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Mixed
01-09-2018, 06:56 PM
I have done a search and have not found anything.

https://homedna.com/product/gps-origins-algorithm

karwiso
01-09-2018, 07:36 PM
Save your money for something else - test another (potential) relative!
I have read their product description and they write that they use 100 SNP and 13 CODIS Y-markers... Aren't you happy with your FTDNA, Ancestry or 23andme test? Go to gedmatch.com, geni.com or transfer your results to MyHeritage free of charge. Probably test with LivingDNA if you want another "fishing" pool... Or why not to save money for a WGS-test, BigY or YElite? Just forget GPS Origins, I would NOT transfer my (much more complete) data to them!

Mixed
01-09-2018, 08:01 PM
Save your money for something else - test another (potential) relative!
I have read their product description and they write that they use 100 SNP and 13 CODIS Y-markers... Aren't you happy with your FTDNA, Ancestry or 23andme test? Go to gedmatch.com, geni.com or transfer your results to MyHeritage free of charge. Probably test with LivingDNA if you want another "fishing" pool... Or why not to save money for a WGS-test, BigY or YElite? Just forget GPS Origins, I would NOT transfer my (much more complete) data to them!

I've done most of those except..........WGS-test, BigY or YElite.

karwiso
01-09-2018, 08:31 PM
Well, I have not seen anyone recommending GPS Origins. You have got your migration maps here and there, you would not get more at GPS origins and I don't think their user base is much bigger than Ancestry's, FTDNA's or 23andme's.

WGS, Big or YElite are more expensive and are more for Y-tree with SNPs, but I would go that way (plus yfull.com). Probably we can use WGS at gedmatch.com later, but it is hard to say now if and how. You can submit your WGS results to yfull.com as well plus you will get possible future autosomal SNP's in the results.

Adrian Stevenson
01-10-2018, 07:37 PM
I looked at this some years ago, but I could not submit my old Britain's DNA results to them back.

Anyway, this thread last night reminded me about them and I took another look. So for just for the sake of it (as I had a few dollars in my PayPal account which is not real money ;) ) I thought I would blow $39 on it. I submitted my FTDNA family finder results and the results came back in a few hours.

I got back these results:

GENE POOL % s
Complete Results

#1 Fennoscandia 20.2%
Origin: Peaks in the Iceland and Norway and declines in Finland, England, and France

#2 Southern France 19.6%
Origin: Peaks in south France and declines in north France, England, Orkney islands, and Scandinavia

#3 Orkney Islands 12.9%
Origin: Peaks in the Orkney islands and declines in England, France, Germany, Belarus, and Poland

#4 Western Siberia 11.6%
Origin: Peaks in Krasnoyarsk Krai and declines towards east Russia

#5 Sardinia 8.9%
Origin: Peaks in Sardinia and declines in weaker in Italy, Greece, Albania, and The Balkans

#6 Southeastern India 8.7%
Origin: Endemic to south eastern india with residues in Pakistan

#7 Basque Country 7.4%
Origin: Peaks in France and Spain Basque regions and declines in Spain, France, and Germany

#8 Tuva 5.1%
Origin: Peaks in south Siberia (Russians: Tuvinian) and declines in North Mongolia

#9 Northern India 3%
Origin: Peaks in North India (Dharkars, Kanjars) and declines in Pakistan

#10 The Southern Levant 1%
Origin: This gene pool is localized to Israel with residues in Syria

#11 Pima County: The Sonora 0.9%
Origin: Peaks in Central-North America and declines towards Greenland and Eskimos

#12 Western South America 0.5%
Origin: Peaks in Peru, Mexico, and North America and declines in Eastern Russia

#13 Bougainville 0.1%
Origin: Peaks in Bougainville and declines in Australia

The map shows this "route".

20697

I look upon it all as a bit of fun, nothing else. Their group definitions are a bit bizarre I think.

Cheers, Ade.

lukaszM
01-14-2018, 10:25 PM
Very bizzare. You have really about 10% Indian ancestry and 5% Tuvan?:)

01-18-2018, 01:45 AM
I've tried GPS Origins and here are my results: (I think Western Siberia might be more inclined towards the Indo-European expansions)

#1 Southeastern India 44.6%
Origin: Endemic to south eastern india with residues in Pakistan

#2 Southwestern India 12%
Origin: Endemic to Indian (Pulayar) with residues in India (Paniya, Savara, Bengali, Juang, Savara, Ho, Bonda)

#3 Northern India 9.8%
Origin: Peaks in North India (Dharkars, Kanjars) and declines in Pakistan

#4 Tuva 6.8%
Origin: Peaks in south Siberia (Russians: Tuvinian) and declines in North Mongolia

#5 Western Siberia 6.3%
Origin: Peaks in Krasnoyarsk Krai and declines towards east Russia

#6 Central America 3.5%
Origin: Peaks in Mexico and Central America with residues in Peru

#7 Austronesian Southeast Asia 2.7%
Origin: Peaks in Taiwan and Malay and declines in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and South China

#8 Orkney Islands 2.6%
Origin: Peaks in the Orkney islands and declines in England, France, Germany, Belarus, and Poland

#9 Austronesian Oceania 2.5%
Origin: Peaks in Korea, Chinese (Han), Mynamar, Japan, and Vietnam and declines towards West China and India

#10 Papuan New Guinea 2.2%
Origin: Peaks in Papua New Guinea and declines in Australia

#11 Southern France 2.1%
Origin: Peaks in south France and declines in north France, England, Orkney islands, and Scandinavia

#12 Pima County: The Sonora 1.8%
Origin: Peaks in Central-North America and declines towards Greenland and Eskimos

#13 Arabia 1.6%
Origin: Peaks in Saudi Arabia and Yemen and declines in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, and Egypt

#14 Bougainville 1.2%
Origin: Peaks in Bougainville and declines in Australia

#15 Western South America 0.4%
Origin: Peaks in Peru, Mexico, and North America and declines in Eastern Russia

Kurki
01-21-2018, 12:51 AM
I came out with a lot of these same populations. It's kind of an odd one. It did echo my ancestry at top (though low) and then seemed to exaggerate findings from other assessments (like 14% Siberian... that's kind of excessive, but I really interpret Siberian as Yakut, Evenki, Nganasan, or coming from northern Komi or Karelia areas...not central Asia). ?? I do get Russian mixed in with my expected Scandinavian on other assessments, so I don't know if they are lacking a central Russia reference or what here. Among other stuff. Are they just comparing you like the dot system...how close you are to these populations? Because the bottom ones get far fetched. I might even have some pan-American DNA (Siberian Chukchi) at small amounts, but it would still be a stretch to figure out how it gets assigned to Peru.

The migration stories were interesting. I didn't take them literally, but the world history added in was interesting. Just a couple paragraphs. It did inspire a little research. But I'm not sold on the idea that I had ancestors in Estonia around 500 AD because I am not so sure they had a Swedish population in order to figure out if I was Swede/Russian or Estonian. So it just reads like an interesting story. This was all basically interesting and yet probably the least helpful. I did start researching the Khazars, but there's a good chance they have nothing to do with my story. Just interesting.

I can't seem to copy-paste it so will just add like this...
Fennoscandia: 24.5%
Southern France: 15.7%
Western Siberia: 14.5% (I think of Western Siberia as maybe Komi but it says it peaks in Krasnoykrai, which is central, and declines towards the east... confusing a bit)
Orkney Islands: 13.5%
Southern India: 7.9% (doubt that one)
Then.., Basque, Sardinia, Tuva, Northern India, Central America, Bougainville, Pima County

Askye
01-22-2018, 08:56 PM
Save your money for something else - test another (potential) relative!
I have read their product description and they write that they use 100 SNP and 13 CODIS Y-markers... Aren't you happy with your FTDNA, Ancestry or 23andme test? Go to gedmatch.com, geni.com or transfer your results to MyHeritage free of charge. Probably test with LivingDNA if you want another "fishing" pool... Or why not to save money for a WGS-test, BigY or YElite? Just forget GPS Origins, I would NOT transfer my (much more complete) data to them!

The GPS Origins analyzes over 800,000 markers, 36 gene pools and 862 reference populations.
I found it to accurately dovetail with other results from 5 other companies and my favored Gedmatch Oracles.
Even the origin maps jibed with my very distant ancestry paper trail which I found hilarious. What are the odds?
Also, it teased out a tiny % that I have now confirmed as real.
"Northwestern Africa 0.6%
Origin: Peaks in Algeria and declines in Morocco and Tunisia." Pretty splendid.
For 39 bucks, it was worthwhile. Actually, I found a coupon so I got it for 24 bucks.

kingjohn
01-23-2018, 01:51 PM
all i remember that
a person from a syrian background
uploaded his raw data to GPS
and they gave him something very northern european {viking}
that was wierd ....... :\

mwauthy
01-23-2018, 06:50 PM
$39 is a bit pricey for a transfer. I think FTDNA is smart by charging only $19. Anything above $20 is hard to rationalize with free transfers from Myheritage, Gencove, and DNA Land available. $5 for Geneplazaís K29 was also a no brainer in my opinion.

Kurki
01-25-2018, 01:46 AM
$39 is a bit pricey for a transfer. I think FTDNA is smart by charging only $19. Anything above $20 is hard to rationalize with free transfers from Myheritage, Gencove, and DNA Land available. $5 for Geneplaza’s K29 was also a no brainer in my opinion.

That's true. They add in more by telling you this migration history, which other companies don't do. And that's very compelling. But I got it and it was really meh, and I realized there was no way to know this anyway. They probably left out Sweden. And there was only a little story about England to Scotland and Estonia to Russia, 1500 years ago or so. Its not like some narrative on how my family ended up in Scandinavia and what their points of location might have been along the way. And I probably got suckered into thinking that was possible to figure out. For $40 that would seem worth it. But it is just another DNA transfer with a little extra history. I'd put more than $5 on it. But the ancestry ratios are so weird... If they were more accurate, maybe it's a $15 (20 max?), if they could get ancestry closer. Then migration stories would be more interesting, even if still taken with a grain of salt.

mwauthy
01-26-2018, 01:54 AM
That's true. They add in more by telling you this migration history, which other companies don't do. And that's very compelling. But I got it and it was really meh, and I realized there was no way to know this anyway. They probably left out Sweden. And there was only a little story about England to Scotland and Estonia to Russia, 1500 years ago or so. Its not like some narrative on how my family ended up in Scandinavia and what their points of location might have been along the way. And I probably got suckered into thinking that was possible to figure out. For $40 that would seem worth it. But it is just another DNA transfer with a little extra history. I'd put more than $5 on it. But the ancestry ratios are so weird... If they were more accurate, maybe it's a $15 (20 max?), if they could get ancestry closer. Then migration stories would be more interesting, even if still taken with a grain of salt.

I decided to do it regardless. My friend did as well. It seems most Western/Northwestern Europeans seem to get the same regions including Siberia and India. The percentages might vary by a few percentage points.

The migration paths are interesting. Iím French Canadian and Belgian and I usually register about 25-31% Southwestern Europe on ethnicity tests. One of my migration paths was in Spain and is dated from 2189 BC - 125 BC. Considering the similarities between Southern France and Spain this migration path made sense.

The other migration path was more confusing. It goes from Lithuania to the Ukraine and is dated 90 AD - 1177 AD. I score very little Eastern European on most ethnicity tests so Iím more puzzled by this one.

RobinBMc
01-26-2018, 02:45 AM
$39 is a bit pricey for a transfer. I think FTDNA is smart by charging only $19. Anything above $20 is hard to rationalize with free transfers from Myheritage, Gencove, and DNA Land available. $5 for Geneplaza’s K29 was also a no brainer in my opinion.

I did it - it is a bit much for a transfer, but I wanted to check it out to review it for my blog. I was not impressed - ethnicity report wasn't very accurate and "migration routes" were confusing and seemed to be deliberately misleading.

Aiden
01-15-2020, 06:38 PM
GPS Origins supposedly tests over 800,000 SNPs, which is the largest coverage of any ancestry test. I’m kinda tempted to give this one a try

jonahst
01-15-2020, 07:07 PM
I did it for my mom. It was developed by Eran Elhaik to "prove" the Khazar myth. As expected, it's terrible but my mom's results did inadvertently disprove his theory by saying she's half Iberian, half Palestinian. It assumes that everyone is the product of a recent 2-way mixture, so it's basically just a glorified 2-way GEDmath Oracle. And the ancient breakdown makes no sense. I'll post images of her results later tonight.

mildlycurly
01-15-2020, 08:06 PM
I did it for my mom. It was developed by Eran Elhaik to "prove" the Khazar myth. As expected, it's terrible but my mom's results did inadvertently disprove his theory by saying she's half Iberian, half Palestinian. It assumes that everyone is the product of a recent 2-way mixture, so it's basically just a glorified 2-way GEDmath Oracle. And the ancient breakdown makes no sense. I'll post images of her results later tonight.

You'd think Elhaik, as a Jewish geneticist, would think better than to:

1. Keep trying to push a long-discredited theory. Yes, some Khazarians converted to Judaism and yes, some Ashkenazim have Khazarian ancestry. It does not mean that Khazarians are the primary founding population of Ashkenazi Jews. At this point it's like watching those fundamentalist Christian "scientists" trying to "prove" Young Earth Creationism.

2. Embrace an ideology for which the supporters are overwhelmingly neo-Nazis.

jonahst
01-15-2020, 09:56 PM
You'd think Elhaik, as a Jewish geneticist, would think better than to:

1. Keep trying to push a long-discredited theory. Yes, some Khazarians converted to Judaism and yes, some Ashkenazim have Khazarian ancestry. It does not mean that Khazarians are the primary founding population of Ashkenazi Jews. At this point it's like watching those fundamentalist Christian "scientists" trying to "prove" Young Earth Creationism.

2. Embrace an ideology for which the supporters are overwhelmingly neo-Nazis.

His work is transparently political and he has a very strange obsession with discrediting any connection Ashkenazim (and, to be fair, most other Jews) have to ancient Israelites.

jonahst
01-15-2020, 11:28 PM
My mom's results:

https://i.imgur.com/ECl5XxI.png

https://i.imgur.com/rDWIbPe.png

And probably the most absurd part:

https://i.imgur.com/LDDe29X.png

passenger
01-15-2020, 11:44 PM
:lol: Wow, that's pretty bad.

jonahst
01-16-2020, 12:32 AM
:lol: Wow, that's pretty bad.

What I find especially funny is that on the HomeDNA website, a Palestinian Muslim posted her results in a review and the test said she's half North Caucasian, half Yemeni.

sdrucker
01-22-2020, 04:07 AM
I'd long since forgotten I'd done mine last summer, but it seems that I single handedly disproved the Khazar mythology :) :

Migration A (before 584 AD): Israel to Cyprus -
First point: Latitude: 31.624, Longitude: 35.413, Radius: 17.7582 miles which puts my ancient ancestry somewhere between Qumran and Ein Gedi off of the Dead Seat
Second point: Latitude: 32.43, Longitude: 34.873, Radius: 15.3027 miles which would be somewhere between Yavneh and Caesarea near the Mediterranean coast
Third point: somewhere on Cyprus, radius is too large to indicate more

Migration B: Balearic Islands to roughly Granada (GPS Origins has this as "Algeria" but that's somewhat odd)

As a blonde Ashkenazi, my ancestors sure took a wrong turn! And the % Admixture mix is just absurd to support this finding:

Gene Pool Percentages
Complete Results
#1 Fennoscandia 15.5%
Origin: Peaks in the Iceland and Norway and declines in Finland, England, and France

#2 Basque Country 12.8%
Origin: Peaks in France and Spain Basque regions and declines in Spain, France, and Germany

#3 Southern France 10.3%
Origin: Peaks in south France and declines in north France, England, Orkney islands, and Scandinavia

#4 Orkney Islands 8.7%
Origin: Peaks in the Orkney islands and declines in England, France, Germany, Belarus, and Poland

#5 Tuva 8.7%
Origin: Peaks in south Siberia (Russians: Tuvinian) and declines in North Mongolia

#6 The Southern Levant 8.7%
Origin: This gene pool is localized to Israel with residues in Syria

#7 Western Siberia 7.9%
Origin: Peaks in Krasnoyarsk Krai and declines towards east Russia

#8 Sardinia 6.8%
Origin: Peaks in Sardinia and declines in weaker in Italy, Greece, Albania, and The Balkans

#9 Southeastern India 6.4%
Origin: Endemic to south eastern india with residues in Pakistan

#10 Arabia 4.7%
Origin: Peaks in Saudi Arabia and Yemen and declines in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, and Egypt

#11 Northwestern Africa 4.6%
Origin: Peaks in Algeria and declines in Morocco and Tunisia

#12 Bougainville 1.4%
Origin: Peaks in Bougainville and declines in Australia

#13 Central America 1.3%
Origin: Peaks in Mexico and Central America with residues in Peru

#14 Northern India 1.2%
Origin: Peaks in North India (Dharkars, Kanjars) and declines in Pakistan

#15 Western South America 1%
Origin: Peaks in Peru, Mexico, and North America and declines in Eastern Russia

jonahst
01-22-2020, 04:43 AM
I'd long since forgotten I'd done mine last summer, but it seems that I single handedly disproved the Khazar mythology :) :

Migration A (before 584 AD): Israel to Cyprus -
First point: Latitude: 31.624, Longitude: 35.413, Radius: 17.7582 miles which puts my ancient ancestry somewhere between Qumran and Ein Gedi off of the Dead Seat
Second point: Latitude: 32.43, Longitude: 34.873, Radius: 15.3027 miles which would be somewhere between Yavneh and Caesarea near the Mediterranean coast
Third point: somewhere on Cyprus, radius is too large to indicate more

Migration B: Balearic Islands to roughly Granada (GPS Origins has this as "Algeria" but that's somewhat odd)

As a blonde Ashkenazi, my ancestors sure took a wrong turn! And the % Admixture mix is just absurd to support this finding:

Gene Pool Percentages
Complete Results
#1 Fennoscandia 15.5%
Origin: Peaks in the Iceland and Norway and declines in Finland, England, and France

#2 Basque Country 12.8%
Origin: Peaks in France and Spain Basque regions and declines in Spain, France, and Germany

#3 Southern France 10.3%
Origin: Peaks in south France and declines in north France, England, Orkney islands, and Scandinavia

#4 Orkney Islands 8.7%
Origin: Peaks in the Orkney islands and declines in England, France, Germany, Belarus, and Poland

#5 Tuva 8.7%
Origin: Peaks in south Siberia (Russians: Tuvinian) and declines in North Mongolia

#6 The Southern Levant 8.7%
Origin: This gene pool is localized to Israel with residues in Syria

#7 Western Siberia 7.9%
Origin: Peaks in Krasnoyarsk Krai and declines towards east Russia

#8 Sardinia 6.8%
Origin: Peaks in Sardinia and declines in weaker in Italy, Greece, Albania, and The Balkans

#9 Southeastern India 6.4%
Origin: Endemic to south eastern india with residues in Pakistan

#10 Arabia 4.7%
Origin: Peaks in Saudi Arabia and Yemen and declines in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, and Egypt

#11 Northwestern Africa 4.6%
Origin: Peaks in Algeria and declines in Morocco and Tunisia

#12 Bougainville 1.4%
Origin: Peaks in Bougainville and declines in Australia

#13 Central America 1.3%
Origin: Peaks in Mexico and Central America with residues in Peru

#14 Northern India 1.2%
Origin: Peaks in North India (Dharkars, Kanjars) and declines in Pakistan

#15 Western South America 1%
Origin: Peaks in Peru, Mexico, and North America and declines in Eastern Russia

Very similar to my mom's results (on the previous page)!