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docardlove1980
10-15-2013, 07:58 AM
Everyone in my family is large, that we know of. My dad is adopted so we do not know past him, but everyone else is overweight, most dramatically so. I mean at least 50 pounds over as the minimum.
I, myself, am 5 foot 4 and I weight 155 lbs. I had a baby delivered via C-section 6 months ago, and I have not started exercising yet although I breastfeed. I weights 150 before getting pregnant. The top of my normal weight would be 145lbs so I'm not majorly overweight, but slightly so. I just read that C-section increases the child's risk of obesity, and since we already have a family history of that as well as heart problems and diabetes(both exacerbated by weight), I am concerned for myself and my daughter. How can we beat genetics? She also has larger people on her dad's side of the family. Any advice?
help me !
thanks

soulblighter
10-15-2013, 02:10 PM
Everyone in my family is large, that we know of. My dad is adopted so we do not know past him, but everyone else is overweight, most dramatically so. I mean at least 50 pounds over as the minimum.
I, myself, am 5 foot 4 and I weight 155 lbs. I had a baby delivered via C-section 6 months ago, and I have not started exercising yet although I breastfeed. I weights 150 before getting pregnant. The top of my normal weight would be 145lbs so I'm not majorly overweight, but slightly so. I just read that C-section increases the child's risk of obesity, and since we already have a family history of that as well as heart problems and diabetes(both exacerbated by weight), I am concerned for myself and my daughter. How can we beat genetics? She also has larger people on her dad's side of the family. Any advice?
help me !
thanks

I am sorry that you have to worry about this. There is nothing you could really do about your genes. So the only thing under your control is the environment.
I suggest going vegetarian (a healthy vegetarian diet without butter/cheese/margarine that is) if you are not one already. Rely more on vegetables and cellulose rich foods. Include Yogurt and low fat milk and appropriate amount of carbs for a healthy balanced diet. AVOID ANY AND ALL SUGAR.
Combined with an active lifestyle, I hope the situation can be managed.
Not saying this out of any ideological belief, but I have seen it help some.

alan
10-15-2013, 03:44 PM
One major factor that must be partly genetic for some is the way a person's insulin works. I have heard that going on a strict very low calories diet can reset insulin to normal levels. There was an documentary on British TV that said that the real problem is sugar, rather than fat, often added to processed food - even to diet products. Its even in the meat when the animals are fed on corn as is the norm in the US I understand (in NW Europe and Argentina they are usually fed on grass). The best bet I think is to avoid processed foods and basically buy veg, meat etc fresh. If you dont have a lot of time you could make up large batches of homemade stuff like soup, chilli, curry, stew etc, portion them into plastic containers and freeze them so you have a supply of ready meals that you know what is in them. A large slow cooker is great for that sort of thing. The other thing I think to avoid is refined carbohydrates - just replace with the brown/wholemeal version of bread, pasta, bagels, rice etc. In general, all carbohydrates should be eaten in small portions IMO as I understand the body turns them into sugar an excess is turned into fat. Fat does tend to fall off people when they go low carb although I would not recommend the extreme ones like Atkins. Another thing I would say is read the labels on any processed stuff you buy like sauces etc because similar products often have very different amount of bad things like sugar, salt, fat, calories etc. Also watch salt. Its not directly related to fat but there is no point in being thin but having a stroke. Again best way to avoid is to buy fresh unprocessed ingredients and make yourself meals. If you dont have the time, read the labels on any processed foods as similar products can have very different amounts of salt. Choosing carefully can reduce your salt intake massively.

ADW_1981
10-16-2013, 07:35 PM
Everyone in my family is large, that we know of. My dad is adopted so we do not know past him, but everyone else is overweight, most dramatically so. I mean at least 50 pounds over as the minimum.
I, myself, am 5 foot 4 and I weight 155 lbs. I had a baby delivered via C-section 6 months ago, and I have not started exercising yet although I breastfeed. I weights 150 before getting pregnant. The top of my normal weight would be 145lbs so I'm not majorly overweight, but slightly so. I just read that C-section increases the child's risk of obesity, and since we already have a family history of that as well as heart problems and diabetes(both exacerbated by weight), I am concerned for myself and my daughter. How can we beat genetics? She also has larger people on her dad's side of the family. Any advice?
help me !
thanks

Manage what you eat, and some exercise. There is no predetermination in this life.

L200
10-18-2013, 10:40 PM
Include Yogurt and low fat milk AVOID ANY AND ALL SUGAR.
Combined with an active lifestyle, I hope the situation can be managed.
.
With commercial Yogurts a lot of sugar is added to make it palatable. The Greek style is better, but to be on the safe side, but I have given up on all Yogurt. As suggested, try to exercise more in direct sunlight if possible.

soulblighter
10-18-2013, 11:02 PM
With commercial Yogurts a lot of sugar is added to make it palatable. The Greek style is better, but to be on the safe side, but I have given up on all Yogurt. As suggested, try to exercise more in direct sunlight if possible.

i only get the plain kind. I add cold pressed flax seed oil to it and it has a spicy nutty flavor!

Book
10-19-2013, 10:04 PM
Eat natural foods especially foods that your family's ancestry have eaten. Just make sure that the ingredients are also produced the way they were originally done. Eat foods that release sugar slowly such as black beans to prevent blood glucose levels from elevating above normal. Exercise regularly but only 30 minutes to 1 hour a day for four or five days a week. Overexercising is bad because it tends to make people too hungry, and they binge, and it also makes your body want to store more fat as it may activate the fight or flight response. Keep stress levels reduced as much as possible. Increased stress may activate the flight or fight response also making you want to store fat, and stress does make people want to eat more.

alan
10-26-2013, 11:07 AM
Basically processed food is a serious problem - loaded with salt and sugar even when it is low fat. Avoiding sugar and salt seems to be far more important than avoiding fat. Sugar just messes up your system and we were not made genetically to take a lot of sugar. Most of it is hidden even in savoury foods. Simple carbs when eaten basically as far as I understand quickly turn to sugar in your blood with excess turning to fat. Sugar is basically a poison that in raised quantities destroys your stone age body system which is built for the odd berry and fruit in season and much of it is hidden in processed foods. Basically if food needs to have tons of sugar during processing to make it palatable then should we be eating it anyway? Anyway if you make it yourself - make large amounts and freeze in portions - then you at least know what you are eating. In general food, sugar etc is addictive and it is hard at first to significantly decrease amounts but if you ride it out for a week or so your body loses its worst addictions and it becomes easier.

There is no doubt that carbohydrates are cheaper than protein so for many of us its not a viable financial option for many of us. However, wholemeal versions of carbohydrates are better because they are harder for the body to process so the release of sugar into the bloodstream is slower. I dont understand why people dont just use wholemeal versions of pasta, spaggeti, bread, pizza bases/dough, even some ready made wholemeal rices are nice. I think you either would not really notice the difference or you quickly would come to not notice.

The third thing component beyond the expensive proteins and the obviious pasta/bread type carbs is vegetables. Again if you eat processed vegetarian foods you will still be eating a ton of hidden sugar, salt etc. However, if done reasonably fresh there is a great deal of evidence that a large vegetarian element to a diet is very healthy. Apparently high blood pressure is virtually unknown among vegetarians.

TigerMW
10-29-2013, 01:59 AM
My boss and I and a peer go back and forth on this. There are a number of documentaries you can watch as well as books to read.

My heart doctor is promoting the "Caveman diet" which is heavy in protein, albeit wild game, not corn-fed fatted animals. Lots of vegatables and fruits are part of it too. However, carbohydrates, whole grain or not, are considered essentially poison for this kind of diet. The chapter about the sequence over the years towards diabetes, heart disease and dementia scared the heck out of me. I could see how my father progressed and how I'm headed down the same road.

Anyway, I've watched the "whole plant food" no/low meat diet documentaries too and read the hours of back and forth on the studies and counter-arguments and counter-counter arguments. My boss went into this whole hog but found his body countered by producing some of the wrong stuff. He may have gone overboard so I'm not saying he followed everything correctly.

At the end of the day, looking for the common denomators... we are settling on:

processed foods of any kind = really bad
naturally raised fish = good
vegetables = always good
fruits = good but to a point
grains and cereals = probably bad, too much really bad
whole grains = maybe okay but to a point
farm raised/fatted livestock = bad and really bad
cheese = bad
wild (& grass fed) meats = maybe good, maybe just okay

My opinion is to lean away from carbo's as much as possible. In my case, my family disposition may make this more important, but I understand that all carbohydrates can only do one thing.. be converted into sugar which must be used or stored or otherwise mess up the bloodstream. My understanding is that sugar is absolutely critical to brain and heart function. So much so that we will barely last without it, like a diabetic when their sugar levels drop. The problem is our bodies had to become masters of sugar preservation and we are very efficient sugar conserving machine due to the ages of food shortages and swings. Now we are dumping gallons in to our blood stream.

Il PapÓ
10-29-2013, 10:09 PM
Don't eat ,problem solve

authun
11-07-2013, 11:36 PM
An individual's propensity to lay down fat is highly complex and probably starts with the production of the many different types of digestive enzymes. As we have seen with the enzyme lactase, an enzyme required to digest the disaccharide lactose, is produced by some people, but not the majority of people. Moreover, those who do produce it, can produce it via different genetic mechanisms. We have a similar variance with the dehydrogenase enzymes which break down alcohols. Carbohydrates are made up of many different types with broad groups such as the monosaccharides, disaccharides and the polysaccharides, where in many cases, each group contains specific carbohydrates each one of which may require a specific enzyme. Some carbohydrates for example, some oligosaccharides, are not digested by enzymes but are broken down by bacteria in the intestine. Pulses and beans contain a lot of these and typically give you wind. Some carbohydrates start to be digested in the mouth, by enzymes in the saliva, triggered by chewing. Some beta carbohydrates, the cellulose based groups, are not digested or broken down at all. Humans don't produce cellulase. Typically we call this roughage, or non digestible fibre.

We are all different. That's how selective evolution works. The problem is that food production is becoming increasingly mechanised and standardised with a focus on a high degree of refinement, for commerical purposes.

The Pacific Islanders of Nauru (http://ajw.asahi.com/article/globe/feature/obesity/aj201205270051) had a healthy diet, based on fishing and some crops and an active lifestyle. Then phosphate was discovered, they became richer, became less active and switched to more refined carbs. They now have diabetes levels in excess of 40%. This has happened in little more than a single generation. One can imagine that, were evolutionary natural selection left to its own devices, without intervention, the islanders would die out within a few generations.

There is some research interest in the vermiform appendix, an organ found in humans and which used to be much bigger. It used to produce the cellulase that we needed in our leaf eating days. We still 'grow' this organ, why? It seems that once it's primary function is lost, such organs can take on a secondary role, in this case, producing either new enzymes as yet undetermined or digestive bacteria.

Evolution is a game of chance and the chances are that, whilst a food shortage may cause a population crash, some humans will survive, because they can eat foods that most cannot.

alan
11-08-2013, 12:36 AM
One of the big problems is the sheer variety and temptations out there. Even in my own lifetime its incredible how its changed. My parents would typically eat something little like homemade soup for lunch and tea would usually be meat or poultry from the butchers of some sort or fish from the fishmongers, usually served with boiled potatoes of some sort and maybe peas, carrot or cabbage. Basically 'meat and two veg' with one of the veg usually being potatoes. Very plain food maybe with gravy but with no rich sauces. That was pretty well the pattern every day of the week. While it seems a boring diet now, one thing I can say looking back is that they didnt tend to eat or feed us ready made processed food. I found all sorts of spicy sauced food pretty adictive so I tended to go the processed food way for a long time but I have been weaning myself away from this and going back to making my own stuff (pretty simple stuff) mostly from scratch. I grow a lot of my own organic vegetables too as I have an allotment that I pay a very small annual rent for. This year I have got it a bit unbalanced and seem to have a mountain of potatoes.

authun
11-08-2013, 09:21 AM
My parents would typically eat something little like homemade soup for lunch and tea would usually be meat or poultry from the butchers of some sort or fish from the fishmongers, usually served with boiled potatoes of some sort and maybe peas, carrot or cabbage.

I remember as a student in Newcastle in the early 1970s, talking to a butcher who told me that, in the 60s, he would have a dozen sheep heads in the window and that they'd all be gone by lunchtime. "If I did that now, no one would come in the shop" he added.

I cook everything from scratch and don't rely on anything out of tins or packets save for somethings like chopped tomatoes or some tinned fish. In a week I aim for two red meat days, two fish days, two poultry days and one vegetarian day. I only eat wholegrain carbs, rye bread, wholewheat pasta, brown rice, pearl barley, quinoa etc. I eat well but have lost a lot of weight on this diet. It doesn't need to be boring though. Spices don't add on the pounds. It's the take away sauces they put the spices in that are thick, sweet and gloupy. Alternatively, food combinations and the way they are cooked make a huge difference. I highly recommend Hugh Fearnley Wittingstall's Three Good Things on a Plate (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hughs-Three-Good-Things-Fearnley-Whittingstall/dp/1408828588) for combinations, Prashad's Indian Vegetarian Cooking (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Prashad-Cookbook-Indian-Vegetarian-Cooking/dp/1444734717/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1383901874&sr=1-1&keywords=prashad+indian+vegetarian+cooking) for indian style dishes which bear no resemblance to anything found in your local take away and Ching-He Huang's book on healthy chinese cooking, Chinese Food Made Easy (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chinese-Food-Made-Ching-He-Huang/dp/0007264984)

Alternatively, you can just get an old cookbook with traditional recipes:


http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2011/3/14/1300096211550/Lamb-stew-with-pearl-barl-006.jpg

amerinese
11-10-2013, 06:18 AM
I am sorry that you have to worry about this. There is nothing you could really do about your genes. So the only thing under your control is the environment.
I suggest going vegetarian (a healthy vegetarian diet without butter/cheese/margarine that is) if you are not one already. Rely more on vegetables and cellulose rich foods. Include Yogurt and low fat milk and appropriate amount of carbs for a healthy balanced diet. AVOID ANY AND ALL SUGAR.
Combined with an active lifestyle, I hope the situation can be managed.
Not saying this out of any ideological belief, but I have seen it help some.

My paternal side is generally lean, while my maternal grandfather's side seems to be predispositioned towards obesity.

Anyway, I fully support and abide by your suggestion to remove excessive sugars and other simple carbohydrates from your diet. Also margarine, that synthetic stuff is evil and not really intended for human consumption.

Just omitting sugar, bread, rice, beer, etc. from my diet, and focusing on meats, legumes, and fresh vegetables works wonders for my metabolism. This is coming from a guy who consumes more than his share of red meat and single-malt scotch.

authun
11-10-2013, 08:06 PM
This is coming from a guy who consumes more than his share of red meat and single-malt scotch.


mmmmm Steak Balmoral, fillet steak in whisky and mushroom sauce

MJost
11-10-2013, 09:51 PM
My Wife said most of this is similar to Dr. Fuhrman who has a 'Spotlight on Diabetes' which promotes non-high glycemic foods with emphasis on soups and salads, with no or small portions of meats (no-red meats) on the side. We are both Type II and my wife is a skinny rail and I am 6'1" at 250lbs.

MJost