders.morup at my Gmail account if you happen to be one :)

Best regards
Anders

kinman
11-16-2017, 11:57 PM
I only have two matches so far (both surname Langley), my two closest relatives who have taken the Big Y. I wonder how long it will be before you show up as a match to me (and vice versa).


I got my original BigY results back in March 2014. The hg38 update isn't yet complete as I only have 1 match showing up at the moment who is on my current terminal branch FGC12384. I've known about him before the update. I'm not seeing any matches at levels higher than this yet. e.g. I should eventually see some Z142 matches when this update is complete.

MitchellSince1893
11-17-2017, 12:11 AM
I only have two matches so far (both surname Langley), my two closest relatives who have taken the Big Y. I wonder how long it will be before you show up as a match to me (and vice versa).
Unless FTDNA changes their algorithm we won't show up as matches to each other. I'm guessing the cut off is no earlier than ~ 500 AD give or a few centuries ...not based on a date but on # variants not shared which appears to go back to around 500 AD in a few cases.
http://www.anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?12230-Big-Y-changes&p=311003&viewfull=1#post311003