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TigerEye
06-05-2018, 01:02 PM
I'm just curious what's the benefit of DNA testing. I did it out of curiosity years ago & have found nothing of real value (no offense).

Lirio100
06-05-2018, 04:06 PM
In my case the Y-DNA line is a very common surname; it's helped mostly to rule out which, odd as it sounds, is actually useful. I've autosomal matches to descendants from that ancestor's family that confirm I had found the right point of origin for him. The mtDNA isn't as useful but what matches I have do suggest that the country of origin is the one I had thought it was. The autosomal is actually the most useful for me.

msmarjoribanks
06-05-2018, 07:33 PM
If you are into family history it can be helpful. Can't tell from the original post if you are.

If I wasn't, it would just be a curiosity thing at best.

RobinBMc
06-05-2018, 08:25 PM
What type of DNA test was it? What company did you test with? How many years ago was it? I think the usefulness of it has grown over the years.

rms2
06-05-2018, 11:47 PM
Dna testing is one of the smartest decisions I ever made and one of the best investments I've ever made, as well. I've learned a lot about my ancestry that I did not know, filled in all sorts of gaps in my pedigree, met all sorts of new cousins, and made a lot of new friends.

It was the door to a whole new world of knowledge and has given me countless hours of enjoyment.

Best hobby ever, and I don't regret a single dime spent on it.

Saetro
06-06-2018, 12:06 AM
Dna testing is one of the smartest decisions I ever made and one of the best investments I've ever made, as well. I've learned a lot about my ancestry that I did not know, filled in all sorts of gaps in my pedigree, met all sorts of new cousins, and made a lot of new friends.

It was the door to a whole new world of knowledge and has given me countless hours of enjoyment.

Best hobby ever, and I don't regret a single dime spent on it.

Ditto.
I have some critical points in my family tree where names are very similar and so are times and locations.
Autosomal DNA matches have enabled me to identify the right ancestor from the alternatives.
Areas that have been rich with documentation have given out just before a whole lot of threads matched up. The DNA matches have shown the connections.
As a bonus it has put me in touch with some wonderful cousins.
With great information on the family, on the locations and on the neighbours.
And I have also found some other wonderful pilgrims/searchers who are also on the journey, although they are not related.

Some areas where breakthroughs were expected have not yet materialised.
Serendipitous findings have come up instead.
One of my mtDNA matches has a rare ancestral name, so I looked up that ancestor and found that her husband is in a surname study that enabled me to link some other people to one of my lines. Via a common ancestor from just before 1500.
Just to illustrate that the DNA on its own brings restricted benefits at best - using it with other resources is nearly always far more rewarding.

And doing the tests has opened an interest in deep history - many modern studies are made possible by ancient DNA information.

WARNING - the unfortunate side effect of this interesting personal stuff is that TV genealogy shows often appear not just formulaic but also dull and lifeless by comparison with one's own findings.

rms2
06-06-2018, 01:26 AM
Right after I left this thread, I went over to my Ancestry account to check things out. Found out about a new match on my Stutts (Stutz) Swiss line who turned out to be a 5th cousin once removed. That led to a 4th cousin once removed (when I checked shared matches) who is an actual Stutts. I sent her a message asking if she knows to what y-dna haplogroup the Stutts males belong. Hopefully she knows and will tell me. That is one thing I really like to do: collect the y-dna haplogroups of ancestors outside my own y-dna line.

I belong to the Leonard Stutts DNA circle at Ancestry, where the confidence level is strong and I have a big bunch of matches. The immigrant ancestor is Ulrich Stutz from Zürich, Switzerland. Susan Stutts, Leonard's daughter, is one of my 3rd great grandmothers on my mother's side.

Piquerobi
06-06-2018, 11:24 AM
There are many benefits. The most important is knowledge. DNA testing allows us to know things we were in the dark just a few years ago. You'll also be able to getting in touch with newly discovered cousins, etc. DNA testing and following related scientific DNA publications, as well as forums such as this one, have been a favourite hobby of mine.

JeniferWilliams
06-06-2018, 12:27 PM
DNA testing is very interesting subject to me because of DNA testing we get to know about our root. This is the really great thing about DNA testing.

RobertCasey
06-06-2018, 03:51 PM
My parents and I were hard core genealogists which has resulted in our publication of nine 600 page family history books. But it just became of chore of adding several thousand new cousins each year - with minimal progress on our brick walls. So I switched to genetic genealogy after my parents passed away and during the last fours, it has provided a lot of fun in retirement and keeps my mind very active. I am one of the project admins for R-L226 and due to extensive YSNP and a large sample size of 680 testers at 67 or more markers. I can not reliably chart around 87 % of these testers that share a common ancestor 1,500 years ago. Of the 78 known branches under L226, around 20 to 25 % of the YSNP branches are in the genealogical time frame, around 10 % are even under 500 years (my cluster is solid at 250 years when our first ancestor settled in South Carolina in 1750). Here is a link to my L226 chart (to my Casey surname cluster):

http://www.rcasey.net/DNA/R_L226/Haplotrees/L226_Home.pdf#Page=36

asm
06-06-2018, 07:57 PM
In my opinion,it's useful for regions with ethnic conflicts to see how enemy nations are actually genetically related to each other and how assimilation is real.