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Afshar
02-28-2018, 12:33 PM
So I recently got an mtdna exact match with the full sequence test. Anybody know how the genetic distance works for mtdna, how to calculate the amount of years etc.

J1 DYS388=13
02-28-2018, 01:07 PM
So I recently got an mtdna exact match with the full sequence test. Anybody know how the genetic distance works for mtdna, how to calculate the amount of years etc.

https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/mtdna-testing/tell-closeness-relationship/

Afshar
02-28-2018, 01:25 PM
https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/mtdna-testing/tell-closeness-relationship/

I think this is just for the exact matches, but how does it compare when the GD=1

Pylsteen
02-28-2018, 01:32 PM
From what I heard from an admin, is that FTDNA may be too optimistic in estimating 22 generations at most for exact matches; 1000 years per mutation on average would also be possible; and then, it could also 500 or 1500 years. Because the mt-dna is so small, the margins are wide.

C J Wyatt III
02-28-2018, 02:33 PM
From what I heard from an admin, is that FTDNA may be too optimistic in estimating 22 generations at most for exact matches; 1000 years per mutation on average would also be possible; and then, it could also 500 or 1500 years. Because the mt-dna is so small, the margins are wide.

Many clades and subclades going back a thousand years per mutation into a much smaller population base?

Maybe I have something wrong with my thinking, but all of this does not seem credible to me. Here again, I find myself outside of the genetic genealogy mainstream.

Jack Wyatt

rms2
02-28-2018, 03:06 PM
I have two exact full sequence matches, a brother and his sister. I don't know how we're connected. Their most distant known mtDNA ancestor was about a generation older than mine but lived in the same county in northern Alabama on the Tennessee border. My most distant known mtDNA ancestor was born in 1878. I'm guessing the common ancestor was from two or three generations earlier.

Pylsteen
02-28-2018, 03:30 PM
Many clades and subclades going back a thousand years per mutation into a much smaller population base?


I have only 7 mutations downstream of W5. Some have more, others even less. W5 was already present in a neolithic man (Starcevo culture) 5500 BC; that's more than 7000 years for 7 mutations. Of course, that may include back-mutations. And maybe it differs per haplogroup; some locations mutate faster than others or more than once.

I have one exact match, a German. My line is Hollandic. The unknown common grandma must be at least before 1650. I guess she was a medieval West-German.

JMcB
02-28-2018, 03:53 PM
I have one exact match who comes from the same general area (Tyrone Co, Ireland) as my MDKA (Scotland) but we have no idea how we’re connected.

So far, that’s all she wrote.

Dewsloth
02-28-2018, 04:16 PM
My dad has a few H1j mtDNA matches with fellow descendants of Elizabeth Walker Warren (her husband and son-in-law were on the Mayflower) -- some of them are 0 distance and some at 1; and that's at about 400 years of "drift."

Jenny
03-01-2018, 12:40 PM
Two of my exact matches are from tiny Finland where many people are amateur genealogists. Although we can all trace our ancestors back reliably to the 1600s, we can't find a mutual ancestress. Even our family homesteads don't match aside from regions. It's frustrating!

C J Wyatt III
03-01-2018, 04:11 PM
Two of my exact matches are from tiny Finland where many people are amateur genealogists. Although we can all trace our ancestors back reliably to the 1600s, we can't find a mutual ancestress. Even our family homesteads don't match aside from regions. It's frustrating!

Very curious, too, how matches seem to come so close, but the common ancestor is nowhere to be found.

Finding Your Roots fell into this trap in the last season. A couple of times the show declared people matches based on the size of the matching segments but did not even bother to speculate who the MRCA was. I know I am talking autosomal DNA here and not mtDNA, but still ....

Jack Wyatt

Afshar
03-01-2018, 05:07 PM
Did someone compare the exact matches also on the autosomal level?

msmarjoribanks
03-01-2018, 08:06 PM
I've said this on other threads, so apologies to those who have heard it before, but my dad has lots of 0 GD matches and 1 GD matches.

His mtDNA goes back through a couple of women (mother and married daughter) who came to Massachusetts from Suffolk in 1634. Our earliest parish records for that line show baptisms in Rattlesden, Suffolk in the 1560s, so the mother (his earliest known mtDNA was living there at the time and chances are was born in Suffolk in the 1530s or 40s).

He has both 0 GD and 1 GD matches that go back to the same woman, some of whom descend from the same immigrant ancestor or her sister (so over 300 years between the common ancestor and my father's birth). Others go back to more recent common ancestors.

More interestingly, he has 0 GD matches that go back to Scotland in the same general period, as well as a 0GD match who traces his or her family back to Norway in the 1700s (the person is in Norway), and another person whose immigrant mtDNA ancestor came to the US from eastern Germany in the 1800s. So those last two in particular seem to suggest that this line's MRCA is very far back (I'd love more evidence of matches from around Europe to try to figure out if it came to Suffolk from Vikings or what, although that is a pipe dream).

On the other hand, I have a 1 GD match who is also a family finder match -- the mutation she has and I do not likely occurred in the US in the past few generations (1800s?). I have not found our exact connection, but we both trace back to the same area in the early 1800s US.

C J Wyatt III
03-01-2018, 08:27 PM
I've said this on other threads, so apologies to those who have heard it before, but my dad has lots of 0 GD matches and 1 GD matches.

Sounds like he has it better than most (when it comes to mtDNA results).

Out of curiosity do you mind giving his mtDNA haplogroup?

Thanks,

Jack

msmarjoribanks
03-01-2018, 08:38 PM
K2b1a1a. I think he has so many matches because he doesn't have extra mutations (beyond ones common for all), which is probably related to having 0 GD matches from so far back. I also think a LOT of the matches do descend from the same immigrant ancestor or relatives who came over with her, and they have been in America for a long time and tended to have lots of children and people in the US are the largest part of the testers so far, so...

I'm K2b2 and have only 1 GD=0 match and 1 GD=1 match, although some of the HVR1 matches seem to go back to similar areas so I wouldn't be surprised if they would be matches if they tested further (still wouldn't be many).

Note: weird coincidence that both my parents were K2b varieties, since K isn't that common and K2 is less common than K1 and K2b less common than K2a -- I am geek enough that I ran the numbers from the K project and figured that K1 was over 80% of K results, and of the less than 20% who were K2s, only about 25% were K2b, so roughly 5% of all Ks (in the project, at least) are K2b*, including both of my parents.

C J Wyatt III
03-01-2018, 09:01 PM
Note: weird coincidence that both my parents were K2b varieties, since K isn't that common and K2 is less common than K1 and K2b less common than K2a -- I am geek enough that I ran the numbers from the K project and figured that K1 was over 80% of K results, and of the less than 20% who were K2s, only about 25% were K2b, so roughly 5% of all Ks (in the project, at least) are K2b*, including both of my parents.

Very interesting coincidence! Odds definitely against that.

Jack

Jan_Noack
03-03-2018, 01:42 AM
From what I heard from an admin, is that FTDNA may be too optimistic in estimating 22 generations at most for exact matches; 1000 years per mutation on average would also be possible; and then, it could also 500 or 1500 years. Because the mt-dna is so small, the margins are wide.

as far as I can tell, a GD of 0 or 1 could be a match one generation ago or 4000+ years ago, so looks more stable than YDNA I guess is all one can say (ie variance, standard error, range etc higher)

Do YOU Match ancient mtDNA found in these skeletons?
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Check here - Mito list (http://biorxiv.org/highwire/filestream/40100/field_highwire_adjunct_files/1/135962-2.xlsx)
"http://biorxiv.org/highwire/filestream/40100/field_highwire_adjunct_files/1/135962-2.xlsx"

I seem to have an exact match with this K1a26 skeleton below , over 4000 years old. :)
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Have a try of these ancient mtDNA.