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Araz95
02-20-2018, 02:55 PM
Hi,

my father is carrying the mt haplogroup(subclave) J1b1(a3), is there anyone else here with the same haplogroup (or even better subclave?

If so, do you know more about this haplogroup - such as origin or research papers one could read.

Lupus82
02-21-2018, 04:55 AM
I have uploaded the raw data of my cousin onto the mtDNA haplogroup predictor.
According to the analysis, the mother of my cousin has the mtDNA haplogroup J1b1b

Dan Lee
09-01-2018, 01:46 AM
My mtDna is J1b1a1a.

LostSlough
04-07-2019, 01:40 AM
I'm also J1b1a1a, according to James Lick's site; J1b1a1 according to 23andMe. Here's what 23andMe says:

Your maternal line stems from a branch of haplogroup J called J1b1a. All the members of J1b1a descend from a woman who lived only 8,000 years ago. The distribution of her descendants was greatly influenced by the expansion of agriculture into Europe from the Middle East. J1b1a arose at the same time and place that agriculture developed in the region. Farming women and their families carried the haplogroup west through Turkey and the Balkans, then across central Europe in search of fertile soil. Today J1b1a can be found broadly across Europe, particularly in northern and western European populations.

Your maternal haplogroup, J1b1a1, traces back to a woman who lived approximately 7,000 years ago. That's nearly 280.0 generations ago! What happened between then and now? As researchers and citizen scientists discover more about your haplogroup, new details may be added to the story of your maternal line.

By 4,000 years ago an offshoot of J had made it all the way to the western edge of Europe, becoming entrenched among the Celtic-speakers of the British Isles. But even that wasn't the end of the journey. Beginning in the 8th century AD, Viking raiders who regularly pillaged coastal Britain and Ireland often sailed back home with Celtic women aboard. Some of those women carried this branch, so that today there are Norwegians and even Icelanders with the far-flung J haplogroup.

In my case, I suspect my matrilineal ancestors were Scots-Irish based on a lot of circumstantial evidence, though I haven't been able to follow the female line out of the U.S. yet.

Dan Lee
04-07-2019, 01:56 AM
My maternal grandmother was born in County Cork, Ireland, as was her mother, and grandmother. I am sure that at one time they spoke Irish-Gaelic.

Nibelung
04-07-2019, 02:03 AM
My maternal grandmother was born in County Cork, Ireland, as was her mother, and grandmother. I am sure that at one time they spoke Irish-Gaelic.

A relation of mine via a 16th century marriage

Peadar_Ua_Laoghaire (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peadar_Ua_Laoghaire)

Munster_Irish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munster_Irish) today

I hear overall Irish (Gaelic) is making a slow but solid comeback, and in the cities, where it wasn't spoken as much originally.

Dan Lee
04-07-2019, 10:07 AM
My maternal grandmother was born in County Cork, Ireland, as was her mother, and grandmother. I am sure that at one time they spoke Irish-Gaelic.

Their surnames were Dillon, Linane, and Delee. They were in West Cork.

JoeyP37
04-07-2019, 02:45 PM
My maternal line comes from the border of Counties Cork and Waterford in Ireland, and I am J1c2b. My maternal grandmother's maternal grandmother, Ellen Ryan, was born in 1873 and her birth certificate was in two languages, English and Irish Gaelic.

BMG
04-08-2019, 03:51 PM
My paternal grandmother's mtdna is J1b1a1 .Like me she is also a Christian from Kerala , India . I guess this haplogroup landed in India through indo european migrations .

Ilgar
09-17-2019, 06:34 AM
Hi, my mtdna haplogroup is J1b1 too. It is though to be semitic afaik

Araz95
09-21-2019, 11:33 PM
Hi, my mtdna haplogroup is J1b1 too. It is though to be semitic afaik

I guess, that depends on the subclave, but according what I can find about j1b1a3 it seems to be mostly European and western anatolian, which makes it a bit interesting for me. I dont believe all of the j1b1 subclaves are semitic.

Araz95
09-22-2019, 02:05 PM
From europedia:

J1b is also very common among non-R1b populations in the Middle East (notably the South Caucasus, Iran and the Arabian peninsula), although the subclades are different. The most common J1b subclade in Europe, and the one most strongly associated with Y-haplogroup R1b, is J1b1, and particularly J1b1a in Europe, which also happen to be the subclade identified in the Urnfield culture. Other subclades of J1b are restricted to the Middle East or the eastern Mediterranean.

misnomer
02-04-2020, 07:25 AM
Oldest ancient J1b1a1 mtdna is from Geoksyur (mother and daughter) in central asia dated to around 3000bce.
Oldest J1b1a3 found yet is from Gonur in central asia dated to around 2000bce.