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daragon39
04-27-2018, 03:14 AM
Anyone have any good links to information regarding K2a3? I've yet to find much information on it.
Thanks.

msmarjoribanks
04-27-2018, 09:42 PM
I don't think much is known about any of the K haplogroups outside of the typically Ashkenazi ones, which K2a3 is not.

However, based on the article at Eupedia, as well as a bit more that is discussed in my K2b thread, there seems to be a distinction between the K1a, K1b and K2a subclades (so this would include K2a3), which are found among the Neolithic founder haplogroups from the Fertile Crescent, and K1c/K2b, which may be linked to the spread of R1a (Y haplogroup) and are often found in the same areas. K1c/K2b seem to have a later appearance in Europe, and are more likely from the steppes, I think.

That's all with the huge disclaimer that there's likely not enough evidence yet, such as adequate testing, to see what the subgroup patterns are. Most of the K2a3s in the FTDNA project seem to originate from Scandinavia, England, Germany, and the Netherlands, but there aren't enough (and those samples are skewed by where testers come from) such that that's not wildly meaningful.

daragon39
04-28-2018, 01:43 AM
I don't think much is known about any of the K haplogroups outside of the typically Ashkenazi ones, which K2a3 is not.

However, based on the article at Eupedia, as well as a bit more that is discussed in my K2b thread, there seems to be a distinction between the K1a, K1b and K2a subclades (so this would include K2a3), which are found among the Neolithic founder haplogroups from the Fertile Crescent, and K1c/K2b, which may be linked to the spread of R1a (Y haplogroup) and are often found in the same areas. K1c/K2b seem to have a later appearance in Europe, and are more likely from the steppes, I think.

That's all with the huge disclaimer that there's likely not enough evidence yet, such as adequate testing, to see what the subgroup patterns are. Most of the K2a3s in the FTDNA project seem to originate from Scandinavia, England, Germany, and the Netherlands, but there aren't enough (and those samples are skewed by where testers come from) such that that's not wildly meaningful.

Yeah, it's unfortunate that so much focus is put on Jewish DNA that everyone else really don't get much information. But what can you do when most of the DNA testing companies and Genealogy companies are owned by Jewish people?
Thank you for the reply.