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Aldric
04-24-2018, 06:45 PM
I was curious about other's peoples migration associations on this forum, so I thought it would be interesting to make a thread about it and see how accurate it is for each individual.

Thanks! :P

https://s9.postimg.cc/ada9fzcgf/Untitled.jpg

mwauthy
04-24-2018, 06:54 PM
“Saint Lawrence River French Settlers.” I’m 50% French Canadian and my mom is 100% French Canadian. Unfortunately, Ancestry does not designate any difference between us. I wonder what the genetic or paper trail threshold is to qualify for a migration community?

Dewsloth
04-24-2018, 07:05 PM
Ancestry did a good job for my mother's half of my DNA:



1825–1850
Syrian-Lebanese
Life in the Levant
Syria was ruled by a Sunni Muslim amir who paid tribute to the Ottoman Emperor but governed the province independently. The next step down in the power structure were noble families, both Christian and Muslim. Below them were the farmers, tradesmen, and merchants (and their families) that made up the bulk of the population—many of them Maronite Christians or Druze, as well as other Christian and Muslim sects. Barter and trade were common means of exchange. Farmers and herders tended grain, livestock, orchards of fruit and olive trees, and vineyards, using the grapes to make both wine and a favorite local liquor called arak that is flavored with anise.


1850–1900
Syrian-Lebanese
Silken Threads
A short civil war between the Druze and Christians left thousands of Christians dead and the Christian quarter of Damascus burned. Foreign Christian missionaries opened schools from Beirut to Aleppo, providing access to Western thought. In Mount Lebanon, people abandoned subsistence farming to plant mulberry trees and raise silkworms for the French market. Young women found work in silk spinning factories, and while people spoke Arabic, French became the language of prestige. However, the switch to silk left the economy vulnerable to setbacks like cheap silk from Japan and disease that struck silkworms and trees.


1900–1925
Syrian-Lebanese
Leaving Lebanon
With population on the rise and silk demand declining, Syrians began to look elsewhere to make their fortune. Some left because of religious persecution (more than 90% of emigrants were Christian), political tension, or fear of forced military service. But tales of Amerka, cash sent home, labor agents called simsars, and poverty motivated most. In America they often started out as peddlers, selling clothes or housewares from Massachusetts to West Virginia. Settlers from Jdeidet Marjeyoun landed in Oklahoma, where earlier immigrants had come to take advantage of business and farming opportunities after the state’s land runs and could help newcomers get their start. Many early migrants were young men who planned to make money and return home.


1925–1950
Syrian-Lebanese
Bringing the Mediterranean to America
In Lebanon, people were moving from rural to urban areas, and a second wave of immigration brought more women to America. Detroit’s booming economy attracted so many Syrian-Lebanese, one resident recalled seeing “a small family Syrian grocery on practically every corner.” Manhattan’s Syrian neighborhood was described as “a buzzing…Middle Eastern Bazaar”; Danbury, Connecticut, had its “Little Lebanon” and Toledo, Ohio, had its “Little Syria.” Syrians went from being peddlers to store owners, set up aid societies, gathered in cafes to drink strong Turkish coffee and smoke tobacco from argilehs (water pipes), and celebrated their food, music, and culture in mahrajan (festivals).

^^This is, indeed, where the family is from: my mother and both of her parents (and one of her grandparents) were born in Toledo before 1950.
That whole side came over to the U.S. between 1850 and 1910.

Aldric
04-24-2018, 07:35 PM
“Saint Lawrence River French Settlers.” I’m 50% French Canadian and my mom is 100% French Canadian. Unfortunately, Ancestry does not designate any difference between us. I wonder what the genetic or paper trail threshold is to qualify for a migration community?

Probably through your genetic relatedness with other people that has a consistent genetic signature with a certain geographical area.

msmarjoribanks
04-25-2018, 12:58 AM
Mine are super broad. Accurate enough, but eh.

Ohio River Valley, Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Settlers

Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana Settlers

kujira692
04-25-2018, 02:04 AM
My mom gets "Southeastern New York Settlers" which does account for about 1/8th of her ancestry.

My dad gets "Scotland" (he has no significant Scottish ancestry, but does have a LOT of Nova Scotian ancestry which is included in the category, and he has Irish ancestors), "Newfoundland English Settlers" (about 1/16th his ancestry), "Saint Lawrence River French Settlers" (about 1/8th), "Nova Scotia and Massachusetts Coast Settlers (about 1/2), and "New York Settlers" (about 1/4).

kostoffj
04-25-2018, 02:10 AM
https://i.imgur.com/uk1vpXl.png

For some odd reason though, Ancestry started counting a bunch of non-German ancestors in with the Germans for this GC. Not sure what the logic at work there was.

The other thing about it, they seem to count other waves into it. The great German settlement of the American midwest is mostly (not entirely) due to the big wave of settlers fleeing the revolutions of 1848 and following years until the late 19th century. But the timeline starts at 1700 and they talk about Pennsylvania, North Carolina, etc. - that's a different bunch of people, much earlier, different reasons, smaller numbers and much more specific religious groups. They could probably clean that up.

Spencer00
04-25-2018, 02:15 AM
3 migrations: North Alabama Settlers, Northern Arkansas & Middle Tennessee Settlers, and Tennessee & Southern States Settlers.

Dewsloth
04-25-2018, 03:58 PM
Mine are super broad. Accurate enough, but eh.

Ohio River Valley, Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Settlers

Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana Settlers

While Ancestry figured out my mom's half of my DNA quite well, they just sort of shrugged at the rest (my dad's).
I guess in totality my half of Dad's DNA is too generic to conclude anything else about circles or migration patterns, although roughly half of his ancestors arrived in North America, from Great Britain, in the 17th century, and include original New England colonists, Virginia>Kentucky>Indiana frontier folks (my 6th great grandmother was born in Zurich in 1698 and died in an indian raid in Kentucky in 1782), and "PA Dutch," too:

Europe South 47% (part of this is Mom's)
Europe West 19%
Middle East 14% (probably all Mom's)
(Syrian-Lebanese)
Caucasus 8%
"Low Confidence Regions"
Ireland/Scotland/Wales 4%
Great Britain 3%
European Jewish 3%
Asia South 1%
Scandinavia 1%

I bought Dad a kit in this recent sale, maybe they will give more specific results when that is complete.

jshook
04-25-2018, 04:44 PM
This is a neat thread. Thanks for starting it. Mine was extremely accurate, as it says it includes "North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains Settlers" and "Western North Carolina & Northeastern Georgia Settlers." My family is from Appalachian Georgia literally on the North Carolina border.

https://s17.postimg.cc/rogychbb3/blueridge.jpg

msmarjoribanks
04-25-2018, 05:59 PM
https://i.imgur.com/uk1vpXl.png

For some odd reason though, Ancestry started counting a bunch of non-German ancestors in with the Germans for this GC. Not sure what the logic at work there was.

The other thing about it, they seem to count other waves into it. The great German settlement of the American midwest is mostly (not entirely) due to the big wave of settlers fleeing the revolutions of 1848 and following years until the late 19th century. But the timeline starts at 1700 and they talk about Pennsylvania, North Carolina, etc. - that's a different bunch of people, much earlier, different reasons, smaller numbers and much more specific religious groups. They could probably clean that up.

These are (or should be) treated as separate migrations.

I'm in Chicago and done some neighborhood research, and there you see the 1848 German migration have an enormous influence, and obviously in other parts of the midwest like Cinci, Wisconsin, St Louis, etc. I'd separate that out from the 1700s German migration which was also really significant and went to PA, MD, western VA, OH, and so on, and then west in the same way other settlers in those areas did. I've got some of that ancestry in my PA/OH/IN and Ohio River Valley migrations, although apparently not enough to get Germany/midwest called out as a separate category for me.

euromutt
04-25-2018, 06:19 PM
This was spot on for me. 50% of my mom's side came through/from French Canada.

22786

selectivememri
04-26-2018, 09:15 PM
is this a new feature that people are getting with updated ethnicity estimates? or has it been around since the introduction of genetic communities?

msmarjoribanks
04-27-2018, 03:08 PM
It's a rebranding of genetic communities, or at least some of them. Mine were both formerly communities.

MischievousRaven
05-06-2018, 01:08 PM
23007

Here are the genetic communities for my dad (top), mom (middle) and me (bottom), listed as "Germany and the Midwestern United States" currently for all of us, despite the slight differences in size between my dad's associated areas (marked with dotted lines) and mine and my mothers'.

My father has some ancestry from areas of Hessia and Bavaria, but the majority of his ancestry is predominantly Dutch.

My mother's side is pretty much entirely Saxon Lutheran Germans that immigrated in the early 1800s to the midwest. They came exclusively from northern Germany.

geebee
05-06-2018, 06:00 PM
23014


The four migrations shown for me all make sense, given what I know of my ancestry.

My father's family have all lived in PA since the colonial period, so it's expected that I'd be in "Pennsylvania Settlers" (which used to include the word "Colonial"). Before that, his ancestors were from Germany, Scotland, and Ireland -- a pretty typical mix for people from his area.

Likewise, since PA is a Mid-Atlantic state (despite technically not having an Atlantic coast, thanks to New Jersey), it's also not surprising to see "Mid-Atlantic States Settlers". And obviously, "Pennsylvania, Ohio, & Indiana Settlers" already overlaps with "Pennsylvania Settlers". (Though, I don't believe I necessarily had in ancestors who were in Ohio or Indiana -- just lots of cousins with ancestry from there.)

"Eastern Kentucky & Northeast Tennessee Settlers" would have been a surprise before I learned who my maternal grandfather's parents really were, and where they came from. Their ancestors settled in Virginia and elsewhere in the colonies, then moved on in Kentucky and Tennessee. His ties there are actually pretty strong, though my grandfather himself was probably born in Arkansas.

What's a bit more of a puzzle to me is a migration I don't have. I don't have one connected to my maternal grandmother's ancestry, which includes a deep connection to the Gulf coast of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. When I say "deep", one of her ancestors was part of d'Iberville's 1698 expedition to find the mouth of the Mississippi River. This ancestor returned to settle near the coast not long after 1700.

Now, in some ways this ancestry -- while deep -- is not all that wide. Three of my grandmother's grandparents were immigrants: both grandfathers from the Spanish island of Minorca, and one grandmother from Alsace-Lorraine. But I'm connected to at least nine DNA Circles that are related to that remaining grandmother, and I have numerous relatives as close as half 2nd cousins in my DNA relatives list who are part of this connection.

In fact, it frustrates me that Ancestry doesn't allow you to see any of the "migrations" that some of your cousins might belong to, but you do not. I suspect I'd see a lot of these cousins would be assigned to the region in question -- as I believe I probably should be, but for some reason am not.

Avrowolf
05-07-2018, 06:40 AM
Apparently I got "St. Lawrence River: French Settlers", with Montreal and Detroit French settlers being specific places (apparently I can't upload pics yet... Oh well)

jshook
05-08-2018, 03:35 PM
Thought I'd also add my husband's migration to this thread. His father's family is from northern Louisiana and Alabama, so this seems to correspond nicely as well.

https://s7.postimg.cc/8ym0il5bv/Screenshot_72.png

msmarjoribanks
05-08-2018, 05:31 PM
23014


The four migrations shown for me all make sense, given what I know of my ancestry.

My father's family have all lived in PA since the colonial period, so it's expected that I'd be in "Pennsylvania Settlers" (which used to include the word "Colonial"). Before that, his ancestors were from Germany, Scotland, and Ireland -- a pretty typical mix for people from his area.

Likewise, since PA is a Mid-Atlantic state (despite technically not having an Atlantic coast, thanks to New Jersey), it's also not surprising to see "Mid-Atlantic States Settlers". And obviously, "Pennsylvania, Ohio, & Indiana Settlers" already overlaps with "Pennsylvania Settlers". (Though, I don't believe I necessarily had in ancestors who were in Ohio or Indiana -- just lots of cousins with ancestry from there.)

"Eastern Kentucky & Northeast Tennessee Settlers" would have been a surprise before I learned who my maternal grandfather's parents really were, and where they came from. Their ancestors settled in Virginia and elsewhere in the colonies, then moved on in Kentucky and Tennessee. His ties there are actually pretty strong, though my grandfather himself was probably born in Arkansas.

What's a bit more of a puzzle to me is a migration I don't have. I don't have one connected to my maternal grandmother's ancestry, which includes a deep connection to the Gulf coast of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. When I say "deep", one of her ancestors was part of d'Iberville's 1698 expedition to find the mouth of the Mississippi River. This ancestor returned to settle near the coast not long after 1700.

Now, in some ways this ancestry -- while deep -- is not all that wide. Three of my grandmother's grandparents were immigrants: both grandfathers from the Spanish island of Minorca, and one grandmother from Alsace-Lorraine. But I'm connected to at least nine DNA Circles that are related to that remaining grandmother, and I have numerous relatives as close as half 2nd cousins in my DNA relatives list who are part of this connection.

In fact, it frustrates me that Ancestry doesn't allow you to see any of the "migrations" that some of your cousins might belong to, but you do not. I suspect I'd see a lot of these cousins would be assigned to the region in question -- as I believe I probably should be, but for some reason am not.

I suspect that the farther back a migration is the more you need to have a pretty high percentage of ancestors from that migration for it to show. You also need to connect to the other ancestry people from that migration, which might be hard if your relatives from that migration have not tested yet. Agree it would be interesting to see the migrations your matches are part of.

geebee
05-10-2018, 10:29 AM
I suspect that the farther back a migration is the more you need to have a pretty high percentage of ancestors from that migration for it to show. You also need to connect to the other ancestry people from that migration, which might be hard if your relatives from that migration have not tested yet. Agree it would be interesting to see the migrations your matches are part of.

You're probably right, although I actually have six or seven 2nd cousins at Ancestry -- or more accurately, half 2nd cousins since we share a great grandmother but not a great grandfather -- on my maternal grandmother's side. But since only one of of the parents of this great grandmother was part of the French Louisiana migration -- or whatever Ancestry actually calls it, maybe southern Louisiana/Mississippi or Mississippi/Alabama -- it is a pretty small fraction for me. A 16th, or thereabouts.

And this 16th includes ancestry from France, Switzerland, Ireland, and indigenous ancestry -- but all of it in the area since the early 1700s. (Obviously, the Native American ancestry would have been present for a long time, but how long in precisely that area I don't know.)

That's why it would be nice if I could find whether any of the 2nd cousins I'm talking about have the migration in question. They might, because unlike me a number of them would get this ancestry from multiple grandparents. In this part of my family, I have a 3rd cousin who is related to me through three of his four grandparents.

Even with the 2nd cousins, they're descended both from our great grandmother and her 1st husband, who was my great grandmother's 2nd cousin. So I'm also distantly related to these 2nd cousins on their great grandfather's side, even though he isn't my great grandfather. I guess he'd be something like my 3rd cousin three times removed. But the important thing is that he would have had similar ancestry to my great grandmother, except for all of his ancestry being from the region (and only half of hers).

Sizzles
05-13-2018, 02:06 PM
Mine says I probably have had relatives in the last 100 or 200 years living in Sicily and north east Italy Croatia Bosnia and herzivenia. My German and Irish relatives immigrated here in the 1700s to western PA, Ohio and WA. They are not mentioned. It's like my Irish and German side doesn't exist.
Yet I have extensive family tree showing otherwise. Very strange.

My ancestry results
36% Europe south
Sicily
26% east europe
N e Italy Croatia Bosnia
Herzegovina
24% great britain
5% Ireland Scotland wales
4% caucasus
2% middle east
1% west europe
1% Scandinavian
1% North africa

Any thoughts what happened to the holsingers, diemer, Mckennas and so on. Irish from limerick, Tyrone County, cork Ireland one from Lincolnshire England. Germans from Wurttemberg baden, Alsace basin area. Well to be fair it does show 5% Irish. Seems skimpy.

On others like gencove and gedmatch my German ancestry is there. Also more Scandinavian. Any thoughts about that? Gedmatch has shows alot of similarities to French Greek Spanish Russian they even have Portuguese and I have no known ancestors.

Archimedes
05-13-2018, 02:25 PM
Mine says I probably have had relatives in the last 100 or 200 years living in Sicily and north east Italy Croatia Bosnia and herzivenia. My German and Irish relatives immigrated here in the 1700s to western PA, Ohio and WA. They are not mentioned. It's like my Irish and German side doesn't exist.
Yet I have extensive family tree showing otherwise. Very strange.

My ancestry results
36% Europe south
Sicily
26% east europe
N e Italy Croatia Bosnia
Herzegovina
24% great britain
5% Ireland Scotland wales
4% caucasus
2% middle east
1% west europe
1% Scandinavian
1% North africa

Any thoughts what happened to the holsingers, diemer, Mckennas and so on. Irish from limerick, Tyrone County, cork Ireland one from Lincolnshire England. Germans from Wurttemberg baden, Alsace basin area. Well to be fair it does show 5% Irish. Seems skimpy.

On others like gencove and gedmatch my German ancestry is there. Also more Scandinavian. Any thoughts about that?

It says you have 30% British/Irish ancestry. I wouldn't be too picky. The British Isles populations have had a lot of admixture, and are almost indistinguishable genetically

Sizzles
05-13-2018, 02:43 PM
Curious would great britian also include German?

Dewsloth
05-14-2018, 05:02 PM
While Ancestry figured out my mom's half of my DNA quite well, they just sort of shrugged at the rest (my dad's).
I guess in totality my half of Dad's DNA is too generic to conclude anything else about circles or migration patterns, although roughly half of his ancestors arrived in North America, from Great Britain, in the 17th century, and include original New England colonists, Virginia>Kentucky>Indiana frontier folks (my 6th great grandmother was born in Zurich in 1698 and died in an indian raid in Kentucky in 1782), and "PA Dutch," too:

Europe South 47% (part of this is Mom's)
Europe West 19%
Middle East 14% (probably all Mom's)
(Syrian-Lebanese)
Caucasus 8%
"Low Confidence Regions"
Ireland/Scotland/Wales 4%
Great Britain 3%
European Jewish 3%
Asia South 1%
Scandinavia 1%

I bought Dad a kit in this recent sale, maybe they will give more specific results when that is complete.

Dad's results are in, and they did include one Migration:


Europe West 55%
Europe South 17%
Ireland/Scotland/Wales 12%
Iberian Peninsula 6%
Scandinavia 5%
"Low Confidence Regions"
European Jewish 2%
Great Britain 2% [I have a lot more confidence in this region, too!]
Finland/Northwest Russia 1%

Migrations
Northeastern States Settlers From your regions: Great Britain; Ireland/Scotland/Wales; Europe West

^^This is accurate.

We've got [I]Mayflower passengers, the founders of a few towns in Connecticut and some of the first English colonists to move into Vermont all in our tree.


Curious would great britian also include German?

There is very little difference between a lot of German and certain areas of the British Isles.
Results are constantly flipflopping for my dad (who is roughly an even split between the two). LivingDNA sees only the British (no German). Others only see his results as mainly continental.
Here, Ancestry relegates his British to a "low confidence region" ;)

msmarjoribanks
05-14-2018, 11:10 PM
Curious would great britian also include German?

Ancestry mixes up English/Scandinavian/German all the time.

What is your rough estimate of your ancestry based on paper research? I'm about 75-80% British Isles (mostly English, but Welsh too, and some Irish and Scottish), and I get about 23% on Ancestry (only 4% Great Britain). Most of the rest is under Scandinavian and Western Europe (28% and 42%). Others who are mostly German or Scandinavian sometimes get that attributed to Great Britain.

Sizzles
05-15-2018, 12:36 AM
Ancestry has me at 24% great britain. My German family tree goes back to 8th or 9th generation. I also can trace my Irish Roots to 6th or 7th. Both settled here in 1700s and early 1800s. Ancestry has me at only 5% Irish Scotland and Wales.I also have a set of ancestors from Lincolnshire England too. And only 1% Western Europe. My German and Irish on my moms side along with Sicilian.

MandiTN1972
06-12-2018, 07:13 PM
I only have one migration which is spot on since both sides of my family have been in the heart of Appalachia for several generations back:
Central Appalachia Settlers
You probably have relatives who were part of this region in the past few hundred years.
Your connection to this region is likely through your ancestry from:
Europe West
Great Britain
Ireland/Scotland/Wales
Places in This Region
Specific places in this region where your family might have lived.
Southwestern West Virginia Settlers
Southeastern Kentucky & Southwestern Virginia Settlers


My son has 3:
Migrations
Central Appalachia Settlers From your regions: Great Britain; Ireland/Scotland/Wales; Europe West
Lower Midwest & Virginia Settlers From your regions: Great Britain; Ireland/Scotland/Wales; Europe West
North Carolina African Americans From your regions: Benin/Togo; Cameroon/Congo; Ivory C

euromutt
06-12-2018, 07:19 PM
I completely forgot to post my mom's migrations when her results came in. She received the Saint Lawrence River French Settlers; my sister and I received it as well and it's exactly where our family comes from. But my mom also received South Carolina Settlers, which based on her tree is completely wrong. Thought it was interesting though.

23904

flower
06-12-2018, 08:15 PM
Northeastern States Settlers and New York Settlers. Very accurate and matches the bulk of my paper trail. My mom's surname branch settled in NC and went to KY & TN territory then AL territory all in one generation. Two generations later they were in Ohio and the third generation went to WNY. I'm happy this wasn't reflected in my migration patterns because I don't identify with southerners. Northeastern States extends into Ohio and over the border into Canada. Definitely all my people and in a weird way solidifies the identity I've always felt. It makes me feel very native to the region. In the drop down menu in my matches I have two extras - Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachuetts Settlers, and New England and Eastern Great Lakes Settlers. Again, spot on. I live in a city in NYS on Lake Ontario. I have several ancestors from RI as well. My mom gets New York Settlers, Northeastern States Settlers, and Saint Lawrence River French Settlers. Her matches also includes Montreal and Detroit Settlers in the drop down menu. Also accurate but I haven't found the French Canadians yet. Her mother's side is a bit of a dead end. Her grandmother and mother immigrated illegally from Canada and lied about their who their fathers were to pass themselves off as citizens. My grandmother was probably 1/4 German Canadian Mennonite, 1/4 French Canadian, 1/4 Irish and Dutch, 1/4 general Northwest European. Some went straight to Canada and some went around the Revolutionary War because they were loyalists and got the hell out of Dodge when war broke out.

LostSlough
06-13-2018, 01:09 AM
Northern England & the Midlands
You probably have relatives who were part of this region in the past few hundred years.

Your connection to this region is likely through your ancestry from:
Great Britain
Ireland/Scotland/Wales
Europe West
Specific places in this region where your family might have lived:
Yorkshire & Pennines
Shared with 461 DNA Matches

My paternal grandfather's father was English from Yorkshire, and his mother was Irish from Tipperary. My maternal grandfather's great-grandparents came from Yorkshire as well. So this makes some sense to me.

I didn't get Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana settlers, though, which was disappointing to me. My mom's ancestry is almost entirely from those regions from about 1700 on, and she got that migration. :( And I feel much closer to her side than my bio-father's, so I am bummed not to also have that.

I'm hoping the shake-up might lead to that being added for me, especially now that my mom is on Ancestry, too. (My sister and I got ours first; Mom just got her results last week.)

I really wish for the migrations/genetic communities they'd take trees into account somehow too. Maybe not wholesale, but if you have a tree in an area and 2nd cousin or closer genetic links to others who have that migration, you get it too, or something like that.

JenneR
06-13-2018, 02:14 AM
I’ve been assigned Lower Midwest and Virginia Settlers, that genetic community is quite large. 23917

PoxVoldius
06-13-2018, 02:37 AM
Not going to mess with screenshots for all of these...

Me:
New England Settlers
Northeastern States Settlers
-- subsection: New England & Eastern Great Lakes Settlers

Mom:
New England Settlers

Dad:
Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium & Luxembourg
-- subsection: Northern Germany
New York Settlers
-- subsection: Southeastern New York Settlers
Northeastern States Settlers
-- subsection: New England & Eastern Great Lakes Settlers

Seems reasonable based on the paper trail I have.

Researcher212
06-18-2018, 07:33 PM
Delete

ValerieAnne
06-20-2018, 06:42 PM
I have two of them, super broad as well, I thought i'd have at least one more though (that included Pennsylvania) and possibly one that included North Carolina as its' where most of my family was from Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania.

I was placed in "Eastern Kentucky & Northeast Tennessee Settlers" and "Ohio Valley, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa Settlers".

Nqp15hhu
06-21-2018, 01:08 PM
Ulster: Derry, Donegal and Ulster East.
Scotland.