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DillonResearcher
12-09-2017, 01:57 PM
I have made another U152 distribution map which might be of interest, I have combined the data from the U152 and Genographic Project for U152+ with Irish paternal ancestry. Having removed duplicates, those with the same surname in the same area this left 40 suitable testers who has specified the location of their MDKA to at least county level.

20338

Interestingly alongside the big concentration in Cork the centre of Ireland seems very much devoid of U152. Later on I might do some breakdown of the subclades involved.

Sikeliot
12-09-2017, 06:11 PM
Who does this subclade peak in, and what is it supposed to represent?

theImmortal
12-09-2017, 06:48 PM
Later on I might do some breakdown of the subclades involved.

In the meantime, can you tell how much diversity there is among the subclades in Cork?

Very interested in this. I'm an Irish L2, but still working on the county of origin.

Celt_??
12-09-2017, 06:54 PM
Who does this subclade peak in, and what is it supposed to represent?

I am also wondering with which "migration" this might have been associated. Jean Manco in her revised 2016 edition of Ancestral Journeys wrote that U152 in England might have been associated with an Iron Age Celt migration.

DillonResearcher
12-09-2017, 07:19 PM
I am also wondering with which "migration" this might have been associated. Jean Manco in her revised 2016 edition of Ancestral Journeys wrote that U152 in England might have been associated with an Iron Age Celt migration.

I very much doubt that we could attribute U152 to a single migration and although people in the past (and myself) seem to have considered much of the Irish U152 to be from Norman influence I'm not so sure that this is the case. I would be very interested to know if Co. Cork is viewed as having had different migrations to the rest of Ireland that could explain the large concentration there.

Pascal C
12-09-2017, 08:17 PM
Cork didn't have much LaTene influence:
https://www.celticcultureblog.tk/art/images/989_63_80-tene-chronology.jpg

It did have Norman and there was later English influx in Tudor times.

Surnames may help clear the picture

DillonResearcher
12-09-2017, 09:28 PM
Cork didn't have much LaTene influence:
https://www.celticcultureblog.tk/art/images/989_63_80-tene-chronology.jpg

It did have Norman and there was later English influx in Tudor times.

Surnames may help clear the picture

Thank you for that map the big lack of La Tene archeology in the south of Ireland on the map makes makes think that U152 in Cork cannot be attributed to La Tene at all really so that may have largely ruled one option out.

Pascal C
12-09-2017, 09:40 PM
I should mention there was some Scandinavian presence also but not really large. In fact I think it was wiped out for a while by the locals but was resettled in the 10th century.

I really think the surnames might help give a better picture.

anglesqueville
12-09-2017, 09:45 PM
I very much doubt that we could attribute U152 to a single migration and although people in the past (and myself) seem to have considered much of the Irish U152 to be from Norman influence I'm not so sure that this is the case. I would be very interested to know if Co. Cork is viewed as having had different migrations to the rest of Ireland that could explain the large concentration there.

100% agree. So far the 7 oldest U152 have been found in "german" Bell Beakers, and furthermore if we trust in the C14 datations, Rise563 is not only the oldest U152, he is also the oldest P312 ( Richard Rocca has written somewhere a post about Rise563, but I was unable to find it again). There is no serious reason to associate U152 in Ireland with the norman invasion, and furthermore there is no sound reason to keep calling U152 "italo-celtic" (one of the many bullshits that people have produced on the basis of stupid statistics on modern distributions). My guess: if you want to find U152, search the Beakers.

DillonResearcher
12-09-2017, 09:50 PM
I have no surnames for the Genographic Project data (which is a huge downside of that dataset) but the U152 project surnames are as follows:

Platt
Dillon (me)
Boals
Butler
Grady
Lyttle
Maher
McCarroll/Carroll
Ballard
Dalton (similar surname to me but different subclade of L2 before anyone asks!)
Baird
McAvity
Jones
Fox
Kennedy
Collins
McCarthy
Barry (seems to be Norman from Flanders)
Johnston
Winters
Landers
O'Nolan
Wilson
Shannon
Long
MacKay
Allan
Straghan
McCracken
Black
Donachy
Erskine
McGill


By the way, these surnames are publically available on the FTDNA project website so I don't think I am breaching any privacy rules by listing these.

Pascal C
12-09-2017, 10:39 PM
Certainly a mix of apparently non native (English, Old English aka Norman, and Scottish) and native names, mostly non native, though some may be anglicizations. Are these only Cork?

Pylsteen
12-09-2017, 10:49 PM
The O'Nolan Z145+ is interesting because their DYS385 is 11-17, which seems a characteristic of the Italian-heavy Z72 subclade. They have not tested that snp though.

DillonResearcher
12-09-2017, 10:50 PM
Certainly a mix of apparently non native (English, Old English aka Norman, and Scottish) and native names, mostly non native, though some may be anglicizations. Are these only Cork?

These are all the Irish testers in the U152 Project

MitchellSince1893
12-10-2017, 05:19 AM
I have no surnames for the Genographic Project data (which is a huge downside of that dataset) but the U152 project surnames are as follows:

Platt
Dillon (me)
Boals
Butler
Grady
Lyttle
Maher
McCarroll/Carroll
Ballard
Dalton (similar surname to me but different subclade of L2 before anyone asks!)
Baird
McAvity
Jones
Fox
Kennedy
Collins
McCarthy
Barry (seems to be Norman from Flanders)
Johnston
Winters
Landers
O'Nolan
Wilson
Shannon
Long
MacKay
Allan
Straghan
McCracken
Black
Donachy
Erskine
McGill


By the way, these surnames are publically available on the FTDNA project website so I don't think I am breaching any privacy rules by listing these.

These are found in Robert Casey's spreadsheet with "Ireland" or "Northern Ireland" in the country column. Many of them you already have. http://www.rcasey.net/DNA/Temp/HG_R_...20170630A.xlsx

Ireland has a higher percentage of L2 compared to the U152 project as a whole. ~87% Ireland vs 70% as a whole.

Allan R1b-U152>Z36 Northern Ireland
Baird R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Ballard R1b-U152 Ireland
Ballew R1b-U152 Ireland
Barry R1b-U152>L2>Z49>S8183>Y4356>BY5701 Ireland
Bell R1b-U152>L2>Z49 Ireland
Black R1b-U152>L2>L20 Northern Ireland
Boals R1b-U152>Z384>L20>CTS9733>BY3554 Ireland
Bowling R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
Carroll R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Collins R1b-U152>L2>DF103 Ireland
Connors R1b-U152 Ireland
Cooley R1b-U152 Ireland
Craig R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Crozier R1b-U152>Z193>CTS11874 Northern Ireland
Dalzell R1b-U152>L2 Northern Ireland
Donachy R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
Dwan R1b-U152 Ireland
England R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Ferguson R1b-U152>L2>Z367 Ireland
Fox R1b-U152>L2>Z367 Ireland
Grady R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Hannon R1b-U152 Ireland
Harvey R1b-U152 Northern Ireland
Hines R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Jackson R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Johns(t)on R1b-U152 Ireland
Keating R1b-U152 Ireland
Keenan R1b-U152>L2>Z384>[L144] Ireland
Kendall R1b-U152>L2>Z384>[L144] Ireland
Kennedy R1b-U152>Z193>CTS11874 Ireland
Landers R1b-U152 Ireland
Love R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
Lyttle R1b-U152>Z36 Ireland
MacLaughlin R1b-U152>L2>Z384>[L144] Ireland
Maher R1b-U152 Ireland
McCarthy R1b-U152 Ireland
McDonough R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
McGill R1b-U152 Northern Ireland
McGoran R1b-U152>L2>ZZ48_1>FGC10516 Ireland
McShea R1b-U152>L2>Z384>[L144] Ireland
Monaghan R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
O'Hair R1b-U152>L2 Northern Ireland
O'Nolan R1b-U152>PF660>PF6578/Z146 Ireland
Phelan R1b-U152>L2>Z384>[L144] Ireland
Ray R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Robbin R1b-U152 Ireland
Score R1b-U152 Ireland
Shannon R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Straghan R1b-U152>L2>L20 Northern Ireland
Taylor R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
Tully R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Tweedy R1b-U152 Northern Ireland
Vance R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
White R1b-U152 Ireland
Willis R1b-U152 Ireland
Wilson R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
Winter/Winters R1b-U152>L2>L20 Ireland
Withrow R1b-U152>L2 Northern Ireland
Wright R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152>L2 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152 Ireland
zUnkName R1b-U152 Ireland


Also you might want to look through this project'Irish counties https://www.familytreedna.com/public/BritishIsles?iframe=yresults

theImmortal
12-10-2017, 05:21 PM
After thinking on it for a while, I suspect it’s a sampling bias due to the fact that it's mostly American kits being tested. (And after checking with the familial authorities, my L2 Irish line is claimed to have come from Cork as well, but that's all we have).

It seems like there are 4 potential causes:

(1) Iron Age migration (2,000BC - 500 BC);
(2) Roman influence (200BC - 200AD);
(3) U152 Normans (1171AD-1350AD); and
(4) English plantation (1550 AD - 1650AD)

Among these, I would say it's either Roman influence or U152 Normans. Recall that the Romans did try and fail to establish an Irish outpost (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drumanagh) near Dublin. The military power center was on the east side of the island, between Dublin and Ulster. Roman legions may have done more trading and incidental settlement in the southwest part of the country or even established outposts that were later destroyed or that just haven't been excavated yet. After all, Drumanagh was only "discovered" as a Roman outpost in the 1950s.

If it were Iron Age migrations, there would be U152 kits peppered throughout the country without regard to political and social events in the modern era. We'd see U152 kits from Ulster, but we apparently do not. And English plantation was significant in the Northern part of the country as well. Though it's possible that, purely as a logistical matter, the English planters that went there were from Northern England and those who went to Southern Ireland came from Southern England (where U152 is concentrated).

The phenomenon of Irish U152 kits being overwhelmingly from Cork can probably be explained by the following facts:

1. Cork is a populous county.

2. The potato famine hit Cork harder than Ulster or Dublin, the other two densely populated parts of Ireland.

3. The Normans did really well in and around Dublin, so U152 descendants of theirs would have become the urban elites and wouldn't have migrated to the United States. If genetic genealogy takes off in Ireland, I bet we’ll find some U152 kits there.

4. Meanwhile, the Normans did terribly in Ulster, so you wouldn’t expect any Ulster immigrants to be U152 in the first place.

5. Those in the Dublin area who did leave were probably more likely to go to Britain or continental Europe, not the United States. Again, as a logistical matter, Cork is the best jumping off point from which to travel to the United States, unless I'm missing something about the lack of ports in Cork County.

Ergo, among the U152 Irish that came to America during the famine, we should expect them to have come from Cork, just as a matter of population trends. And because it's mostly Americans who are submitting kits, the U152 kits we have are from Cork.

A couple of maps below to support this explanation. The NW/Connacht region was also hit hard, but this is the least densely populated part of Ireland. It’s also the part of the country that was least accessible to either the Normans or the Romans, and I doubt there are a lot of native Irish submitting kits from that region.

My knowledge of Irish history is sprinkled, chronologically speaking, so if there are any proximate causes I am not considering, I'm all ears.

20357 20358

MitchellSince1893
12-11-2017, 05:58 AM
This has been brought up before...


Manapii of the Belgae

Ptolemy reported that the Manapii were located in the east of Ireland, approximately in what is now Co. Wicklow. Although we don't have absolute proof, these have long been recognized by a number of scholars as a branch of the Menapii, a tribe of the Belgae of northern Gaul located about the mouth of the Rhine who fiercely resisted Caesar until 54 B.C. The Menapii also produced Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius, a prominent military commander of the Roman Empire who declared himself Emperor in 286 A.D. As would be expected as they switched from speaking Gaulish P-Celtic to Irish Q-Celtic, they are known in Ireland in the early historic period as the Manaig, with Monaig and Monach being variations in spelling.

Over time, the Manapii or Manaig of Ireland trekked north from Leinster (in which Cúigiú or 'Fifth' of Ireland we find Co. Wicklow), leaving their name on Druim Monach ('Drumanagh') and on a ford called Scenmenn Monach in the north of Co. Dublin. They eventually became the Monaig/Manaig in Uí Echach Ulad (west Co. Down) and also in the neighborhood of Loch Éirne ('Lough Erne') in what is now Co. Fermanagh. Later they became known as the Fir Manach. Co. Fermanagh is named after them.

In Irish seanchas, the Manappi or Manaig are classified as a branch of the Fir Bolg, just as the Menapii were a branch of the Belgae on the Continent. In my opinion, this traditional classification, this traditional association of Manappi and Bolg, defies mere coincidence. In other words, I believe that this classification positively identifies the Manaig of Ireland as Menapii, and the Fir Bolg or Bolg of Ireland as Belgae. https://www.irishtribes.com/ailt-articles/descendants-of-the-celtic-tribes-of-ireland/

Who knows? Maybe there is some truth to it.

palamede
01-16-2018, 09:03 PM
The 2 Barry of Cork county (FTDNA project) are signalled Y11179/Y11178 and Y13610 sub-branch of Y11178

https://www.yfull.com/tree/R-Y11178/ gives 8 members : one Texan and seven Irishmen (4 Cork, 1Wexford, 1 Clare, 1 unknown county) 850

R-Y11178 formation 4400 tmrca 850 (about 1100 BP)

In Ytree , there are 14 members : 12 Barry, 1 Downey, 1 Bell.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_(name)
The surname Barry has numerous origins :

In some cases it is an Anglicised form of the Irish Ó Beargha, meaning "descendant of Beargh". The byname Beargh means "plunderer" or "spear-like". In other cases Barry is an Anglicisation of the Irish Ó Báire, meaning "descendant of Báire".[4] In other cases Barry is a patronymic form of the personal name Henry.[2] In such cases, the name is partly derived from the Welsh ap, as is the case of the similar surname Parry, which is in turn derived from the Welsh ap Harry.[11] In other cases, the surname Barry is derived from a place name, sometimes seemingly of Continental origin,[12] and sometimes derived from a British place name, such as Barry, Angus in Scotland.[13]

The surname Barry, when borne in Ireland, is chiefly derived from the name borne by the Anglo-Norman de Barry family.[14] In Irish, this family's name is rendered de Barra. In Ireland, the surname Barry is most common in Munster and south Leinster. The concentrations of the surname in County Limerick could correspond with the Ó Beargha origin of the name, whilst the concentration of the surname in West Cork could correspond with the Ó Báire origin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Barry_family
The seat of the family was in the Cork county.

There are also 6 Collins of Cork county in the subgroup of theFTDNA project U152> L2> DF103,FGC4183,FGC36277> FGC4166,FGC4220
15 members including 10 Collins (8 with Irish origin, 2 unknown origin), 3 other names with origin : Dublin-Ireland, USA(Allen) , Romania.

In Ytree, the same sub-branch is R-P312/S116 > Z40481 > ZZ11 > U152/S28 > L2/S139 > S14469 > S23682 > BY2381 for 1 Collins and 1 Allen .

Romilius
01-16-2018, 09:13 PM
The 2 Barry of Cork county (FTDNA project) are signalled Y11179/Y11178 and Y13610 sub-branch of Y11178

https://www.yfull.com/tree/R-Y11178/ gives 8 members : one Texan and seven Irishmen (4 Cork, 1Wexford, 1 Clare, 1 unknown county) 850

R-Y11178 formation 4400 tmrca 850 (about 1100 BP)

In Ytree , there are 14 members : 12 Barry, 1 Downey, 1 Bell.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_(name)
The surname Barry has numerous origins :

In some cases it is an Anglicised form of the Irish Ó Beargha, meaning "descendant of Beargh". The byname Beargh means "plunderer" or "spear-like". In other cases Barry is an Anglicisation of the Irish Ó Báire, meaning "descendant of Báire".[4] In other cases Barry is a patronymic form of the personal name Henry.[2] In such cases, the name is partly derived from the Welsh ap, as is the case of the similar surname Parry, which is in turn derived from the Welsh ap Harry.[11] In other cases, the surname Barry is derived from a place name, sometimes seemingly of Continental origin,[12] and sometimes derived from a British place name, such as Barry, Angus in Scotland.[13]

The surname Barry, when borne in Ireland, is chiefly derived from the name borne by the Anglo-Norman de Barry family.[14] In Irish, this family's name is rendered de Barra. In Ireland, the surname Barry is most common in Munster and south Leinster. The concentrations of the surname in County Limerick could correspond with the Ó Beargha origin of the name, whilst the concentration of the surname in West Cork could correspond with the Ó Báire origin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Barry_family
The seat of the family was in the Cork county.

There is also this project:
https://sites.google.com/site/barrymorednaproject/

jbarry6899
01-16-2018, 11:47 PM
You may also find this of interest: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B03V2QSKXLxZOFZxZTVQZXhuc28/view?usp=sharing

lamahorse
01-21-2018, 12:17 AM
Irish U152 here too but I'm some distant cousin of L2. I'm the McCarthy above. We have a single Butler match and a few Noonan and Newmans.

Not sure what our history might be but I imagine that U152 could have come to this island in a few dozen different events and migrations.

Titus Valerius
01-22-2018, 01:41 PM
20962
Hi all! Take a look at this map of U152 distribution.

Romilius
01-22-2018, 02:04 PM
20962
Hi all! Take a look at this map of U152 distribution.

It's a little bit old... See Ireland: we recognized that the greatest number of U152 are in the Cork area and in the map above that area is that with few U152.

Titus Valerius
01-22-2018, 05:57 PM
The blue in the map today is even more blue!

Litz
01-22-2018, 06:05 PM
That map was from 2011

Titus Valerius
01-23-2018, 02:58 AM
Ok the map was from 2011, but in my area the U152s found, increased!!

Titus Valerius
01-23-2018, 03:03 AM
For " my area" I mean Eastern Liguria.
Of course U152s found in Europe increased, as in Ireland, but in my area there's the largest number of U152s

Romilius
01-24-2018, 12:04 PM
For " my area" I mean Eastern Liguria.
Of course U152s found in Europe increased, as in Ireland, but in my area there's the largest number of U152s

The greatest concentration of U152 is Brescia, as per Boattini et al. 2013.

It is interesting, because Brescia was also a very important town in imperial roman era.

I think that it would be even more important to study the percentage of U152 and subclades in Piacenza and Cremona, two Roman colonies inhabited from the beginning by Roman citizens.

Titus Valerius
01-24-2018, 02:04 PM
But I know something you don't know , in addition I have tested 20 friends of mine and I have found 14 U152s. The blue in the map is my area

Romilius
01-24-2018, 03:40 PM
But I know something you don't know , in addition I have tested 20 friends of mine and I have found 14 U152s. The blue in the map is my area

What? Something I don't know? I rely upon published papers... I don't know if you are aware of new academical papers that are going to be published soon, or if the Holy Spirit is your source...

In addition, in Boattini et al. you can find also La Spezia results.

Principe
01-24-2018, 03:51 PM
But I know something you don't know , in addition I have tested 20 friends of mine and I have found 14 U152s. The blue in the map is my area

What are the other 6? Liguria is really under represented in many genetic companies.

MitchellSince1893
01-24-2018, 04:11 PM
But I know something you don't know , in addition I have tested 20 friends of mine and I have found 14 U152s. The blue in the map is my area

Can you share what their U152 subclades are?

Titus Valerius
01-24-2018, 07:21 PM
What? Something I don't know? I rely upon published papers... I don't know if you are aware of new academical papers that are going to be published soon, or if the Holy Spirit is your source...

In addition, in Boattini et al. you can find also La Spezia results.

Holy Spirit is not my source, but new paper not yet published I can't talk about! In 2013 Dr. Boattini found in Brescia 20 U152s over 39 men tested = 51% in my area Dr. Boattini found 9 U152s over 24 men tested 38%. But in 2018 we know much more.... One day everyone will know.
In addition there are my friends and 15 U152s /21 = 71% it's a very high percentage!

Romilius
01-24-2018, 07:38 PM
Holy Spirit is not my source, but new paper not yet published I can't talk about! In 2013 Dr. Boattini found in Brescia 20 U152s over 39 men tested = 51% in my area Dr. Boattini found 9 U152s over 24 men tested 38%. But in 2018 we know much more.... One day everyone will know.
In addition there are my friends and 14 U152s /20 = 70% it's a very high percentage!

E vabbé, adesso che hai lanciato il sasso nascondi la mano?

Sorry for non-italian speakers...

But, will know what? Do those results from 2018 living people tell us something about R-U152 history in the Peninsula? I'm afraid no.

DillonResearcher
01-24-2018, 07:49 PM
Can I politely suggest that we discuss U152 in Italy in a separate, new thread to avoid confusion with Ireland?

Titus Valerius
01-24-2018, 07:50 PM
Can you share what their U152 subclades are?

I have found 3 U152s+ whose subclade has yet to be discovered- 2 U152s+ Z56+ Z72+ 1 U152+ Z71+ - 1 U152 Z56* 2 U152s+ L2+ L20+ - 2 U152s + L2+ Z142+ FGC22942+ 1 U152+ Z36+ - 3 U152s + L2+ whose subclade has yet to be discovered.
In addition I have found 1 R1b L21+ S5488+ - 1 R1b DF100+ S14328+ 1 L L879+ 1 R1b L277+ 1 E M34 PH3893+ 2 E V13+

Titus Valerius
01-24-2018, 07:57 PM
Sorry Romilius, but I can not talk about it! So Dillon said right , this is not the right thread to talk about the Italian tests.

lamahorse
01-24-2018, 08:03 PM
My paternal ancestry is from Skibbereen, West Cork. The map is interesting as it remains speculation why there is such a large concentration of U152+ males in the county. Off the top of my head, U152 accounts for something like 2% of all Y lineages in Ireland so the increased frequency in Cork is very interesting.

Is there any information on the extent of Y testing for this map within Ireland as I feel that these frequency maps are quite misleading. There are definitely inbuilt selection biases into genetic testing (people who care about genetics/genealogy and the financial means to afford it as it isn't cheap). I feel a more reflective survey of the haplogroups of irish men would be one that focused on families that have been farming the same land since the 1800s.

DillonResearcher
01-24-2018, 08:30 PM
My paternal ancestry is from Skibbereen, West Cork. The map is interesting as it remains speculation why there is such a large concentration of U152+ males in the county. Off the top of my head, U152 accounts for something like 2% of all Y lineages in Ireland so the increased frequency in Cork is very interesting.

Is there any information on the extent of Y testing for this map within Ireland as I feel that these frequency maps are quite misleading. There are definitely inbuilt selection biases into genetic testing (people who care about genetics/genealogy and the financial means to afford it as it isn't cheap). I feel a more reflective survey of the haplogroups of irish men would be one that focused on families that have been farming the same land since the 1800s.

I agree, the Cork concentration is really interesting since it seems so pronounced and there must have been multiple migrations of U152+ men to Ireland and yet they seem to have mainly gone to Cork.

I have asked the Irish DNA Atlas again about Y-DNA data and they say that they currently have generated no Y-DNA data and are considering the next step of analysis which may or may not contain Y-DNA.

Pylsteen
01-31-2018, 11:43 AM
Is it known if Cork has other concentrations of subclades outside of U152 compared to the rest of Ireland?

hadleyro1
04-22-2018, 10:07 PM
I'm one of the Americans hunting for answers and finding more puzzles. My story goes L2-Z367-Z34-BY3604-Z275 with my terminal haplogroup (for now I guess) being PH137. We can track my ancestry on paper to Simon Hadley who was from Dublin and then moved to West Meath as part of a Quaker settlement. He came to the states about 1712.
Our theory is he came to Ireland from England but have yet to find DNA proof to support the theory. All of the other sites have me listed as Irish/Scandinavian with NO English basis. I'll look forward to the day we can learn more which was what brought me here. My results are on YFull if anyone cares to review. Happy hunting to all.

jcmax68
08-06-2019, 12:28 AM
I have no surnames for the Genographic Project data (which is a huge downside of that dataset) but the U152 project surnames are as follows:

Platt
Dillon (me)
Boals
Butler
Grady
Lyttle
Maher
McCarroll/Carroll
Ballard
Dalton (similar surname to me but different subclade of L2 before anyone asks!)
Baird
McAvity
Jones
Fox
Kennedy
Collins
McCarthy
Barry (seems to be Norman from Flanders)
Johnston
Winters
Landers
O'Nolan
Wilson
Shannon
Long
MacKay
Allan
Straghan
McCracken
Black
Donachy
Erskine
McGill


By the way, these surnames are publically available on the FTDNA project website so I don't think I am breaching any privacy rules by listing these.

I wasn't on FTDNA in 2017, but I am U152. Surname Wilkinson. MDKA out of Antrim Ireland, though Y37 and Y67 matching suggests Scottish origin prior to Ulster.