PDA

View Full Version : Living DNA Parent vs Child Comparison



sktibo
12-03-2018, 04:05 PM
As I now have results for each parent (uploaded from Ancestry) I wanted to compare them against my own results. Having being very confused about my initial Living DNA results, the results for my parents have cleared up some questions I had about which regions can actually be assigned to what. Unfortunately the results do not add up to anything even close to what I was assigned, but I think they are interesting nonetheless.

-----------------

Dad's paper trail:

Not from Britain:

3.9% Native American
16.4% French

England:

25% Central England: Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Staffordshire.

25% South-West England and possibly Wales (his grandmother was born in Wales, first language Welsh, but ancestry appears mostly English):
3.125% Wiltshire
9.375% Gloucestershire
6.25% Somerset
6.25% Unknown, possibly Welsh, unconfirmed.

Scotland:

1.56% Orkney
3.125% Easter Ross
6.25% Lowland Perthshire
9.375% Stirling, specifically St. Ninians.
3.125% Ayrshire
6.25% Highland Perthshire

----------------------

Mom's paper trail:

Galicia, Poland:

50% Unknown mixture of Eastern German and Eastern European. I believe it is 25% German and 25% Polish, but I don't know for sure.

Northern Ireland:

12.5% Coleraine, listed their ethnic origins as Scottish on censuses.
3.125% Aberdeen, Scotland
9.375% Unknown, Presbyterian on census records.

Britain:

6.25% East Riding of Yorkshire
3.125% Wiltshire
3.125% Devonshire
6.25% Roxburghshire

Colonial American:

6.25% - most likely a combination of Dutch, English, and French.

----------------------

Dad's results (Complete mode):

28.4% NW Scotland
21.9% Aberdeenshire
7.9% SW Scotland and Northern Ireland
2.5% Ireland

31% Germanic
2.7% Sardinia
2.5% Basque

1.8% Mesoamerica
1.2% NW Caucasus

On standard mode his results are the same except that NW Scotland and SW Scotland disappear and become Britain Unassigned. This is truly weird as those are the only two British regions assigned to him which he actually has ancestry from.

------------------------

Mom's results (Complete mode):

13.6% SE England
9.7% Northumbria
6.5% Ireland
5.1% North Yorkshire
4.6% Cumbria
3.8% South Central England
2% Lincolnshire
1.9% Orkney
1.3% South Yorkshire
1.2% Devon

38.9% Northeast Europe
11.4% North Italy

The only change on Standard is 1.2% Devon becomes Britain Unassigned.

---------------------------

My results, uploaded, Complete mode:

22.8% Northumbria
19% Aberdeenshire
15.3% NW Scotland (Becomes Britain Unassigned on Standard mode, as my Dad's does.)
8.5% South England
4.7% South Central England
4.6% SW Scotland and Northern Ireland
4.4% Cumbria
4.3% Ireland
3% Central England
1.7% South Wales
1.4% Devon
1.4% Orkney
1.2% Lincolnshire
1.1% North Yorkshire (Becomes Unassigned on Standard mode.)

5.1% East Balkans

1.4% Mesoamerica

My results, Orion chip, Complete mode:

42.1% Northumbria
11.5% Aberdeenshire
5.6% Devon
5.2% South England
4.4% South Central England
2.8% South Wales
2.4% Cumbria
2.2% East Anglia
2.1% SE England
1.9% Orkney
1.5% Cornwall

7.2% Scandinavia
1.3% Baltics
1.2% Finland and W Russia
1.1% West Balkans
1.2% Iberian Peninsula

3.1% NW Caucasus
1.7% Mesoamerica
1.4% Kurdish

-------------------------

It seems to me from these results that Living DNA should not be used as a reliable method of tracking where your ancestors came from in Britain, or perhaps anywhere at all. While it is normal for parent child comparisons on autosomal DNA tests not to add up, this one is truly far off. When I first had my Living DNA test done I was perplexed as to why I received such a high Northumbrian percentage, and I feel that has now been laid to rest with the results from my parents in: absolutely no reason. I thought it was interesting that my mom received a very plausible Northumbrian percentage from her upload however. My mom got Orkney, my dad didn't, and my dad is the one with Orcadian ancestry. My dad got Aberdeenshire without any ancestry from the area (This might indicate that Central Scottish ancestry can indeed show as Aberdeenshire on Living DNA) while my mom got none. I thought it was notable that Mom's Northern Irish ancestry appeared as a combination of Cumbria plus Ireland, rather than SW Scotland and NI. Dad's results indicate that Ireland can appear with no Irish ancestry. Particularly shocking was his massive percentage of Germanic, of which my first thought is that is must be his English ancestry, but I can't say with certainty.

While I have seen some very good looking results from Living DNA, be aware that the results can be as strange as these ones!

msmarjoribanks
12-03-2018, 04:15 PM
Very interesting. I know my dad's regions pretty well (some gaps from his colonial ancestry I should start working on again in the meantime), so am very excited to see my parents' uploads when they are complete, so I can do something similar.

sktibo
12-03-2018, 04:28 PM
Very interesting. I know my dad's regions pretty well (some gaps from his colonial ancestry I should start working on again in the meantime), so am very excited to see my parents' uploads when they are complete, so I can do something similar.

Looking forward to your comparison!

sktibo
12-03-2018, 05:08 PM
I just wanted to throw this out there in case anyone has ideas about it:

My result, (the upload) which included significant percentages from Southern England and actually had a Central English percentage, is more accurate than my father's (for England) according to our paper trail. Is this just random chance or is there some way the test can decipher ancestry from my data but not my fathers? I think it is quite strange.

C J Wyatt III
12-03-2018, 06:50 PM
I just wanted to throw this out there in case anyone has ideas about it:

My result, which included significant percentages from Southern England and actually had a Central English percentage, is more accurate than my father's (for England) according to our paper trail. Is this just random chance or is there some way the test can decipher ancestry from my data but not my fathers? I think it is quite strange.

I'd say chance. From what I see, all of the admixture/ethnicity utilities are missing something really material. Besides, they have no way of proving their results. People tend to try different ones until they find what seems right for themselves.

Myself, I just regard admixture analysis as a parlour game. I think we have to first figure out how to prove with confidence a common ancestor a few hundred years back before we will be able to make advances with Admixture.

Just my opinion, of course.

Jack

Angriff
12-04-2018, 05:54 AM
I just wanted to throw this out there in case anyone has ideas about it:

My result, which included significant percentages from Southern England and actually had a Central English percentage, is more accurate than my father's (for England) according to our paper trail. Is this just random chance or is there some way the test can decipher ancestry from my data but not my fathers? I think it is quite strange.

It might be an issue of the SNP dataset in the ancestry data not including some of the markers they're using to differentiate, since yours was done via their own lab vs the uploaded data.

sktibo
12-04-2018, 06:58 AM
It might be an issue of the SNP dataset in the ancestry data not including some of the markers they're using to differentiate, since yours was done via their own lab vs the uploaded data.

please note that i have included two sets of results for myself, the more accurate of the two was an upload.
The results I am referring to in my question are the uploaded results.

Kathlingram
12-05-2018, 12:19 PM
It might be an issue of the SNP dataset in the ancestry data not including some of the markers they're using to differentiate, since yours was done via their own lab vs the uploaded data.

I think that those of us who have tested elsewhere are fortunate that we can see our ancestry more clearly.. I tested at 23andme as a Beta tester in 2009 and that is still very accurate.. AncestryDNA is now close behind that with newer Geographic Communities just out.. They identified my paternal Carlow and my mother's grandmother's native Donegal is broken out into West Donegal etc. My Sister's and first cousin picks up our Beara peninsula..which they named as such..
I tested upon advice of a professional who found Living DNA very specific.. to figure out my considerable Wales matches.. It has not happened at all nor has my Irish been correctly identified and the 9-11% of my genome which is continental by paper trail and every other testing company is ignored..
I uploaded my son and we do not yet have a match.. I do have Living DNA matches at MyHeritage and Gedmatch Genesis.. I fail to see why they can't pull some of this out and get it right..

Wolf
12-09-2018, 02:06 PM
As I now have results for each parent (uploaded from Ancestry) I wanted to compare them against my own results. Having being very confused about my initial Living DNA results, the results for my parents have cleared up some questions I had about which regions can actually be assigned to what. Unfortunately the results do not add up to anything even close to what I was assigned, but I think they are interesting nonetheless.

-----------------

Dad's paper trail:

Not from Britain:

3.9% Native American
16.4% French

England:

25% Central England: Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Staffordshire.

25% South-West England and possibly Wales (his grandmother was born in Wales, first language Welsh, but ancestry appears mostly English):
3.125% Wiltshire
9.375% Gloucestershire
6.25% Somerset
6.25% Unknown, possibly Welsh, unconfirmed.

Scotland:

1.56% Orkney
3.125% Easter Ross
6.25% Lowland Perthshire
9.375% Stirling, specifically St. Ninians.
3.125% Ayrshire
6.25% Highland Perthshire

----------------------

Mom's paper trail:

Galicia, Poland:

50% Unknown mixture of Eastern German and Eastern European. I believe it is 25% German and 25% Polish, but I don't know for sure.

Northern Ireland:

12.5% Coleraine, listed their ethnic origins as Scottish on censuses.
3.125% Aberdeen, Scotland
9.375% Unknown, Presbyterian on census records.

Britain:

6.25% East Riding of Yorkshire
3.125% Wiltshire
3.125% Devonshire
6.25% Roxburghshire

Colonial American:

6.25% - most likely a combination of Dutch, English, and French.

----------------------

Dad's results (Complete mode):

28.4% NW Scotland
21.9% Aberdeenshire
7.9% SW Scotland and Northern Ireland
2.5% Ireland

31% Germanic
2.7% Sardinia
2.5% Basque

1.8% Mesoamerica
1.2% NW Caucasus

On standard mode his results are the same except that NW Scotland and SW Scotland disappear and become Britain Unassigned. This is truly weird as those are the only two British regions assigned to him which he actually has ancestry from.

------------------------

Mom's results (Complete mode):

13.6% SE England
9.7% Northumbria
6.5% Ireland
5.1% North Yorkshire
4.6% Cumbria
3.8% South Central England
2% Lincolnshire
1.9% Orkney
1.3% South Yorkshire
1.2% Devon

38.9% Northeast Europe
11.4% North Italy

The only change on Standard is 1.2% Devon becomes Britain Unassigned.

---------------------------

My results, uploaded, Complete mode:

22.8% Northumbria
19% Aberdeenshire
15.3% NW Scotland (Becomes Britain Unassigned on Standard mode, as my Dad's does.)
8.5% South England
4.7% South Central England
4.6% SW Scotland and Northern Ireland
4.4% Cumbria
4.3% Ireland
3% Central England
1.7% South Wales
1.4% Devon
1.4% Orkney
1.2% Lincolnshire
1.1% North Yorkshire (Becomes Unassigned on Standard mode.)

5.1% East Balkans

1.4% Mesoamerica

My results, Orion chip, Complete mode:

42.1% Northumbria
11.5% Aberdeenshire
5.6% Devon
5.2% South England
4.4% South Central England
2.8% South Wales
2.4% Cumbria
2.2% East Anglia
2.1% SE England
1.9% Orkney
1.5% Cornwall

7.2% Scandinavia
1.3% Baltics
1.2% Finland and W Russia
1.1% West Balkans
1.2% Iberian Peninsula

3.1% NW Caucasus
1.7% Mesoamerica
1.4% Kurdish

-------------------------

It seems to me from these results that Living DNA should not be used as a reliable method of tracking where your ancestors came from in Britain, or perhaps anywhere at all. While it is normal for parent child comparisons on autosomal DNA tests not to add up, this one is truly far off. When I first had my Living DNA test done I was perplexed as to why I received such a high Northumbrian percentage, and I feel that has now been laid to rest with the results from my parents in: absolutely no reason. I thought it was interesting that my mom received a very plausible Northumbrian percentage from her upload however. My mom got Orkney, my dad didn't, and my dad is the one with Orcadian ancestry. My dad got Aberdeenshire without any ancestry from the area (This might indicate that Central Scottish ancestry can indeed show as Aberdeenshire on Living DNA) while my mom got none. I thought it was notable that Mom's Northern Irish ancestry appeared as a combination of Cumbria plus Ireland, rather than SW Scotland and NI. Dad's results indicate that Ireland can appear with no Irish ancestry. Particularly shocking was his massive percentage of Germanic, of which my first thought is that is must be his English ancestry, but I can't say with certainty.

While I have seen some very good looking results from Living DNA, be aware that the results can be as strange as these ones!

How's your knowledge of the UK?

sktibo
12-09-2018, 07:12 PM
How's your knowledge of the UK?

What do you mean? Is there a specific question you want to ask?

Wolf
12-10-2018, 12:03 AM
Is there a specific question you want to ask?

Yes. How good's your knowledge of the UK?

Cause your results are not terribly inaccurate.