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Geborgenheit
02-03-2018, 07:33 AM
Currently, I am waiting for my results from FTDNA and I am just wondering.

Is it possible that I get a result like your haplogroup is H and that's all ? Without any further letters and numbers ?

I have read such a story about someone testing full sequence and getting such a result and now I am seriously worried.

Have some of you tested only HVR1 and HVR2 ? What are your results ? Only one letter with haplogroup prediction ?

Little bit
02-03-2018, 03:07 PM
Mine is J1c3i which isn't very deep, IMO, considering that J1c traces back around 16,000 years and J1c3 around 11,000 years. You'd think in that time, my lineage would have acquired enough mutations to go out at least a few more numbers and letters than just the singular J1c3i. First, arguably, with a legitimate extra mutation of C12858T, I'm thinking that the Phylotree could eventually squeak out an extra assignment, perhaps J1c3i1. Thinking about it, they might want to make that last letter something else because the i and 1 so close will inevitably get confused with each other, but that's not important. If the Phylotree eventually separated the 185/228 variances under J1c, they might also get some more mutations on mine. Those two mutations are extremely variable under J1c for some reason and I'm suspicious they might actually mean something, but officially Phylotree just shrugs and lumps everyone together.

So, why is my assignment relatively short when others get much longer assignments? Perhaps those long haplogroup lineages were more successful, having an explosion of carriers which resulted in many more daughter clades? Could be more favorable mitochondrial mutations or even just circumstance of time, or place. Some branches may even be more prone to mutating than others? I also think there may have been other J1c3i clades that existed but went extinct at some point. I'm guessing that my J1c3i just wasn't as successful as other clades and arguably is itself marching towards an inevitable extinction. In other words, there just aren't enough of us to compel Phylotree to form new haplogroups and we probably never really were successful on a large scale in Europe, though decently successful regionally. Or successful enough to still have descendants today. Ian Logan estimates J1c3i's at 331,200 globally. Sounds like a lot until you compare to the world population and remember that a good number are men who won't pass it down. So, assuming half are female, there might be around 165,600 J1c3i's capable of breeding more J1c3i's, though in reality, many of those won't leave descendants. Who knows, maybe there will be another ice age and my J1c3i will make a come back (J has been shown to carry mutations that favor cold tolerance.) But that's the way it goes in the fickle game of genetics. Only the fittest, and luckiest, survive. There's some fickleness in the Phylotree and naming of haplogroups, too, such that some are very well researched and identified whereas others are not. Much has to do with who is doing the testing and naming.

Hopefully you'll get the results you hope for! :beerchug:

http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/sequences_by_group/j1c3f-k_genbank_sequences.htm

evon
02-03-2018, 04:31 PM
I tested FGS, but it has not been very helpful to put it that way..

msmarjoribanks
02-03-2018, 07:51 PM
I did FGS. My understanding is that without that (with only HVR1 and HVR2), I would have only gotten K, since the coding region has the relevant mutations to go beyond that for my haplogroup (K2b2). The same was true for my dad's, but since he is also a form of K2b (K2b1a1a), that would seem to follow. Don't know if this is unusual or lots of groups are like K.

Geborgenheit
02-03-2018, 08:41 PM
Mine is J1c3i which isn't very deep, IMO, considering that J1c traces back around 16,000 years and J1c3 around 11,000 years.

Still, you have got beyond just J. :)

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Nive1526
02-03-2018, 09:57 PM
I get I3 with LivingDNA, probably around 8-9000 years old.
Edit: The raw data file contains bot HVR and coding sequence snp's, 22 in total. I3 is defined by 239C in the HVR2.

GailT
02-04-2018, 04:09 AM
Currently, I am waiting for my results from FTDNA and I am just wondering. Is it possible that I get a result like your haplogroup is H and that's all ? Without any further letters and numbers ?


It is possible but most people are in one of the named subclades of H. Most of the people who test the full sequence and are only assigned to H do have extra mutations that can be useful for finding closer matches and that could eventually be assigned to a new subclade of H. There are a very small number of people who are plain H with no extra mutations, but that is quite rare.

Geborgenheit
02-15-2018, 09:45 PM
Still waiting for my results, 2 months after ordering mtDNA test...

Robert1
02-16-2018, 12:25 AM
My wife and I tested FGS. She got H7 and I got K1a4a1f

Dewsloth
02-16-2018, 12:51 AM
Nat Geno (pre-Helix) got me to J2a1a1, which FTDNA accepted/recorded.
Then I did the "cheap" FTDNA test, and FTDNA put me back to J2a1.
Then I did the full test and they put me back to J2a1a1.
Then, months later, they updated me to J2a1a1e.

wombatofthenorth
02-27-2018, 03:33 AM
got k1a4a1 from Geno 2.0, Geno 2.0 NG, 23 (from this data we knew we were not some of the known sub-clades but didn't know about some others or if we had any extra new stuff or were maybe even just basal k1a4a1) and also k1a4a1 from FTDNA FMS

however, the FMS was interesting in that it showed that my mom and I are exact basal k1a4a1 except for two new novel stable coding region mutations, we have a distance 0 match and a distance 1 match, if they submit, we might end up forming a new k1a4a1j sub-branch and maybe a new sub-sub branch k1a4a1j1 for two of us; we have just the one distance 0 match and one distance 1 match, all the other are distance 2 or more (the distance to are all exact basal k1a4a1 of course)

the distance 0 match is to a Lithuanian and the distance 1 match is to someone who traces their strictly maternal line in Sicily back well into the 1700s

k1a4a1 doesn't seem to be a deeply Latvian mtDNA

the strictly paternal line is my mom's second least deeply traced line, what we have traced on this line does hit upon a somewhat intriguing record, the marriage record for as far back as we can go and her father is listed as running the Hollander Kruger (Dutch House/Tavern/Inn) near a major trading town of Jelgava/Mitau, Latvia. The line sort of seems ethnic Latvian, but running a place like is a bit common that relatively early on. We can't yet seem to find her baptism record sadly. The whole talk of a tavern/house/inn name the Dutch house makes one think of the Netherlands. Was it some tavern/inn frequented by Dutch traders? Did something go on at some point there? Can it explain that my mom has a few autosomal DNA matches that seem to be Dutch? And can that also explain her bit of Oceanian (Dutch were the first big European explorers of that region)?

Siciliy is pretty far out from Latvia, does the distance 1 mtDNA match hint at any sort of big time trader/explorer or does it not connect them until like 8,000 years back or something?

wombatofthenorth
02-27-2018, 03:40 AM
my dad got V3 on Geno 2.0 and 23 and V on Geno 2.0 NG and V3c on FTDNA FMS, he has no distance 0 matches but a bunch of distance 1 matches and about half his distance 1 matches seem to be from the UK and the other half from Germany; he is from Latvia, but his strictly maternal line is one of his two lines that we lose track of earlier on and it ends with an intriguing Riga birth. Sadly we can't find her marriage record and all the baptisms for her kids leave her maiden name out, all the records for her do! So all we know is a rough birth year of 1848 and place Riga, Latvia and name Anna. But that is such a common name there, a real lot of with that name born in Riga 1847-1849.
Interestingly my dad shows a decentish chunk of non-Baltic DNA, maybe 12-20% and there are few places for that much to come up, but one line that could still lead to much of that would be this line. Perhaps she was Baltic German or maybe illegit kid of some sort of Baltic German-type line or passing tradesman or solider or something? My dad seems to get some Finnish on all tests, even a trace of UK on 23, bit of Balkan on most (some hints of something maybe around Slovenia/Croatia and maybe also Romania/Ukraine, hard to be sure).

(Interestingly we are R1b-L20 which is not very Baltic at all. In fact, on FTDNA, only a single other person lists that for all of Latvia so far. Probably some sort of illegic Baltic noble's son at some point or illegit of some passing trader or soldier at some point before the year 1800.)

wombatofthenorth
02-27-2018, 03:59 AM
Still waiting for my results, 2 months after ordering mtDNA test...

wow that is crazy, my dad ordered the FMS around the same time and got it super fast, maybe 3 weeks later

vettor
02-27-2018, 04:40 AM
I began with ftdna as H2a2 , then went to H, then others ..............Ian logan suggested I go to Genbank and now I am here (below)
https://haplogroup.org/mtdna/rsrs/l123456/l23456/l2346/l346/l34/l3/n/r/r0/hv/h/h95/h95a/

now Ftdna is also showing H95a with matches in east-sweden, west-finland and gotland ............
http://dna.scangen.se/index.php?soktyp=begin&haplo_sel=H95a&lang=en&show=search

Geborgenheit
02-27-2018, 06:52 PM
k1a4a1 doesn't seem to be a deeply Latvian mtDNA


Only 2.3% of Latvians belong to the K haplogroup, according to this:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-1809.2005.00238.x/pdf

Jenny
02-27-2018, 07:58 PM
I did a full sequence test too, my maternal grandmother was born in Finland. There are two exact matches in Finland, one each in Norway and Sweden. (H1b1) My pet theory, taken from a small migration map at 23andme, is that certain H women did not winter over in Iberia but took a more direct northerly route after leaving the Middle East

Saetro
03-07-2018, 05:35 AM
I did a full sequence test too, my maternal grandmother was born in Finland. There are two exact matches in Finland, one each in Norway and Sweden. (H1b1) My pet theory, taken from a small migration map at 23andme, is that certain H women did not winter over in Iberia but took a more direct northerly route after leaving the Middle East

Totally agree with your pet theory having looked at lots of results.
There appear to have been several leavings of the Middle East.
Even within my own H6, some seem to have come earlier than others.
Some early studies (Roostalu 2007 and Loogvali 2004) showed H6 spread in both east and west of ME.
And some people thought this meant that H6 originated in Central Asia, the moved west.
Later, more detailed studies showed that some went east and some went west from ME, as those in Europe and Central Asia are different branches.
This alone solidly supports your contention, as both seem to have moved out of ME some considerable time after initial move towards Europe of HV, H1, H3.

Ancient DNA shows some H6 in Europe relatively early on, but there appear to be later arrivals of subclades.
(Probably even better reported for H5).
My own H6a1b4 matches appear to be mainly from Ireland, although they are further away (as Genetic Distance) than those around Cornwall or in Scotland.
Not so many in England generally.
Suggests to me a pre-AngloSaxon arrival into the British Isles, probably.

Gabry
03-07-2018, 10:07 AM
Iíve got a test with Living dna ... they gave me the subclade of H ... which is H15 but they did not go further

maydonez
03-07-2018, 11:29 AM
23andme put me in T2b but then a friend of mine(she's doing her Phd on migration routes) checked my results, and said that I belonged to T2f4. Still she wasn't sure because some of the mutations(and since mtDNA wasn't exactly her topic), even though wegene, jameslick and other calculators backed her up.
I match T2f4 for now but I have more extras than I have matches. I have 27 extras but only 18 matches.
I will get an ftDNA mtDNA full sequence test for my mum on her birthday since she is also very curious. I will learn my mtDNA precisely only after then.

I will update this post then ;)

Geborgenheit
03-07-2018, 08:13 PM
Just checked my FTDNA profile and my results are once again delayed. 4 months for mtDna results is reality for FTDNA now. Seems like mtDna is not a priority for them.

fostert
03-07-2018, 08:40 PM
Just checked my FTDNA profile and my results are once again delayed. 4 months for mtDna results is reality for FTDNA now. Seems like mtDna is not a priority for them.

Wow, thats really an excessive wait!

I tested with FTDNA last year (full sequence mtDNA) and got J1c2e. I also tested at LivingDNA and they gave me the exact same: J1c2e. I am not aware of a deeper subclade than this for this particular assignment. 23and me only gave me J1c2.

My understanding is that since there are only some 16,569 base-pairs on the mitochondrial DNA strand (i.e. about 0.03% of the Y chromosome), it cannot differentiate very much with random mutations across time (since there aren't near as many locations that can mutate as there are on a Y-chromosome), and therefore tracing mtDNA and counting the few mutations that do occur can only lead to much more ancient differences than Y-DNA.

Geborgenheit
03-18-2018, 02:39 PM
I have got my results: H.

radioavdelning
03-19-2018, 03:09 AM
L3i2 is pretty specific as far as I know there are no sub-branches.

GailT
03-20-2018, 02:03 AM
I have got my results: H.

Did you have any extra mutations? It might be possible to place you in a proposed new subclade of H. Feel free to PM me.

Geborgenheit
03-20-2018, 07:28 PM
Did you have any extra mutations? It might be possible to place you in a proposed new subclade of H. Feel free to PM me.

Thank you.

Geborgenheit
04-02-2018, 09:31 PM
I have got my FMS results. I am an H even with Full Sequence.

maydonez
08-29-2018, 02:47 PM
Update as promised:

I have received my mtDNA full sequence results a month ago. I am T2f4. I have some differences from RSRS on all regions [HVR1 (12), HVR2 (7) and Coding region (54)] and I also have some extra mutations on 9 spots. Though, there are some T2f4's on FTD as well(I see them all on the forums for example), I have only one match from Chechnya which isn't really surprising since my mum is a Chechen. I didn't get this part, but his haplogroup shows T2, when mine is T2f4. So, how come we are a match, is actually a wonder to me. With this person, we have an exact match on HVR1 and HVR2 but not on Coding Region.
I have no other matches.

msmarjoribanks
08-29-2018, 04:32 PM
That person may not have tested the coding region, and you may need the coding region to go beyond T2.

geebee
08-29-2018, 07:56 PM
One nice thing about taking the FGS is that you may very well get a more refined haplogroup designation at some point in the future, without ever having to do additional mtDNA testing.

This happened to me. When I first took the FGS at FTDNA, there was no immediate change to my haplogroup designation. It remained as H1. But some time later -- I'm not sure how long -- I logged in to find that the designation was changed to H1bg.

This was because SNPs which had previously been considered "private" came to be recognized as defining a branch named only by its defining SNP (C16239T), and a sub-branch designated as H1bg. H1bg is defined by G5054A and C7849T.

The point is, as more people test it's possible that more SNPs currently considered "private" or "extra" may be recognized as defining SNPs, causing folks who have these SNPs to be placed in a "new" haplogroup.

EDIT:

And, yes, the defining SNPs for H1bg lie in the coding region. So I would never know that this is my haplogroup if I'd only tested HVR1 and HVR2.

msmarjoribanks
08-30-2018, 03:10 AM
K is even more extreme. HVR1 and HVR2 matches who haven't done the full sequence are just K. My dad's full sequence matches are K2b1a1a, and my full sequence matches are K2b2. Mine changed right around the time I did it, I was initially K2b and my administrator said it should be K2b2, and then it changed officially to K2b2.

emc
08-30-2018, 10:40 AM
I paid for the full sequence because I didn't want an incomplete result, but it turns out I'm just T2b...

geebee
08-30-2018, 01:21 PM
I paid for the full sequence because I didn't want an incomplete result, but it turns out I'm just T2b...

That still means you know there's not some subtype you would match better, if only you were tested for it.

I also would suspect that you have some number of "private" or "extra" mutations. If so, it's possible that one of them could represent a previously undefined haplogroup. Even if this is not the case, I still think that it's worthwhile to know that you've been fully tested and assigned to the most precise haplogroup possible.

Geborgenheit
08-30-2018, 07:37 PM
So, how come we are a match, is actually a wonder to me. With this person, we have an exact match on HVR1 and HVR2 but not on Coding Region.


The truth is that you have that match, but your common ancestor is like many thousands of years ago if you do not match in the Coding Region! Which is interesting in a historical perspective...

Geborgenheit
08-30-2018, 07:44 PM
One nice thing about taking the FGS is that you may very well get a more refined haplogroup designation at some point in the future, without ever having to do additional mtDNA testing.


Yes, eventually, but years may pass or even decades, realistically speaking.

Actually, I have changed the way I view my FMS results. Not the haplogroup designation is the most important, but the matches with genetic distance 0 in FMS and my private mutations.

emc
08-31-2018, 11:24 AM
That still means you know there's not some subtype you would match better, if only you were tested for it.

I also would suspect that you have some number of "private" or "extra" mutations. If so, it's possible that one of them could represent a previously undefined haplogroup. Even if this is not the case, I still think that it's worthwhile to know that you've been fully tested and assigned to the most precise haplogroup possible.

Yes, you're right. It's just that I was disappointed because I expected to learn more...

Dalluin
10-22-2019, 09:18 PM
Standard LivingDNA identifies me directly as T1a1

FionnSneachta
10-24-2019, 06:27 PM
Both Living DNA and FTDNA identified my haplogroup as H6a1b2. H6a1b is associated with the Yamna culture. My dad was identified as H27e with FTDNA. H27 is found in central and northern Europe, but also in Central Asia (Turkmenistan). Renaissance astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus had the haplogroup H27. My dad's second cousin is T2a1a8 according to FTDNA which would be my great grandfather's mtDNA. T2a1a is found in Europe, the Near East, Central Asia and India according to Eupedia.

JMcB
10-24-2019, 09:29 PM
Family Tree gave me H1e2 and after uploading my file to YFull, they also gave me H1e2 but appear to be adding a equivalent SNP (A15817G) at that same level.

They also gave me three Novel Variants: T2626C, A15326G & C16362T

They’re still working on their age estimates at this point, so there’s no news there.

10-24-2019, 09:46 PM
Only 2.3% of Latvians belong to the K haplogroup, according to this:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-1809.2005.00238.x/pdf

I wouldn’t be surprised if your something close to, “ H5a1 “, seems to be quite strong in Eastern Europe.

Geborgenheit
10-25-2019, 04:25 AM
I wouldn’t be surprised if your something close to, “ H5a1 “, seems to be quite strong in Eastern Europe.

I am just H in the end... with some private mutations, according to Yfull. But none of my 0 genetic distance matches have uploaded their data. They are both from Western Europe (England and France) and Eastern Europe. Probably MtDNA just mutates very slowly and 500 years for a common ancestor is a very optimistic estimate.

firemonkey
10-25-2019, 10:38 PM
H67 FTDNA CR IRE SCO most

ThaYamamoto
10-06-2020, 06:29 PM
Thought I'd just ask this here instead of making a new thread. Does your mtdna (e.g. L2a) contribute to your ancestral heritage? Or does it and mainstream calculators do not include it? Do formal stats? Is there a way of breaking down the ancestral components/admixture of mtdna? Is this perhaps possible via admix studio?

GailT
10-07-2020, 03:36 PM
Thought I'd just ask this here instead of making a new thread. Does your mtdna (e.g. L2a) contribute to your ancestral heritage? Or does it and mainstream calculators do not include it? Do formal stats? Is there a way of breaking down the ancestral components/admixture of mtdna? Is this perhaps possible via admix studio?


Yes, but it only represents your ancestry on the direct maternal lineage, and if you go back a sufficient number of generations, that direct maternal lineage represents an vanishingly small portion of your autosomal DNA, so autosomal DNA provides a much better indicator of your ancestral heritage. To put another way, going back 10 generations, your direct maternal line represents only about 1 of your 1000 ancestors.

Riverman
10-07-2020, 04:07 PM
Thought I'd just ask this here instead of making a new thread. Does your mtdna (e.g. L2a) contribute to your ancestral heritage? Or does it and mainstream calculators do not include it? Do formal stats? Is there a way of breaking down the ancestral components/admixture of mtdna? Is this perhaps possible via admix studio?

MtDNA is not even DNA in the strict sense, its not part of the chromosomes. Better you first read up on the Mitochondrion:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

It might have been swallowed by an ancestral cellform and being now in a symbiotic relationship, forming our cell's power plants:

Mitochondria generate most of the cell's supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), used as a source of chemical energy.[7] A mitochondrion is thus termed the powerhouse of the cell.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

The egg cell of the mother provides the mitochondrions and therefore the mitochondrial DNA, while the sperm cell just enters this cell and fertilises it. Therefore its totally unrelated to the rest of the chromosomal DNA and can't be used for ancestral estimations. In theory you could have a maternal ancestor from which nothing in your DNA is left, nothing at all, but the mtDNA. That's actually quite likely depending on how far you go back.

ThaYamamoto
10-07-2020, 05:43 PM
Yes, but it only represents your ancestry on the direct maternal lineage, and if you go back a sufficient number of generations, that direct maternal lineage represents an vanishingly small portion of your autosomal DNA, so autosomal DNA provides a much better indicator of your ancestral heritage. To put another way, going back 10 generations, your direct maternal line represents only about 1 of your 1000 ancestors.

But if my mtdna is ancestrally different starting only 3 generations ago, it still doesn't contribute toward ancestry?


MtDNA is not even DNA in the strict sense, its not part of the chromosomes. Better you first read up on the Mitochondrion:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

It might have been swallowed by an ancestral cellform and being now in a symbiotic relationship, forming our cell's power plants:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

The egg cell of the mother provides the mitochondrions and therefore the mitochondrial DNA, while the sperm cell just enters this cell and fertilises it. Therefore its totally unrelated to the rest of the chromosomal DNA and can't be used for ancestral estimations. In theory you could have a maternal ancestor from which nothing in your DNA is left, nothing at all, but the mtDNA. That's actually quite likely depending on how far you go back.

That's fascinating thank you. But as the African portion of my ancestry is minor, wouldn't a particularly African haplogroup have some influence over ancestral heritage, even if, as you say the mtdna isn't part of the chromosomes. In that sense if you treated the mtdna as a chromosome, would it be possible to ascertain heritage markers within it and apply that to the overall heritage total? For example this paper: Molecular and bioenergetic differences between cells with African versus European inherited mitochondrial DNA haplogroups: Implications for population susceptibility to diseases (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925443913003244) clearly demonstrates an ancestral difference between H and L haplogroups and the functions they perform. Is it not viable to describe this difference as ethnic difference? I understand that a person may be 100% autosomally European or Indian but have a haplogroup associated with vastly different ethnic groups i.e. an East-Asian/Siberian/Native one or an African one. What do you think of prescribing this as an extra component separate to the 100% total of the autosomal, e.g. 100% European + xx% "Native American mtdna". I'm just taking a stab here as I'm not well versed in the technicalities of genomics, not trying to force anything, genuinely curious as to your thoughts.

Riverman
10-07-2020, 06:01 PM
But if my mtdna is ancestrally different starting only 3 generations ago, it still doesn't contribute toward ancestry?



That's fascinating thank you. But as the African portion of my ancestry is minor, wouldn't a particularly African haplogroup have some influence over ancestral heritage, even if, as you say the mtdna isn't part of the chromosomes. In that sense if you treated the mtdna as a chromosome, would it be possible to ascertain heritage markers within it and apply that to the overall heritage total? For example this paper: Molecular and bioenergetic differences between cells with African versus European inherited mitochondrial DNA haplogroups: Implications for population susceptibility to diseases (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925443913003244) clearly demonstrates an ancestral difference between H and L haplogroups and the functions they perform. Is it not viable to describe this difference as ethnic difference? I understand that a person may be 100% autosomally European or Indian but have a haplogroup associated with vastly different ethnic groups i.e. an East-Asian/Siberian/Native one or an African one. What do you think of prescribing this as an extra component separate to the 100% total of the autosomal, e.g. 100% European + xx% "Native American mtdna". I'm just taking a stab here as I'm not well versed in the technicalities of genomics, not trying to force anything, genuinely curious as to your thoughts.

Since the mitochondria work as our cell's power plants, they have phenotypical effects. Like they can make the human body better suited to very hot or very cold climate and there are all kinds of susceptibility towards diseases or pathological forms which can lead to infertility or a variety of syndromes. But in that context, its really best to describe it as an extra, even though, as explained, the adaptive qualities can add to the overall phenotype. Like a 100 Finnic person with a hot climate adapted mtDNA might still have a vey slight disadvantage, everything else considered, in comparison to a Finn with a cold adapted mtDNA.
But a lot of this is still somewhat speculative and the true effect of some of these mutations is not fully understood. However, I wouldn't wonder if the current mtDNA haplogroup distribution being somewhat skewed by this, even more so than yDNA, which too might have been subjected to selection on a lower level.

JoeyP37
10-08-2020, 12:20 AM
It was said that haplogroup J people made more body heat and therefore it was advantageous in Northern Europe, so because of this I had predicted, long before I took a DNA test, that I was of haplogroup J, because I create a lot of body heat (which makes humid climates a special torture, as the excess heat cannot leave as efficiently), and indeed I am haplogroup J, of a subclade that is common in Northwestern Europe, where my matriline comes from, southwestern Ireland.

geebee
10-08-2020, 10:02 PM
MtDNA is not even DNA in the strict sense, its not part of the chromosomes. Better you first read up on the Mitochondrion:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

It might have been swallowed by an ancestral cellform and being now in a symbiotic relationship, forming our cell's power plants:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrion

The egg cell of the mother provides the mitochondrions and therefore the mitochondrial DNA, while the sperm cell just enters this cell and fertilises it. Therefore its totally unrelated to the rest of the chromosomal DNA and can't be used for ancestral estimations. In theory you could have a maternal ancestor from which nothing in your DNA is left, nothing at all, but the mtDNA. That's actually quite likely depending on how far you go back.

I'm sorry, but I have to correct one thing you wrote, the part of the quotation I've bolded. MtDNA absolutely is DNA, even in the strict sense. Just because it isn't in the nucleus doesn't mean it isn't DNA -- it's just a different sort of DNA than nuclear DNA.

Specifically, it's not the DNA that makes you you, but the DNA that makes your mitochondria what they are. As such, it's vitally important to your well-being, but there's a sense in which you can't even really call it "yours".

That's because, unlike your nuclear DNA, it doesn't make people who aren't identical twins unique. (People who are identical twins aren't precisely unique -- at least not at a genetic level.) You likely share virtually your exact mtDNA with a host of other people. For example, with any siblings, with your mother, her siblings, your mother's mother, your mother's mother's siblings, and so on.

I've been able to trace my mtDNA haplogroup back to a sixth great grandmother named Marie Anne Catherine Berda dit Picard, who was born in 1726 on Horn Island off the coast of what is now Mississippi. Marie Anne Catherine likely had mainly French ancestry, but my French ancestry is no more than about 3% of my overall ancestry.

Yet if I could trace back to Marie Anne Catherine's own 6th great grandmother in this line, is there any assurance that my 12th great grandmother would also be French? How about my 18th great grandmother, or my 24th great grandmother? Even over this span of time, it's likely that the mtDNA would have undergone very little change. But it's also likely that I have no nuclear DNA from this ancestor.

Except for my quibble about your first sentence, you're pretty much on the mark in the rest of what you said, and I definitely agree with your conclusion: "Therefore [mtDNA is] totally unrelated to the rest of the chromosomal DNA and can't be used for ancestral estimations."

GailT
10-09-2020, 05:04 AM
But as the African portion of my ancestry is minor, wouldn't a particularly African haplogroup have some influence over ancestral heritage.

L3b typically indicates African maternal ancestry, but that does not tell you exactly when your maternal ancestor left Africa. It's possible your maternal line left Africa several hundred to several thousand years, and thus you could have a typically African mtDNA haplogroup but still be mostly non-African in your autosomal DNA. If you tested the full mtDNA sequence and can identify a more specific subclade of L3b, and also look at the maternal ancestry of your close mtDNA matches, that might give you a better estimate of the migration history of your maternal lineage.