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rms2
01-08-2018, 10:19 PM
Let's face it: you know who your mother is, but there is always the slight chance that the man you think is your father might not actually be your father. One of the great things I have gained from y-dna testing (not that I ever doubted my mom) is confirmation that my y-dna paper trail is correct. My dad is my dad (confirmed by both y-dna testing and autosomal dna testing).

I have an exact 37-marker match with a second cousin once removed (37 markers is as far as he has gone). Our mrca is my second great grandfather (his great grandfather). I have an exact 111-marker match with a man whose grandfather is the brother of my grandfather (i.e., our mrca is our mutual great grandfather).

Beyond that, as far as I can trace my y-dna line is my third great grandfather, born in 1804. I can confirm my descent from him because I have numerous close 111-marker matches (as close as 109/111) with men with my surname who go beyond my third great grandfather, all the way to a most recent common ancestor who was born about 1650.

Not only that, but I have my y-dna test results confirmed by two dna testing companies, FTDNA and BritainsDNA (my mtDNA is also confirmed by both of them).

That all makes me pretty happy, and grateful to my faithful paternal female ancestors. God bless you. (Oh, and my two sons also match me, which is good to know.)

20651

spruithean
01-08-2018, 11:07 PM
I also gained confirmation of my direct paternal tree, atleast to my most distant documented known ancestor. I match paternal cousins ranging from 2C2R to 3C3R, I also have autosomal matches with female relatives of these paternal cousins in the 4C range.

I hope Big Y can shed some light on some more distant things and perhaps one day I can push my paternal tree beyond my brickwall.

rms2
01-09-2018, 01:18 AM
Guess we've been blessed. I know of a few guys with apparent NPE's in their y-dna line. One I know of discovered that the man he thought was his father wasn't his father. That's got to be tough.

rms2
05-27-2018, 03:12 PM
We just got back home last night after three days out in California to attend my father's funeral. Since my dad was retired military, he was buried in the Sacramento Valley National Cemetery, Dixon, California, with full military honors.

His tombstone won't be ready for 30-60 days. Right now there is a temporary marker at his grave site. My mother and I chose the Celtic Cross pictured below (#41 on the list of available religious emblems) for inscription on my dad's tombstone.

It was a tough three days, but it was nice to see family and old friends.

23497

Celt_??
05-27-2018, 08:43 PM
And a really un-great thing about Y-DNA testing is when one discover that he DOES NOT match his supposed ancestors! In my surname project, out of 48 US members 7 appear to be NPE - they do not match any other members with our surname or with each other.

rms2
05-27-2018, 10:10 PM
And a really un-great thing about Y-DNA testing is when one discover that he DOES NOT match his supposed ancestors! In my surname project, out of 48 US members 7 appear to be NPE - they do not match any other members with our surname or with each other.

I'm not sure that is un-great: unpleasant at first, sure, but the truth beats falsehood every time.

I'm glad I didn't have to go through that though.

Saetro
05-28-2018, 12:06 AM
We just got back home last night after three days out in California to attend my father's funeral. Since my dad was retired military, he was buried in the Sacramento Valley National Cemetery, Dixon, California, with full military honors.

His tombstone won't be ready for 30-60 days. Right now there is a temporary marker at his grave site. My mother and I chose the Celtic Cross pictured below (#41 on the list of available religious emblems) for inscription on my dad's tombstone.

It was a tough three days, but it was nice to see family and old friends.

23497

Just back from a close uncle's funeral myself. The last of that generation of my ancestors are departing rapidly now.

Surprised that your father's tombstone will be ready so soon.
After long cemetery studies including records from a monumental mason (the people who cut/inscribe tombstones) they seem to leave 6 months for the ground to settle before anything goes on top - although a headstone would perhaps go in earlier.
Veteran's monuments are paid for here by the government, but that means additional delays while text is agreed with the government.
They are fairly reasonable within their basic format of stone or brass plaque designs, but it is an additional delay.
I am constantly shocked by Hollywood having the gravestone already in place at a funeral on film or TV.

rms2
05-28-2018, 02:39 AM
Just back from a close uncle's funeral myself. The last of that generation of my ancestors are departing rapidly now.

Surprised that your father's tombstone will be ready so soon.
After long cemetery studies including records from a monumental mason (the people who cut/inscribe tombstones) they seem to leave 6 months for the ground to settle before anything goes on top - although a headstone would perhaps go in earlier.
Veteran's monuments are paid for here by the government, but that means additional delays while text is agreed with the government.
They are fairly reasonable within their basic format of stone or brass plaque designs, but it is an additional delay.
I am constantly shocked by Hollywood having the gravestone already in place at a funeral on film or TV.

60 days is what the cemetery director told us, but he said they often have them in place in 30 days.

Ais
05-28-2018, 02:53 AM
We just got back home last night after three days out in California to attend my father's funeral. Since my dad was retired military, he was buried in the Sacramento Valley National Cemetery, Dixon, California, with full military honors.

His tombstone won't be ready for 30-60 days. Right now there is a temporary marker at his grave site. My mother and I chose the Celtic Cross pictured below (#41 on the list of available religious emblems) for inscription on my dad's tombstone.

It was a tough three days, but it was nice to see family and old friends.

23497

I'm really sorry to hear that. I recently lost my father, not long after you made this thread actually, and I'm still dealing with it. Funnily enough, I took my Ancestry DNA test not long after he died, and inadvertently proved his paternity by finding a second cousin on his line!

firemonkey
05-28-2018, 06:19 AM
My interest in Y dna testing is to try and place my direct surname line. As a person with a relatively rare surname(roughly 1,200 including variant spellings according to Forebears) and being in a paragroup this is proving a fruitless task. I have one surname match with GD of 2 at 37markers who has resolutely declined to test further , be it it Y or autosomal , despite my offering to pay for it.

Osiris
05-28-2018, 07:57 AM
I totally agree that the resolution offered by the Y chromosome and it's very specific inheritance allows us to make certain discoveries not available with other DNA types. Of the 3 male lines I've worked on 2 have pushed the surname far past the earliest known ancestors. Unfortunately I have some sort of issue in my line back in Tennessee in the 1850s. What's amazing is that with a couple Big Ys I know the name of my 2nd great grandfather's grandfather or great grandfather. Someday I hope to link the two lines definitively. I'm dying to know what really happened.

Radboud
05-28-2018, 04:03 PM
It's cool to see that you second cousin etc also tested it's Y-haplogroup rms2! Personally, I don't have much luck yet because my surname is quite rare and my family members are not that interested in DNA tests. I have found only one person with the same surname as me on 23andme. We have the same but quite distant ancestors.(7th grandparents) He also belongs to the haplogroup U106, but 23andme did not test him beyond this subclade. He mentioned it was ''not determined'' if he is positive for L48.

slievenamon
05-28-2018, 04:36 PM
The grand benefit of yDNA for me was to discover five subclades below our terminal SNP. I had always known we arrived in Ireland at or before the Invasion, but how to prove it? Families from ancient Ossory, who claimed to know my genealogy better than I, would prove enormously helpful! It only took fifteen years. My family motto is "Patience is Victorious". Truer words were never spoken...

Sorry for your troubles, Rich. May your Father Rest in Peace.

geebee
05-28-2018, 06:26 PM
Actually, you never quite know what test will yield good finds, or when.

Back when Ancestry offered Y-DNA and mtDNA testing, they were the first company I tried. A number of years passed and in that time I tested several different companies -- FTDNA, 23andMe, and Ancestry again for autosomal testing. But after I'd almost forgotten about my Y-DNA testing at Ancestry, someone contacted me to say that her uncle and I were near-perfect matches on 46 markers.

So I took a look, and we were only off by one. But when I took a closer look, we actually weren't off at all. Ancestry had made an error in how they reported one of our STRs. It was a normally two-copy marker that in our case had three copies: 9, 10, 10 for both of us. Only, contrary to convention Ancestry was showing it on the match page as 9, 10 for me and 10, 10 for my match. So while it looked like there was a genetic distance of 1, there really wasn't. (The convention is that you always list repeats in ascending numerical order.)

I recognized her uncle, by the way. He was a former lieutenant governor of Delaware, with the same unusual surname I have. I'd always figured we were probably related, but I'd never been able to prove it. In fact, with some additional research I was able to determine that we were 4th cousins, twice removed; with the surname immigrant as our most recent common ancestor.

One funny thing, though. When Ancestry thought there was a GD of 1, they predicted we were related in about 6 generations. Once I contacted them and pointed out their error and they fixed it, they changed the prediction to just one. That would have come as a real surprise to my dad, since basically this match was from his father's generation. (And even my grandfather and my match were 4th cousins.)

So even this old 46-marker test from Ancestry eventually proved to be of great value to me.

spruithean
05-30-2018, 10:19 PM
I'm not sure that is un-great: unpleasant at first, sure, but the truth beats falsehood every time.

I'm glad I didn't have to go through that though.

I agree, I would much rather know the truth about a secret in my family tree.