PDA

View Full Version : Eating egg yolks healthy or not?



utR!
08-14-2012, 04:03 PM
'Surveying more than 1200 patients, Spence found regular consumption of egg yolks is about two-thirds as bad as smoking when it comes to increased build-up of carotid plaque, a risk factor for stroke and heart attack.'

This was a bit surprising because I have thought that yolks are rich of good nutrition, not eaten too often but now and then.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120813155640.htm

tuuli

DMXX
08-14-2012, 04:12 PM
Strange seeing such a U-turn from what became the status quo last year regarding the health benefits of eating egg yolks. (http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/7301/title/Reevaluating_Eggs_Cholesterol_Risks) Researchers found that the cholesterol in egg yolks was the "good" type and they advocated people eating more eggs in their diet.

I usually eat 4 large chicken eggs a day (boiled) and have done so for half a year. By coincidence, I had a routine annual blood test this very morning. Will post my results to see if my egg-mania's skewed the "exemplary" HDL:LDL ratio I had last time round.

utR!
08-14-2012, 05:26 PM
It seems when getting older (over 40 y.) you should eat less than 2 eggs weekly. I do know some who eat daily eggs but do not smoke. What a difference then eating eggs in daily base or smoking about 10-20 cigarettes. But it is much more easier to reduce to use of eggs.

Besides you do eat eggs in many sort of biscuits, pastries and foods too.

Our coronary arteries are so tiny and I think there are many other foods which may block your veins.

I think we have so many different kind of egg in the shops some are Omega-eggs...........

Scarlet Ibis
08-14-2012, 08:38 PM
I never really took much of a chance with egg yolks. I'm a huge fan of eggs, but I've always thrown out the yolk, and only eaten the white part. Many people who have watched me cook breakfast think I'm being wasteful, but it doesn't matter to me. I believe we're living in a day and age where people need to discard the idea that it's wasteful/immoral not to eat every bit of food that's in front of us.

MikeWhalen
08-14-2012, 08:50 PM
it seems to me, that when you take all the scientific studies together, they pretty much say that eating anything is bad and will kill you, so therefore, to be healthy, you should stop eating all together

Spark
08-14-2012, 08:58 PM
it seems to me, that when you take all the scientific studies together, they pretty much say that eating anything is bad and will kill you, so therefore, to be healthy, you should stop eating all together

Exactly. I think the key here is moderation. Moderately exposing yourself to certain substances and not overdoing it is key.

Lenka
08-15-2012, 12:47 AM
it seems to me, that when you take all the scientific studies together, they pretty much say that eating anything is bad and will kill you, so therefore, to be healthy, you should stop eating all together

Exactly. And really, egg yolks are the least of most people's nutritional worries. I find them extremely delicious and satisfying so I couldn't give them up in any case.

Scarlet Ibis
08-15-2012, 12:54 AM
Y'all just haven't discovered the beauty of an egg white sandwich on toasted wheat bread. :biggrin1:

ilmari
08-15-2012, 03:15 AM
I will have to search for the data, but my father was a voracious reader of Prevention Magazine and Organic Gardening since the early '60s.

I recall a study from the late '60s / early '70s that spoke to this question.

Part of a side to that study was promoting butter over margarine for the proper fatty acids in butter.

The egg part of the study suggested that the healthiest way to eat an egg was soft boiled, firm white with runny yolk. Something about cooking the yolk hard changed the good qualities of the egg, but cooking the white to almost hard made the bad parts of the white better.

AJL
08-15-2012, 05:58 AM
The sulphur in the yolks could be doing more good than the cholestrol is bad -- it helps create various proteins the liver needs. If the liver doesn't metabolize fat well...

Clinton P
08-15-2012, 10:05 AM
I stopped eating eggs at about the age of 3.

My father had over a 100 laying hens, and as a consequence, eggs featured in a lot of my meals. So much so that I became sick of them and I haven’t eaten a single egg since.

Maybe this is a factor towards the fact that I’ve never had a stroke or a heart attack.

Clinton P

GTC
08-15-2012, 11:08 AM
Like a myriad things in life, some folks have a predisposition to high cholesterol and need to avoid certain foods while others don't.

I don't eat eggs regularly, but if I ever order a hamburger (a real one not McCrap, etc) it's always burger'n'egg.

utR!
08-15-2012, 01:46 PM
The sulphur in the yolks could be doing more good than the cholestrol is bad -- it helps create various proteins the liver needs. If the liver doesn't metabolize fat well...

I have gotten (from somewhere) an impression that fried and boiled eggs yolks have more suphur and that is why I began to fry eggs leaving them more liquid or runny. I got used to eat eggs like that. Or does boiling or frying change the yolk at all?

tuuli

utR!
08-15-2012, 01:53 PM
I stopped eating eggs at about the age of 3.

My father had over a 100 laying hens, and as a consequence, eggs featured in a lot of my meals. So much so that I became sick of them and I haven’t eaten a single egg since.

Maybe this is a factor towards the fact that I’ve never had a stroke or a heart attack.

We used to have hens too when I was living in the small farm. We did not eat too much because eggs were sold :) . Now and again we used them in baking cakes and so on.

I do understand that you got sick of them.

tuuli

Azvarohi
08-15-2012, 02:52 PM
The egg part of the study suggested that the healthiest way to eat an egg was soft boiled, firm white with runny yolk. Something about cooking the yolk hard changed the good qualities of the egg, but cooking the white to almost hard made the bad parts of the white better.

Boiled eggs have significant lower risk for food poisioning. Boiled eggs also makes your body able to absorb all the nutrients in the eggs.

Regarding the study of the thread; notice the text in the interpretation:


Our findings suggest that regular consumption of egg yolk should be avoided by persons at risk of cardiovascular disease. This hypothesis should be tested in a prospective study with more detailed information about diet, and other possible confounders such as exercise and waist circumference.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021915012005047

So people who aren't in that group of high risk individuals can relax, worrying too much isn't healthy. Life is best enjoyed in moderation.

utR!
08-15-2012, 03:53 PM
Is there any research of the benefits of boiled eggs which makes your body to absorb the nutriens better? Why it is so?

I do normally fry an egg the way the white is all fried well. You should carefully break the egg avoiding the contamination and I think yolk is not even touching the shell (this feels too exact explanation) . I have never get any disease. Also I do boil eggs for sandwitches nam nam.

Yes moderation is best in many other things in our life :) tuuli

utR!
08-15-2012, 04:22 PM
Some more links facts of eggs. It is good to view this out of many points.

http://ic.steadyhealth.com/hard_boiled_egg_nutrition.html


http://www.ehow.com/about_5445649_egg-yolk-nutrition.html

tuuli

:hungry:

AJL
08-16-2012, 03:43 AM
There's a run-down of the (fairly modest) nutritional differences here:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/544479-nutrition-of-boiled-eggs-vs-fried-eggs/

Azvarohi
08-16-2012, 10:10 AM
Something I reacted to is how the study seem to recommend people to abstain then suggest that a prospective study is needed. Not even prosepctive cohort studies can state such things and this study have even lower evidence value. Consider also that ~14% of the test subjects were diabetic.

utR!
08-16-2012, 02:25 PM
That was good. It depens on how much you use fat in frying eggs. Sometimes butter is good sometimes not. But a like oil, using it not much in a pan. Fried one has more A-vitamin and choline. I think it is quite same how you want your egg done. It's cheap food and full of good nutrition (cholesterol maybe a bit bad).


tuuli

utR!
08-16-2012, 02:31 PM
Something I reacted to is how the study seem to recommend people to abstain then suggest that a prospective study is needed. Not even prosepctive cohort studies can state such things and this study have even lower evidence value. Consider also that ~14% of the test subjects were diabetic.


It would more ideal to test younger and healthier persons. Older ones may have their veins already mid full of plague. :)

At least this studie made as thinking of our habits of eating and we are so different every one when talking about levels of the cholesterol.

tuuli

Ezana
08-16-2012, 08:31 PM
Everything in moderation.

http://www.nhs.uk/news/2012/08august/Pages/Eating-egg-yolks-as-bad-as-smoking.aspx

It's important to consider the context of every study you read.


"Eating egg yolks is as bad as smoking in speeding up coronary heart disease" the Daily Mail says, reporting that egg yolks contribute to the clogging up of arteries which, in turn, can increase the risk of heart disease.

The news is based on a Canadian study which used ultrasound to look at the fatty build-up in the arteries of around 1,200 adults who were attending a clinic because they had pre-existing risk factors for heart disease.

The adults were questioned on their smoking history, the number of egg yolks eaten per week and how long they had eaten this amount of egg yolks.

They found that a combination of smoking and egg yolk consumption was related to a fatty build-up in the arteries, which could increase the risk of heart disease as well as other conditions that can affect the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular diseases or CVDs).

This study does contain some important limitations, such as:


the accuracy of the participants’ recollections of their egg yolk consumption
a lack of detailed information on how the eggs were cooked
there may have been additional risk factors contributing to artery ‘clogging’, not assessed by the study, such as lack of exercise or alcohol consumption
while it is reasonable to assume that fatty build-up in the neck arteries can increase the risk of heart disease, it is uncertain exactly what the increased level of risk would be



This study perhaps best supports the notion of “all things in moderation”. Eggs are a good source of protein. Without further study, there is no firm evidence that egg yolks are as bad for you as smoking.


Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from the Stroke Prevention & Atherosclerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, and other research institutions in Canada and was funded by the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal: Atherosclerosis.

While the Mail reports that eating egg yolks is two-thirds as bad for you as smoking when it comes to artery build-up, this cannot be concluded when you consider the limitations of this single piece of research. Also, the headline does not make it clear that the researchers were only looking at people with pre-existing risk factors for heart disease and not the population at large.


What kind of research was this?

The authors report that although high cholesterol contributes to heart disease, there is a general lack of consensus on whether eggs actually raise blood cholesterol and contribute to heart disease.

This study aimed to examine whether egg yolk consumption was related to the fatty (plaque) build-up in the arteries of a consecutive series of adults attending a vascular clinic in Canada.

The design of this study includes several limitations:


it recruited a small, selective sample of adults
egg yolk consumption is being estimated through questionnaire responses which may contain inaccuracies
other factors not studied by the researchers, such as less exercise or a diet higher in other saturated fats, may also contribute towards a build-up of plaque




What did the research involve?

The observational study included 1,231 consecutive patients (average age, 62) referred to a vascular prevention clinic at a hospital in Canada. The total plaque area of their carotid arteries (the main arteries in the neck supplying blood to the head) was measured by ultrasound scan. At the time of referral lifestyle information was also measured by questionnaire. This included smoking history and the frequency of egg yolk consumption. From these responses the researchers calculated:


pack-years of smoking: the number of packs of cigarettes per day multiplied by the number of years of smoking
egg-yolk years: the number of egg yolks per week multiplied by the number of years consumed



The researchers specifically say that they did not assess:


alcohol intake
exercise taken
liquorice consumption (high intake of liquorice can increase blood pressure and cause problems in people with heart disease)




What were the basic results?

Overall the researchers found that, as would be expected, the extent of plaque build-up in the carotid arteries increased with age. They also found that both increased smoking and increased egg yolk consumption were associated with more plaque build-up.

Average plaque area in the carotid arteries of patients consuming less than two eggs per week (388 people) was 125mm2 compared to 132mm2 in those consuming three or more eggs per week (603 people). This was a statistically significant difference (not the result of chance).

The association was not affected by adjustment for age.

The researchers did additional analysis adjusting for other cardiovascular risk factors, such as:


sex
total blood cholesterol
blood pressure
diabetes
body mass index (BMI)
smoking


The researchers do not give figures for the build-up in the arteries associated with smoking, but say that the increase in total plaque area with increasing egg consumption followed a similar, linear pattern to that of cigarette smoking.

The highest consumption of eggs (eating more than 200 yolks per year) was said to be equivalent, in terms of plaque build-up, to two thirds of the effect of the highest amount of smoking – the figure quoted by the Mail.


How did the researchers interpret the results?

The researchers say that their findings suggest that regular consumption of egg yolk should be avoided by people at risk of cardiovascular disease. They do acknowledge though, that their theory should be tested in a prospective study that includes more detailed information about diet and other possible confounding factors, such as exercise and waist circumference.


Conclusion

This study found that egg yolk consumption was associated with increased fatty build-up in the arteries of the neck, though this was small when compared to the build-up expected with age. This study has important limitations which mean that it cannot be concluded that egg yolks are as bad for you as smoking:


Average egg yolk consumption per week and duration was evaluated through a questionnaire response. These are only estimates and may include a considerable degree of inaccuracy. Consumption may vary over time. We also don’t know how these eggs were prepared (boiled, fried in oil, scrambled in butter, etc).
This wasn’t a trial, and so people are choosing the number of egg yolks they eat. People who ate more egg yolks may differ in other health and lifestyle factors from people who ate less, and this may account for their different artery build-up. For example, as the researchers rightly acknowledge, they did not thoroughly assess other dietary factors, exercise or waist circumference. It is possible that higher egg yolk consumption could be associated with less exercise and higher overall saturated fat intake – both well known risk factors for heart disease. The small changes in fatty build-up in the arteries seen with higher egg yolk consumption could have been accounted for by these other factors.
None of the participants in this study were reported to be suffering from heart disease and the heart arteries were not examined.
We do not know how or whether the extent of fatty build-up in the neck arteries was associated with build-up in the heart arteries.
This is a relatively small, select sample of people attending a vascular clinic in Canada, and further quality studies would be needed to better assess the question.



This study perhaps best supports the notion of all things in moderation. Eggs are a good source of protein in addition to other vitamins and minerals and most experts advise that they can form part of a healthy, balanced diet.

If you have been told you have pre-existing risk factors for heart disease, or other CVDs, your GP will be able to provide more detailed advice about a recommended diet.

utR!
08-17-2012, 03:21 PM
With this article + the name of the topic I just wanted stimulate or wake up some open discussion of eating eggs. For me I do enjoy that you may learn something new because of the wide way of viewing the theme of quite usual food like egg. It is valuable for those who do have clear risk (genetic too) to perhaps avoid too many eggs. It is cheap and easy food and in some countries folk eat them nearly daily.

Yes the yolk is for growing chicken same as milk for calves but I think nearly all kind of food is also for us, everyone can or want to be vegetarist but eating all sort of food. Sience is needed to get more knowledge of nutrition and how it affects in our wellbeing.

tuuli

_dementia
08-17-2012, 04:32 PM
I would disregard anything reported by the daily mail. The egg yolk in a boiled/fried egg is the best part.

basque
08-17-2012, 09:09 PM
I have 2 free range boiled eggs on toast for breakfast every morning and have done so for years my HDL/LDL cholesterol ratio is excellent (from recent blood test).

Its the best way to start the day and better then sugar laden cereals.

basque:)

MikeWhalen
08-17-2012, 09:29 PM
you guys are making me hungry...3 fried eggs, sunny side up, with some(lots) bacon and toast for breakfast tommorow for sure! love the egg yolk on toast

Mike

ilmari
08-18-2012, 07:27 AM
I have to laugh, I really don't like eggs at all.

I did eat my sisters yolk with toast when I was a small child and now I do eat my niece's deviled eggs, but only hers or mine, if I make them for a party.

utR!
08-18-2012, 07:37 AM
I have to laugh, I really don't like eggs at all.

I did eat my sisters yolk with toast when I was a small child and now I do eat my niece's deviled eggs, but only hers or mine, if I make them for a party.

Life is not so simple and maybe it was good for you when you were growing and "builiding" muscles :)

tuuli

utR!
08-18-2012, 07:40 AM
you guys are making me hungry...3 fried eggs, sunny side up, with some(lots) bacon and toast for breakfast tommorow for sure! love the egg yolk on toast

Mike

I like toast bread with fried eggs and some peas in tomato sauce. You do not need much, sometimes bacon when it is well done crispy. Yes I feel hungry too but there are no eggs at home so.

utR!
08-18-2012, 07:44 AM
I have 2 free range boiled eggs on toast for breakfast every morning and have done so for years my HDL/LDL cholesterol ratio is excellent (from recent blood test).

Its the best way to start the day and better then sugar laden cereals.

basque:)

You are in good condition working hard every day and using the rest extra calories in gym. I have a light work. And your values of lab. are ok :)

Verj-nu-armu
08-18-2012, 10:50 AM
Eggs are definitely the way to go if you're into strength & power. But perhaps in the long run there might be some iffies, but at least for those who like it short & merry: Eat your eggs!

Ann Turner
08-18-2012, 01:24 PM
A number of years ago I participated in a very well-designed double-blind cross-over study at Stanford about the effect of eggs on serum cholesterol. They provided all meals: one month the menus were prepared using 1, 2 or 4 real eggs per day and the other month the identical menus used 1, 2 or 4 egg substitutes. There was one month in between where I consumed my usual diet. I turned out to be in the 4 egg group, and my own serum cholesterol was LOWER after the month on real eggs. Other participants had an increase, but the overall average showed no significant difference between the months with and without real eggs. There may be genetic differences in the way people handle dietary cholesterol.

AJL
08-18-2012, 04:20 PM
Great to see you here, Ann.

Very interesting: I also recall a study where those who ate eggs at breakfast tended to eat fewer calories later in the day.

utR!
08-18-2012, 05:08 PM
A number of years ago I participated in a very well-designed double-blind cross-over study at Stanford about the effect of eggs on serum cholesterol. They provided all meals: one month the menus were prepared using 1, 2 or 4 real eggs per day and the other month the identical menus used 1, 2 or 4 egg substitutes. There was one month in between where I consumed my usual diet. I turned out to be in the 4 egg group, and my own serum cholesterol was LOWER after the month on real eggs. Other participants had an increase, but the overall average showed no significant difference between the months with and without real eggs. There may be genetic differences in the way people handle dietary cholesterol.

Thanks for sharing! It is inspiring to read about that kind of study. How manyt participants there were? And what about the results and was there any difference between men and women or did the age affect anyhow?

tuuli

Ann Turner
08-18-2012, 11:05 PM
Thanks for sharing! It is inspiring to read about that kind of study. How manyt participants there were? And what about the results and was there any difference between men and women or did the age affect anyhow?

tuuli
Here's the abstract (full text is behind a paywall)

http://www.metabolismjournal.com/article/S0026-0495%2801%2995422-8/abstract

MikeWhalen
08-19-2012, 05:10 AM
for those that care, my fried eggs, sunny side up. with toast and bacon, was delish!
and I didnt die
yet

M

utR!
08-19-2012, 05:48 AM
Here's the abstract (full text is behind a paywall)

http://www.metabolismjournal.com/article/S0026-0495%2801%2995422-8/abstract

Abstract gave enough information and it's necessary to have wider perspective of several studies relating to our health, genetic backround and eating habits. I just wonder is there any research about genetic weakness, can it be in some mutations we have or not or is it also something to do with how much saturated fat we intake?

tuuli

utR!
08-19-2012, 05:53 AM
for those that care, my fried eggs, sunny side up. with toast and bacon, was delish!
and I didnt die
yet

M

Sounds nice 'sunny side up', we do not say like that. Also the color of it (other food too) makes eating more appealing.

tuuli

:)

DMXX
08-28-2012, 08:05 AM
Relevant results from that recent bloodtest:

Total cholesterol 3.89 (3.5-6.5 mmol/L, ideal = <5.2)
HDL 1.81 (0.8-1.8 mmol/L)
LDL 1.6 (0.7-2.1 mmol/L)

My "good cholesterol" has always been slightly higher than average. I suppose that's a genetic feature. The LDL's slightly higher than it once was, but I'd notch that up to my recent summer vacation burger binge than my 4-a-day egg consumption.

Despite that, my total cholesterol's well within the ideal, so for me, eating several egg yolks a day for 6 months has had practically no effect on my blood results since last year, even if other food habits likely explained the slight LDL bump.

utR!
08-28-2012, 04:57 PM
You Humata have good labs. And it seems eating eggs does not change the values of cholesterol.

I used to go yearly to our own doctor but this year I have not, perhaps I should. It should be like taking a car to a service :\

tuuli

utR!
01-31-2013, 04:33 PM
Yes tuuli, eggs have much energy. Every person should have to eat at least one egg in a day even in summer because it has much protein and energy which keep a man healthy and active all the day... it also increase body stamina.

Yes Jamie it contains a lot of good stuff for us and it is tasty too. But according to my last test my ba cholesterol LDL is not very good do not know is it just because of my genetics or because of the food. More fibre and veg :)

Need to boil some eggs for the sandwiches and also make a cake so again eggs.

tuuli

DMXX
02-01-2013, 02:09 AM
I had a rather odd health presentation just over two months ago that was caused by high cholesterol. I've practically cut red meat out of my diet but have kept to eating at least 15 eggs a week. The health complaint's gone away, so the fat content of eggs wasn't the problem.

Completely anecdotal, but supports my earlier health results. Eggs aren't a danger food for me!

utR!
02-01-2013, 05:06 PM
I had a rather odd health presentation just over two months ago that was caused by high cholesterol. I've practically cut red meat out of my diet but have kept to eating at least 15 eggs a week. The health complaint's gone away, so the fat content of eggs wasn't the problem.

Completely anecdotal, but supports my earlier health results. Eggs aren't a danger food for me!

Hi DMXX!

That is a good observation that it is red meat which caused the higher cholesterol. Was your LDL also higher than earlier?

I do eat meat not creasy. I have eaten red meat because it is healty in some extence knowing in the same time white meat would be even healthier.

My youngest sister eats nearly vegetary diet and her cholesterol dropped dramatically so it is quite surely linked to meat. I just wonder why meat raise the value of cholesterol?

tuuli

Azvarohi
02-04-2013, 04:25 AM
Red meat can raise cholesterol levels for some people who apparently are more sensitive. Looking back at studies retrospectively, high intake of vegetables and physical activity seem to be counterproductive to bad cholesterol levels despite high intake of saturated fat (which have long been argued as the reason for high cholesterol levels). A Swedish study published about two years ago was the result of 12 years prospective work on mens diet and cardiovascular diseases. A high intake of vegetables, fruits and dairy fat had a positive correlation, at the same time the same amount of vegetables and fruits but not dairy fat did not have the same positive correlation. What was interesting is that half of the participants were farmers, a physical demanding job.

The psychological aspect can not be underestimated also, you need to have your hormones in balance as much as you have your diet and physical activity in balance.

utR!
02-04-2013, 03:54 PM
Red meat can raise cholesterol levels for some people who apparently are more sensitive. Looking back at studies retrospectively, high intake of vegetables and physical activity seem to be counterproductive to bad cholesterol levels despite high intake of saturated fat (which have long been argued as the reason for high cholesterol levels). A Swedish study published about two years ago was the result of 12 years prospective work on mens diet and cardiovascular diseases. A high intake of vegetables, fruits and dairy fat had a positive correlation, at the same time the same amount of vegetables and fruits but not dairy fat did not have the same positive correlation. What was interesting is that half of the participants were farmers, a physical demanding job.

The psychological aspect can not be underestimated also, you need to have your hormones in balance as much as you have your diet and physical activity in balance.

That is something. But it also need physical work like old time when there were not so many machines. Now office work or light work is increasing and also unwillingness to excercise after long tiring workday. Balance with your diet and activity is the key word not to forget as you mentioned the genetic sensitivity.

utR!

MikeWhalen
02-05-2013, 12:40 PM
for what it is worth...I have rediscovered the deliciousness of cheese omelettes (3 egg), and having been having one a week as a supper-my concession to healthiness is to buy the omega 3 eggs-sometimes a bit of bacon and onion in it as well....very yummy

Mike

utR!
02-05-2013, 06:40 PM
for what it is worth...I have rediscovered the deliciousness of cheese omelettes (3 egg), and having been having one a week as a supper-my concession to healthiness is to buy the omega 3 eggs-sometimes a bit of bacon and onion in it as well....very yummy

Mike

When I do omelette every time I do put top of it cheese. It gives such a tasty tasty sensation and mushrooms are top of my favorite with onion, carlic, and some green dried nettle and parsley.

I had a photo of my pizza-look like omelett somewhere but I can not find it just right in this moment.

utR!

basque
02-05-2013, 07:40 PM
When I do omelette every time I do put top of it cheese. It gives such a tasty tasty sensation and mushrooms are top of my favorite with onion, carlic, and some green dried nettle and parsley.

I had a photo of my pizza-look like omelett somewhere but I can not find it just right in this moment.

utR!

Cheese omelette with baked potato and salad all on the same plate. And some crusty bread

Very yummy :hungry:

basque :rolleyes:

utR!
02-19-2013, 04:30 PM
Well i am a big fan of egg but i have always thrown, out the yolk and only consumed, the white-part. Many people who have viewed me prepare morning meal think i am being wasteful but it doesn't, issue to me.

Hi Almondd!

Yes we have differences in individuals eating habits.

I know a person who can not eat fried eggs because he was forced (I think he refused not to and was punished) to eat fried egg in daycare home when he was 5. That refusal has continued untill adulthood.

utr!

utR!
03-08-2013, 05:21 PM
There are already given different suggestion by you all. According to me It is no doubt that it is more healthy. Actually yolk is made by protein and you know very well that protein is how important for us. But i have allergic from eggs. I do not why but if i eat yolk, It is really allergic. Any idea about that???

Hi!

I found this article if it does help anyhow to your questions. Yes it's not nice when you have to avoid egg because it is used a lot in different kind of foods and so on.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2868273/

utR!

utR!
03-08-2013, 05:55 PM
Hi abner!

More reading if you have time may give some new idea:

http://www.mcri.edu.au/media/147737/all12015.pdf

utR1

utR!
03-23-2013, 04:59 AM
Yes you can give egg yolks to cats and dogs. Some cats like it as Saara did. But not to give the white only yolk. The yolk is good for them as it is for a growing chicken.

ilmari
03-24-2013, 06:16 AM
Both my Saara and my Boo ate egg yolks. If I gave them whole boiled eggs, they only ate the yolk and the white part ended up everywhere but in their stomach. :tsk: I miss them.

utR!
03-24-2013, 07:40 AM
Both my Saara and my Boo ate egg yolks. If I gave them whole boiled eggs, they only ate the yolk and the white part ended up everywhere but in their stomach. :tsk: I miss them.

Hi Ilmari!

Maybe they just naturally avoided eat it. Saara liked it and ate fast it but Leevi (he is lonely without Saara) does not care much of it.

I do understand you miss them a lot. You do not have a new dog in mind any more?

:)

ilmari
03-25-2013, 10:11 PM
Travel plans must happen before I can get any more fur babies.

utR!
03-26-2013, 05:44 AM
Travel plans must happen before I can get any more fur babies.

What to say, cool...

:thumb:

basque
04-19-2013, 09:37 PM
At Last the truth about eggs :hungry:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2307742/Ignore-finger-waggers-You-SHOULD-work-egg.html

basque :rolleyes:

utR!
04-20-2013, 04:16 PM
At Last the truth about eggs :hungry:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2307742/Ignore-finger-waggers-You-SHOULD-work-egg.html

basque :rolleyes:

Hi basque!

This article gave a lot for thinking about cholesterol too. I have wondered what kind of food does rise the level of it? Or is it just in genes!? For me I have kept egg yolk a very very bad source of cholestrol and get higer LDL.

By the way I bought eggs today which were cheap. B)

utr!

basque
04-20-2013, 07:39 PM
Hi basque!

This article gave a lot for thinking about cholesterol too. I have wondered what kind of food does rise the level of it? Or is it just in genes!? For me I have kept egg yolk a very very bad source of cholestrol and get higer LDL.

By the way I bought eggs today which were cheap. B)

utr!

utr

Sometimes no matter how good your diet and lifestyle is, your cholesterol can still be high so it will most likely be genetic. I posted a good article about heart disease and cholesterol in the Health and Fitness section.

basque :rolleyes:

utR!
06-02-2013, 06:09 PM
I read that yolk has some benefit for nails which are fragile and brittle. Because nails need B7, iron and zinc. The yolk is a good source of those.

I have not very strong nails for as long as I can remember. Perhaps it is written in my DNA too? :)

utR!

utR!
09-08-2013, 04:59 AM
Hi!

Which SNP's are showing the risk of cholesterol? I can not rememeber is this discussed here earlier?

utR!

basque
09-08-2013, 08:37 PM
Hi!

Which SNP's are showing the risk of cholesterol? I can not rememeber is this discussed here earlier?

utR!

Hello utR :wave: I have typical results for HDL (good) Cholesterol at 23&me

At rs964184 I have CC European

At rs3764261 I have CC European & Asian

At rs2271293 I have GG European

At rs17145738 I have CC European & Asian

Hope this helps

basque :rolleyes:

Clinton P
09-09-2013, 12:12 PM
Hi!

Which SNP's are showing the risk of cholesterol? I can not rememeber is this discussed here earlier?

utR!

There is also LDL ("Bad") Cholesterol. Levels are predicted with the following markers:

Marker rs4299376
Marker rs6511720
Marker rs646776
Marker rs1367117

Lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet, and exercise influence LDL levels, as do many genetic factors.

Clinton P

utR!
09-09-2013, 03:28 PM
Hello utR :wave: I have typical results for HDL (good) Cholesterol at 23&me

At rs964184 I have CC European

At rs3764261 I have CC European & Asian

At rs2271293 I have GG European

At rs17145738 I have CC European & Asian

Hope this helps

basque :rolleyes:

Terve basque!

Yes it did. I found only one result the first one which is CC, so I think I may have quite same as yours.

Have you any idea how the results differs from European, Asian, African and so results. Who has best results if I can say so?

t: utR!

utR!
09-09-2013, 03:34 PM
There is also LDL ("Bad") Cholesterol. Levels are predicted with the following markers:

Marker rs4299376
Marker rs6511720
Marker rs646776
Marker rs1367117

Lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet, and exercise influence LDL levels, as do many genetic factors.

Clinton P

Thanks Clinton P. I have a big genetic heritance. Plus other things harming (no smoking). Vegetarian diet does good for a level of LDL but for me it almost impossible eat so much veg. just berries perhaps over the recommended amount.

utR!

basque
09-09-2013, 09:52 PM
Terve basque!

Yes it did. I found only one result the first one which is CC, so I think I may have quite same as yours.

Have you any idea how the results differs from European, Asian, African and so results. Who has best results if I can say so?

t: utR!

utR My HDL results were for European and Asian population`s and were typical which I presume meant they were ok. I have just had my cholesterol tested the results came back very good which is mostly down to my lifestyle and some good genes my sister has good cholesterol and so does my dad, my mother refuses to get her`s tested.

Thanks Clinton P for some strange reason I did not see the LDL markers at 23&me.

My results for LDL on 23&me were also typical for European.

rs 4299376 I have GT
rs 6511720 I have GG
rs 646776 I have TT
rs 1367117 I have AA

basque :rolleyes:

Clinton P
02-02-2015, 04:10 PM
"The method could save the biotech industry a lot of headache, and a lot of money."

Click here (http://www.newsweek.com/scientists-figure-out-how-unboil-egg-chemistry-301791http://) to read more about this story.

Clinton P

utR!
02-28-2015, 07:00 PM
I think I read lately that few eggs are not bad. I think everybody have individual amount of cholesterol and if it is high maybe it is worth to reduce the products which may increase the total and the bad one. Mine has rised since 2007.

utR!

jayphilip
04-13-2015, 07:43 AM
Exactly. And really, egg yolks are the least of most individuals health worries. Don't leave them just take 1-2 daily according to your daily health and fitness routine.

gravetti
04-13-2015, 09:53 AM
Egg yolks actually contain all the healthy, fatty acids that are contained within the egg. It is a nucleus of wholesome goodness that supplied our ancestors with their sustenance since before they were upright. When you strip away the egg yolk and eat only the white, you're completely missing out on the benefits of those fatty acids like the Omega-3 fats.

Egg yolks also contain over 80% of the overall vitamins and minerals that can be found within the egg as a whole. The facts point to the conclusion that the egg should be consumed without division.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/whats-the-big-deal-with-egg-yolks-anyway.html

utR!
04-13-2015, 12:48 PM
Egg yolks actually contain all the healthy, fatty acids that are contained within the egg. It is a nucleus of wholesome goodness that supplied our ancestors with their sustenance since before they were upright. When you strip away the egg yolk and eat only the white, you're completely missing out on the benefits of those fatty acids like the Omega-3 fats.

Egg yolks also contain over 80% of the overall vitamins and minerals that can be found within the egg as a whole. The facts point to the conclusion that the egg should be consumed without division.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/whats-the-big-deal-with-egg-yolks-anyway.html

That is great article to be read. Egg is full packet of good nutrition and also keep you full.

utR!

utR!
01-09-2017, 02:13 PM
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2017/01/04/ajcn.116.146753.abstract?sid=1c4d29f5-6bd9-41ce-81ff-40e63d6f0520

Something positive to read about the eggs.

Best utR!

Nibelung
10-24-2017, 02:25 AM
As far as I understand it, professional doctors & scientists too will make up just about anything on the fly... appease their ethnic sensitivities and they'll get nicer... so you really don't ever know what you're getting.

Eggs and the cholesterol matter? I would assume it depends on how much/far you're considered pretty much over (as a Socialite).

onemiguel1987
03-03-2018, 06:07 AM
Two large whole eggs (100 grams) contain about 422 mg of cholesterol.

C J Wyatt III
03-03-2018, 06:57 AM
Two large whole eggs (100 grams) contain about 422 mg of cholesterol.

The body creates cholesterol, so what you take in may not really matter.

In the past half year, I have dropped an eighth of my body weight and my lepids are now normal. I've eliminated carbs almost completely (I'll eat the bun if I get a fast food cheeseburger and it is hard to give up the breading on fried chicken), but I usually eat one, two or three whole eggs a day. Oh yes, I do not exercise though I am moderately active daily.

Like most other fields, experts on nutrition have been pushing some bad information. My deceased physician father used to tell me "if you want to lose weight, give up bread". For a bread lover that was painful, but it seems to work tor me.

Jack Wyatt

p.s. I find MacDonalds' value menu triple cheeseburger has the best fat to carb ratio.

spruithean
03-03-2018, 02:08 PM
it seems to me, that when you take all the scientific studies together, they pretty much say that eating anything is bad and will kill you, so therefore, to be healthy, you should stop eating all together

Agreed! :D

Interesting read. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160211083044.htm)

C J Wyatt III
03-03-2018, 02:12 PM
I awoke to this interesting and relevant slideshow on the internet:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/nutrition/15-things-that-happen-to-your-body-when-you-eat-eggs/ss-AAtmMai?ocid=spartandhp#image=1

Jack

Stranger
08-13-2018, 11:08 PM
I don't know. Whatever gives me protein.

Jeremy23
02-18-2021, 06:43 AM
The best way to minimize these risks is to eat less when you get old or do exercises to keep your body healthy. The high cholesterol content of yolk might be the reason for such high blood cholesterol level therefore increasing the risk of heart diseases.

ceribell
03-22-2021, 11:45 PM
I think that the yolk is the most nutritious and delicious part of an egg.
The white part doesn’t offer much in terms of either taste or nutrition.

C J Wyatt III
03-23-2021, 08:43 AM
I think that the yolk is the most nutritious and delicious part of an egg.
The white part doesn’t offer much in terms of either taste or nutrition.

Actually more than half of the protein in the egg comes from the white. The white does have some useful traits in cooking and baking, but it can also be the cause of some very severe allergic reactions for small percent for the population. If you are allergic to eggs like my father was, you have to be careful about the ingredients of everything. Just a touch could put my father into anaphylactic shock, but with a watchful wife, he managed to live to eighty-five. The reaction came on very quickly so he could tell if he had gotten egg before consuming much, like the time in Germany when he was given a glass of orange juice with a raw egg in it.

ceribell
03-23-2021, 08:08 PM
Actually more than half of the protein in the egg comes from the white. The white does have some useful traits in cooking and baking, but it can also be the cause of some very severe allergic reactions for small percent for the population. If you are allergic to eggs like my father was, you have to be careful about the ingredients of everything. Just a touch could put my father into anaphylactic shock, but with a watchful wife, he managed to live to eighty-five. The reaction came on very quickly so he could tell if he had gotten egg before consuming much, like the time in Germany when he was given a glass of orange juice with a raw egg in it.

Interesting, I always assumed that egg whites were not very nutritious because they are so low in calories. I think of them as tasteless diet food. Although lemon meringue pie has to be one of my all time favorite desserts.
My son in law made breakfast for our family last weekend and he did an excellent job cooking my eggs just the way that I like them, over medium. He used a cast iron skillet and fried them up in a little olive oil, the edges got nice and crispy but not overly cooked. I topped them off with a little course sea salt and fresh ground black pepper...delicious!

I remember years ago people would often add a raw egg to tomato juice and drink it straight down for a hangover remedy or added one to orange juice and make a healthy power drink. It sounds pretty disgusting to me, thick and slimy not to mention the risk of salmonella.
Your poor grandpa, being unaware that there was raw egg in his orange juice. I am imagining the look on his face after that first eggy gulp!