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utR!
12-03-2013, 05:29 PM
This article made me cuorious why we do eat so much red meat here in western world?

http://www.realclearscience.com/journal_club/2013/12/02/humans_arent_at_the_top_of_food_chain_108384.html

:hungry: ?

utR!

basque
12-03-2013, 07:54 PM
This article made me cuorious why we do eat so much red meat here in western world?

http://www.realclearscience.com/journal_club/2013/12/02/humans_arent_at_the_top_of_food_chain_108384.html

:hungry: ?

utR!

I dont eat much red meat if i do its usually lamb (very well done) I mostly eat chicken also very well done. I cant stand fish cant even be in the same room where fish is being prepared :fear:

basque :rolleyes:

Scarlet Ibis
12-03-2013, 08:27 PM
I cant stand fish cant even be in the same room where fish is being prepared :fear:

basque :rolleyes:

lol That last bit reminded me of my sister. Whenever my mom would start cooking mackerel, my sister would run upstairs to her room, shut the door, and try to make it airtight by stuffing shirts, and towels underneath the door.

basque
12-03-2013, 10:03 PM
lol That last bit reminded me of my sister. Whenever my mom would start cooking mackerel, my sister would run upstairs to her room, shut the door, and try to make it airtight by stuffing shirts, and towels underneath the door.

:laugh:A few years back I reluctantly went to a fish restaurant, i chose a none fish meal but the aroma from the fish was so overwhelming and engulfed my food :faint: I could not eat it and went and sat outside. Good job it was summer.

basque :rolleyes: As for kippers....yuk

thetick
12-04-2013, 01:20 AM
This article made me cuorious why we do eat so much red meat here in western world?

Because meat tastes so good. I'm a member of PETA (People Eating Tasty Animals)

http://designsbylindanee.com/xcart/images/P/14%20photo-02.jpg

TŠltos
12-04-2013, 03:29 AM
I actually started to enjoy steak even more after I was "with child". Craved it! :hungry:

utR!
12-04-2013, 04:46 PM
:laugh:A few years back I reluctantly went to a fish restaurant, i chose a none fish meal but the aroma from the fish was so overwhelming and engulfed my food :faint: I could not eat it and went and sat outside. Good job it was summer.

basque :rolleyes: As for kippers....yuk

Sometimes fish is smelling quite disguisting but when it is ready and well cooked/fried/spiced it can taste nice.

Smell can really affect the way you almost faint. And how much people still eat rotten and badsmelling food because that what they only have. Sad but true if you want to be alive.

utR!

utR!
12-04-2013, 04:50 PM
I actually started to enjoy steak even more after I was "with child". Craved it! :hungry:

Tell more why it was different when you were with child?

utR!

utR!
12-04-2013, 04:52 PM
Because meat tastes so good. I'm a member of PETA (People Eating Tasty Animals)

http://designsbylindanee.com/xcart/images/P/14%20photo-02.jpg

Never heard about PETA. Is it in your country or in other countries? You members do you have meetings in good restaurants eating together or so?

utR!

Clinton P
12-04-2013, 05:03 PM
Charles Darwin had a huge interest in food, and during his time in Cambridge he was the President of the infamous Glutton Club. The main objective of the club was to seek and eat "strange flesh" and dine upon the rarest "birds and beasts which were before unknown to human palate". The club met weekly and was a roaring success. They ate such beautiful birds as the bittern and hawk. The club eventually came to an abrupt end when a tawny owl was served up.
On the Beagle voyage he ate armadilloes ('taste like duck'), puma ('veal'), iguana and Giant Tortoise. A Phylum Feast is a shared meal containing as many different species as possible, eaten by biologists on February 12th to celebrate Darwinís birthday.

Clinton P

MikeWhalen
12-04-2013, 07:27 PM
I especially love meat cooked on the BBQ-whether it is steak, on hamburgs or greek style lamb shishqabobs, I love the bit of char and or caramelization that occures when does just 'right'...so juicy and flavorful!

-its probably not a co incidence that many people love thier meat BBQ'ed which is of course, the modern equivalent of how our ancient ancestors would have cooked thier meat...over an open campfire-do you think that was done for enough centuries that the flavor profile got 'hard wired' into our likes and dislikes?

my next fav meat is turkey/chicken roasted in an oven and served with a nice gravy made of its own juices...mmmmmmm

I too dislike the smell of fish being cooked and while I dont have the strong reaction that the other posters mentions, I do dislike it very much and it could spoil my enjoyment of my meal if too strong

Mike

newtoboard
12-04-2013, 07:30 PM
The only type of fish I like grilled salmon or maybe fried tilapia. Other fish are too fishy for me. Not a big fan of seafood in general. Lamb and Goat are underrated imo.

newtoboard
12-04-2013, 07:31 PM
I especially love meat cooked on the BBQ-whether it is steak, on hamburgs or greek style lamb shishqabobs, I love the bit of char and or caramelization that occures when does just 'right'...so juicy and flavorful!

-its probably not a co incidence that many people love thier meat BBQ'ed which is of course, the modern equivalent of how our ancient ancestors would have cooked thier meat...over an open campfire-do you think that was done for enough centuries that the flavor profile got 'hard wired' into our likes and dislikes?

my next fav meat is turkey/chicken roasted in an oven and served with a nice gravy made of its own juices...mmmmmmm

I too dislike the smell of fish being cooked and while I dont have the strong reaction that the other posters mentions, I do dislike it very much and it could spoil my enjoyment of my meal if too strong

Mike

Not be annoying or anything but what you described is more like grilling not BBQ ing.

basque
12-04-2013, 07:37 PM
Charles Darwin had a huge interest in food, and during his time in Cambridge he was the President of the infamous Glutton Club. The main objective of the club was to seek and eat "strange flesh" and dine upon the rarest "birds and beasts which were before unknown to human palate". The club met weekly and was a roaring success. They ate such beautiful birds as the bittern and hawk. The club eventually came to an abrupt end when a tawny owl was served up.
On the Beagle voyage he ate armadilloes ('taste like duck'), puma ('veal'), iguana and Giant Tortoise. A Phylum Feast is a shared meal containing as many different species as possible, eaten by biologists on February 12th to celebrate Darwinís birthday.

Clinton P

A Glutton Club restaurant (curious eats) has opened up in Shrewsbury Shropshire it is based on Darwins glutton club. Having lived in Shrewsbury for a while I was interested in this.
http://www.visitsouthshropshire.co.uk/news-article.php?id=1966 :hungry:

basque :rolleyes:

TŠltos
12-04-2013, 07:55 PM
Tell more why it was different when you were with child?

utR!
I'm not really sure. I would usually prefer chicken and fish, but once I was pregnant, it was red meat all the way. I kind of figured it was just maybe needing extra protein for the baby. Most pregnant women supposedly crave ice cream and pickles in the middle of the night, my poor husband had to go out at 4 am for beef jerky. And that was because I was having an intense craving for Venison (deer) jerky! I would also crave milk, would go through a gallon by myself every two days. My husband, poor guy never had any left over for him. Interestingly enough in that time period I also developed a love for grapefruit and grapefruit juice. I would never have consumed them before that.

TŠltos
12-04-2013, 08:09 PM
I especially love meat cooked on the BBQ-whether it is steak, on hamburgs or greek style lamb shishqabobs, I love the bit of char and or caramelization that occures when does just 'right'...so juicy and flavorful!

-its probably not a co incidence that many people love thier meat BBQ'ed which is of course, the modern equivalent of how our ancient ancestors would have cooked thier meat...over an open campfire-do you think that was done for enough centuries that the flavor profile got 'hard wired' into our likes and dislikes?

my next fav meat is turkey/chicken roasted in an oven and served with a nice gravy made of its own juices...mmmmmmm

I too dislike the smell of fish being cooked and while I dont have the strong reaction that the other posters mentions, I do dislike it very much and it could spoil my enjoyment of my meal if too strong

Mike
LOL this post was making me seriously hungry until I read the part about the fish smell!

Joe B
12-04-2013, 09:04 PM
Dad was a Metzgermeister (Augsburg). The meat was always choice and the grill ready to go.
http://www.fleischportal.de/images/sobipro/entries/573/img_Augsburg-Fleischerschule-Mittel.jpg

MikeWhalen
12-04-2013, 11:07 PM
lol, 'newto', must be honest and I'm not sure what the difference is...I do my meat on a propane bbq-thats what we all call it up here anyway

I do watch and enjoy some of the american tv competition bbq shows-now those guys are serious and think using gas is heresy...fruit wood, indirect steam and many hours with many layers of spice and rub and sause and such-mmmmm

Mike



Not be annoying or anything but what you described is more like grilling not BBQ ing.

Ian B
12-05-2013, 12:58 AM
Australias traditional summer time meal, barby and a beer. :beerchug:

newtoboard
12-05-2013, 01:26 PM
lol, 'newto', must be honest and I'm not sure what the difference is...I do my meat on a propane bbq-thats what we all call it up here anyway

I do watch and enjoy some of the american tv competition bbq shows-now those guys are serious and think using gas is heresy...fruit wood, indirect steam and many hours with many layers of spice and rub and sause and such-mmmmm

Mike

Yea that is exactly the difference in my mind. Grilling uses direct heat while BBQ uses indirect heat.

ilmari
12-06-2013, 12:52 AM
We ate so much red meat when I was growing up, I'm not very fond of it these days [we had beef cattle]. I probably consume less than 2 pounds of red meat in any given year. When I eat it, I want it hot and bloody and I want it to be a rib eye. If it isn't hot and bloody, then it must be eaten the next day, very cold.

Now it is lipeškala, lutfisk, lutefisk, ludefisk season, but I'll pass, and if I have to be in the same house where it is cooking, I'll pass out. :puke:

thetick
12-06-2013, 06:08 AM
Never heard about PETA. Is it in your country or in other countries? You members do you have meetings in good restaurants eating together or so?

utR!

It's not a REAL organization that I know of. It's to mock those people who think animals are equal to humans .. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) www.peta.org

I remember I was looking to end a blind date and recalled my date had no meat for dinner. I said, " I'm a member of PETA." She said I am too. I said, "Yea I just love all kinds of meat and butchering. PETA, People Eating Tasty Animals is a great organization. My grandfather was butcher and I still get such a thrill cutting up all the meat." She just got a disgusting look on her face and left. No words, no drama , no hassle and no awkwardness (for me)....

utR!
12-06-2013, 10:17 AM
Charles Darwin had a huge interest in food, and during his time in Cambridge he was the President of the infamous Glutton Club. The main objective of the club was to seek and eat "strange flesh" and dine upon the rarest "birds and beasts which were before unknown to human palate". The club met weekly and was a roaring success. They ate such beautiful birds as the bittern and hawk. The club eventually came to an abrupt end when a tawny owl was served up.
On the Beagle voyage he ate armadilloes ('taste like duck'), puma ('veal'), iguana and Giant Tortoise. A Phylum Feast is a shared meal containing as many different species as possible, eaten by biologists on February 12th to celebrate Darwin’s birthday.

Clinton P

There seem exists lot of animals which are eatable in this world quite few species are extinct. When you are really hungry you need to survive and hunt all sort of animals.

Have you been to a Phylum feast?

utR!

utR!
12-06-2013, 10:29 AM
It's not a REAL organization that I know of. It's to mock those people who think animals are equal to humans .. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) www.peta.org

I remember I was looking to end a blind date and recalled my date had no meat for dinner. I said, " I'm a member of PETA." She said I am too. I said, "Yea I just love all kinds of meat and butchering. PETA, People Eating Tasty Animals is a great organization. My grandfather was butcher and I still get such a thrill cutting up all the meat." She just got a disgusting look on her face and left. No words, no drama , no hassle and no awkwardness (for me)....

What a story you have to share. Animals are not equal to humans but they need to be treated well. They have been given for our good never to be idolized like monkeys, cows and others.

Most of females are not made to do some works like butchering or shooting and killing animals. It is , a bit bloody work but work as other work still. Also it needs to be done well and professionally.

utR!

utR!
12-06-2013, 10:37 AM
We ate so much red meat when I was growing up, I'm not very fond of it these days [we had beef cattle]. I probably consume less than 2 pounds of red meat in any given year. When I eat it, I want it hot and bloody and I want it to be a rib eye. If it isn't hot and bloody, then it must be eaten the next day, very cold.

Now it is lipeškala, lutfisk, lutefisk, ludefisk season, but I'll pass, and if I have to be in the same house where it is cooking, I'll pass out. :puke:

We had cattle when I was living in the farm. I got used to farmlife and animals.

We used to have that lipeškala for Christmas, my mother's and father's delicious food. Yes that smell was something I knew Xmas is coming ...

It is one of the food I do not want freely to eat. I like cod but it must have been some other fish that time.

But my mother's Karelian stew was best. She was an expert to cook it slowly in moderate/low temperature in the owen. Both pork and beef was well done and soft. The juice (a lot of it) was creasy and just right salt in it. Karelian stew was done only for the festivities mainly.

utR!

utR!
12-06-2013, 10:40 AM
Dad was a Metzgermeister (Augsburg). The meat was always choice and the grill ready to go.
http://www.fleischportal.de/images/sobipro/entries/573/img_Augsburg-Fleischerschule-Mittel.jpg

So you ate variable choice of meat food not only beef but others too?

utR!

utR!
12-06-2013, 10:54 AM
I'm not really sure. I would usually prefer chicken and fish, but once I was pregnant, it was red meat all the way. I kind of figured it was just maybe needing extra protein for the baby. Most pregnant women supposedly crave ice cream and pickles in the middle of the night, my poor husband had to go out at 4 am for beef jerky. And that was because I was having an intense craving for Venison (deer) jerky! I would also crave milk, would go through a gallon by myself every two days. My husband, poor guy never had any left over for him. Interestingly enough in that time period I also developed a love for grapefruit and grapefruit juice. I would never have consumed them before that.

Maybe it is natural instint to eat protein food for a baby to grow and be healty when to be born.

In meat beef there is 22 g protein/100 g. And it keeps a hunger away longer than cholehydrate.

And there are still white meat to be chosen taste is milder.

utR!

alan
12-06-2013, 11:11 PM
I am a believer that some people are much healthier when they stick to mainly stone age type diet of meat, fish, nuts, berries and leaves. A heavily carbohydrate diet was fairly late to arrive in northern Europe and even then the slump in the Neolthic farmers, probably due to the climate not being reliable for a continental template to be applied, soon led to a big downturn in cereals. Even until a century or so ago, bread really wasnt much eaten in places like western Ireland and the Scottish Highlands where oats were more reliable and the only significant cereal grown. The only big augment to the diet was the potato, which could grown in these conditions. The diet of milk, butter, potatos, eggs and fish (and whiskey lol) actually was a much healthier diet than the bread based diet of much of Europe. I think if you have that sort of ancestry then bread is really just an addition of the last 2 centuries or so and of course rice, pasta etc are very modern. People of that sort of ancestry have had far far less time to adapt to it than say Med. people who have been eating bread for the last 8 or 9 thousand years. I think sugar and carbs are the main reason for the obesity epidemic IMO. Northern Europeans in particular just are not adapted to that sort of diet where the energy largely goes straight into the blood as sugar.

alan
12-06-2013, 11:13 PM
I have also read that the American practice of corn or corn syrup feeding cattle actually shows the symptoms of diabetes in the animal in the fat patterning of the meat. This is not a problem in Europe and south America where they are grass fed.

Nirvana
12-07-2013, 01:36 AM
Yes there is a connection to obesity, but be careful not to blame it all on bread though. It is mostly due to sugars in additives in American diet today. Earlier people ate more bread than today but stayed slim. A man who worked on the field or factory in the early days had to have some carbohydrates. Also Med. diet is acknowledged as a main contributor for good health and lifespan. Here you do have a point though, that some people are more predisposed for certain foods, but not quite as much as you have explained.

It is trendy nowadays to dismiss bread for the sake of paleo-diet, as there are certainly predispositions to certain foods. But there is also a strange online hype for the idealized image of a brute warrior hunter who eats meat and bones (while bread is for wimps). I instead always had a picture of a skinny bushman instead, for some reason, and while an avid hunter gatherer, he is not known as a warrior though. And while hunter gathering technique is the best for it time, it would be impossible to cope with any significant rise in population. Today still, animal husbandry is the main cause of methane gases in the atmosphere. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy meat and dairy and I probably eat more of it than most people. But there is a lot of childish arrogance in this online trend, not realizing you, me, your computer and civilization as a whole wouldn't be here today if not for the pesky carbohydrates.

Irish potato love is a product of the so called Great famine actually. This happened despite the fact that Ireland produced more than enough crops to feed its people. Irish Catholics were actually prohibited from owning and leasing land among other things. The land question brought a system of the so called absentee landlords who used impoverished tenants to work the farms producing crops for export and being paid minimal wages. This idealized potato eating habit was in reality described like this: "It would be impossible adequately to describe the privations which they [Irish labourer and his family] habitually and silently endure . . . in many districts their only food is the potato, their only beverage water . . . their cabins are seldom a protection against the weather... a bed or a blanket is a rare luxury . . . and nearly in all their pig and a manure heap constitute their only property."

“Although the potato crop failed, the country was still producing and exporting more than enough grain crops to feed the population. „

Even then the potato was still not seen as staple food.
“By the late 17th century, it had become widespread as a supplementary rather than a principal food because the main diet still revolved around butter, milk, and grain products.“

There is actually a 30000 year old bread substitute used in Europe before the Neolithic immigrants.
Simple truth is that West Europe and quite a lot of north Europe has a bit deeper connection to bread than you would like to admit (strangely).
French are most renowned for the simple bread loaf. People were eating 3 baguettes a day in 1900 and were perfectly fit compared with today’s people who eat half a baguette. This trend started in seventies with a fall to one baguette daily. The love for bread in West Europe is probably passed down directly through the Gauls, Celts and Romans.

“ Pliny the Elder reported that the Gauls and Iberians used the foam skimmed from beer to produce "a lighter kind of bread than other peoples." Parts of the ancient world that drank wine instead of beer used a paste composed of grape mustand flour that was allowed to begin fermenting, or wheat bran steeped in wine, as a source for yeast.“


And, don’t think you would like to dissmiss out beer and whiskey yet. You know what we need for it.


I am a believer that some people are much healthier when they stick to mainly stone age type diet of meat, fish, nuts, berries and leaves. A heavily carbohydrate diet was fairly late to arrive in northern Europe and even then the slump in the Neolthic farmers, probably due to the climate not being reliable for a continental template to be applied, soon led to a big downturn in cereals. Even until a century or so ago, bread really wasnt much eaten in places like western Ireland and the Scottish Highlands where oats were more reliable and the only significant cereal grown. The only big augment to the diet was the potato, which could grown in these conditions. The diet of milk, butter, potatos, eggs and fish (and whiskey lol) actually was a much healthier diet than the bread based diet of much of Europe. I think if you have that sort of ancestry then bread is really just an addition of the last 2 centuries or so and of course rice, pasta etc are very modern. People of that sort of ancestry have had far far less time to adapt to it than say Med. people who have been eating bread for the last 8 or 9 thousand years. I think sugar and carbs are the main reason for the obesity epidemic IMO. Northern Europeans in particular just are not adapted to that sort of diet where the energy largely goes straight into the blood as sugar.

Joe B
12-07-2013, 04:49 AM
So you ate variable choice of meat food not only beef but others too?

utR!
We ate a typical midwestern diet of beef, pork and chicken. If the fishing was good, walleye, catfish and panfish too. Dad would eat things like pig tails or a fat sandwich as a homage to the wartime diet of his youth. Asking why he was eating that was good for a "you don't know how good you have it" story.

The term "choice meat" just means very good quality graded meat in the states. Prime is considered the best, choice is next and then select. You can learn more about grading from the USDA - What’s Your Beef – Prime, Choice or Select? (http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/01/28/what%E2%80%99s-your-beef-%E2%80%93-prime-choice-or-select/)

utR!
12-08-2013, 06:04 PM
We ate a typical midwestern diet of beef, pork and chicken. If the fishing was good, walleye, catfish and panfish too. Dad would eat things like pig tails or a fat sandwich as a homage to the wartime diet of his youth. Asking why he was eating that was good for a "you don't know how good you have it" story.

The term "choice meat" just means very good quality graded meat in the states. Prime is considered the best, choice is next and then select. You can learn more about grading from the USDA - What’s Your Beef – Prime, Choice or Select? (http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/01/28/what%E2%80%99s-your-beef-%E2%80%93-prime-choice-or-select/)

Jep, meat really taste much softer and juicy eaten at restaurants comparing the meat you do normally buy in the supermarket. Or there is better choise but it costs too much.

Wartime you ate what was available becuse it was hard work and you needed a lot of energy to be able to walk in bad conditions especially wintertime in deep snow. I haven't read yet much about the diet then but it was quite rare they ater red meet or so.

utR!

utR!
12-08-2013, 06:13 PM
I am a believer that some people are much healthier when they stick to mainly stone age type diet of meat, fish, nuts, berries and leaves. A heavily carbohydrate diet was fairly late to arrive in northern Europe and even then the slump in the Neolthic farmers, probably due to the climate not being reliable for a continental template to be applied, soon led to a big downturn in cereals. Even until a century or so ago, bread really wasnt much eaten in places like western Ireland and the Scottish Highlands where oats were more reliable and the only significant cereal grown. The only big augment to the diet was the potato, which could grown in these conditions. The diet of milk, butter, potatos, eggs and fish (and whiskey lol) actually was a much healthier diet than the bread based diet of much of Europe. I think if you have that sort of ancestry then bread is really just an addition of the last 2 centuries or so and of course rice, pasta etc are very modern. People of that sort of ancestry have had far far less time to adapt to it than say Med. people who have been eating bread for the last 8 or 9 thousand years. I think sugar and carbs are the main reason for the obesity epidemic IMO. Northern Europeans in particular just are not adapted to that sort of diet where the energy largely goes straight into the blood as sugar.

Do you know what was the amount of % they ate meat in the stone age?

Yes I think if we have to catch and hunt our food we may thinner and in better condition. It is easy to go to the market and select what ever you like, also those ready made food easily by a car.

As living in a farm it took a lots of afford to raise cattle and earn a living when having only a horse and occasionally men with tractors and combine harvester helping (needed money to that too).

Best

utR!

alan
12-08-2013, 07:12 PM
I dont think I could answer that or generalise, if anyone can, because its such a long period and varied by area so much. Generally speaking temperate European Neolithic farmers had the normal animals - cattle, pig, sheep and goat. The animals were for meat initially where farming was taken up very early in the middle east and southern Europe from c. 9000-6000BC. They also had wheat and barley among other crops but if I recall correctly oats was at that time a weed.

Dairying spread across Europe from NW Turkey into the SE corner in Bulgaria c. 5500BC to as far north as Britian, Ireland and Scandinavia by 4000BC, where the very first farmers have been proven to have been dairying from residue in ancient pots. I understand that the percentage of cattle got bigger when this happened and the age slaughter patterns changed to ones typical of dairying. As far as I understand in ancient conditions the same land could feed 5 times as many people through dairying as the same area of land could from just eating the meat.

I also understand that when the first farmers penetrated into northern Europe c. 4000BC the weather conditions were peak for this area - which means it was a bit sunnier and a little less excessively raining. However after a few centuries the weather declined, became very wet and less sunny so that crop ripening was unreliable and they concentrated more on pastorlism, especially cattle, which actually was ideal in wet conditions in countries covered in grass. They would have probably used a lot of dairy products and some meat.

It was a common practice in northern and mountain Europe to drive the cattle into the hills from early May to late October to use the summer pasture there and live there in huts, then return to their main house in the lowlands from the end of October to the start of May where the lowland pasture would have been saved for use through the winter. The origin of Halloween is partly due to this being the date when they returned to the main house in the lowland.

Pigs appear to have been allowed to roam in the forests with acorns being a major part of their diet. Sheep were probably mainly eaten rather than for wool as they were hairy rather than having a thick fleece suitable for proper wool. Clothes were made from linen from the flax they grew in this period.

That is a very general summary of the Neolithic and it doesnt apply everywhere.

Do you know what was the amount of % they ate meat in the stone age?

Yes I think if we have to catch and hunt our food we may thinner and in better condition. It is easy to go to the market and select what ever you like, also those ready made food easily by a car.

As living in a farm it took a lots of afford to raise cattle and earn a living when having only a horse and occasionally men with tractors and combine harvester helping (needed money to that too).

Best

utR!

AJL
12-08-2013, 10:39 PM
I am a believer that some people are much healthier when they stick to mainly stone age type diet of meat, fish, nuts, berries and leaves.

That would include me. I've traced my HLA-factor haplotype (pertaining to the immune system) on one side as having peak frequency among Bering Island Aleut. While this does not mean I actually descend from Aleuts it is a potential indication that I may be better off with a mix of dairy, proteins, and cold-weather fruits and vegetables rather than heavy grains, which indeed seems to be the case.
Of course HLA is only one of many, many parts of the immune system but since my maternal line also carries a typically Celtic pattern of risk of red hair, hemochromatosis, CF, celiac, and rheumatoid arthritis, I think it is pretty fair to infer that I am better off not eating pasta every day.

utR!
12-17-2013, 03:39 AM
What you think about this?

http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2013/12/extreme-diets-can-quickly-alter-gut-bacteria

Maybe not much new but quite interesting still.

utR!

Joe B
01-11-2014, 02:43 AM
Ancient Greeks Used Portable Grills at Their Picnics

Hruby and Podleski found that the souvlaki trays were too thick to transfer heat when placed over a fire pit, resulting in a pretty raw meal; placing the coals inside the tray was a much more effective cooking method.

"We should probably envision these as portable cooking devices ó perhaps used during Mycenaean picnics," Hruby said.http://i.livescience.com/images/i/000/061/040/iFF/souvlaki-tray.jpg?1389199173
http://www.livescience.com/42414-ancient-cooking-mycenaeans-portable-grills.html#sthash.NiilUuQf.dpuf
Very important research about our love of red meat.

newtoboard
01-11-2014, 02:45 AM
Ancient Greeks Used Portable Grills at Their Picnics
http://i.livescience.com/images/i/000/061/040/iFF/souvlaki-tray.jpg?1389199173
http://www.livescience.com/42414-ancient-cooking-mycenaeans-portable-grills.html#sthash.NiilUuQf.dpuf
Very important research about our love of red meat.
Good find. Souvlaki is delicious.

rhiannon
01-15-2014, 08:22 AM
I'm not really sure. I would usually prefer chicken and fish, but once I was pregnant, it was red meat all the way. I kind of figured it was just maybe needing extra protein for the baby. Most pregnant women supposedly crave ice cream and pickles in the middle of the night, my poor husband had to go out at 4 am for beef jerky. And that was because I was having an intense craving for Venison (deer) jerky! I would also crave milk, would go through a gallon by myself every two days. My husband, poor guy never had any left over for him. Interestingly enough in that time period I also developed a love for grapefruit and grapefruit juice. I would never have consumed them before that.
Some cravings obtained during pregnancy will stay with you. The same happened to me with red meat. Additionally, there are certain aversions that develop during pregnancy that will also stay with you. This has been the case for me with ketchup/catsup or any other sort of sweet relish type sauce; especially on hamburgers. I got pretty sick of it during my first pregnancy some 28yrs ago....and that aversion remains to this day!

I love red meat, but only if its beef or bison. Can't do venison, elk, lamb, mutton, or any of that. Interestingly, I mostly hate bird....unless it's used in lunchmeat. If I make bird at all, I really only tolerate the dark meat. White meat is just dry....and gross!

rms2
01-15-2014, 12:53 PM
I am a latecomer to this thread, but I like meat . . . a lot. I like it all, including goat, but I really like lamb, maybe because I don't get it enough. Now my mouth is watering.

RCO
01-15-2014, 02:12 PM
Worldwide meat production 2010-2012 1222

MikeWhalen
01-15-2014, 03:56 PM
interesting diagram, wish they also gave the per capita numbers
...I had to chuckle when I saw Canada was the only country that significantly eats more pig than any other meat
....Bacon for the win!!!!

Mike



Worldwide meat production 2010-2012 1222

neola
01-16-2014, 02:06 AM
I eat pork, chicken, fish and veggies. I rarely eat beef and other meat.

TŠltos
01-16-2014, 11:13 PM
I am a latecomer to this thread, but I like meat . . . a lot. I like it all, including goat, but I really like lamb, maybe because I don't get it enough. Now my mouth is watering.
A big YES to the lamb here! One of my favorites is roasting a leg of lamb on a rotisserie over my backyard fire pit. Baste with fresh herbs and white wine, now my mouth is watering!

rms2
01-17-2014, 12:51 PM
Yes, lamb is truly delicious. It is easily my favorite.

Ever have curry goat? It's a Caribbean specialty served over rice. It's pretty good.

utR!
01-18-2014, 06:56 AM
The only type of fish I like grilled salmon or maybe fried tilapia. Other fish are too fishy for me. Not a big fan of seafood in general. Lamb and Goat are underrated imo.

Yes I do like salmon fried one and with good spices. Is that tilapia white meat fish?

I have once eaten goat in Gran Canaria but I can not remembert was is it good or just neutral tasty. Should try somewhere once again and get to used to it. :unsure:

utR!

utR!
01-18-2014, 06:58 AM
Worldwide meat production 2010-2012 1222

There are not very many countries in all but shows in overall the biggest meat eaters ;)

utR!

BrettMaximus
01-18-2014, 09:36 AM
Is it not the case that even our teeth are much more like that of herbivores? Not really designed for cutting through and chewing meat?

newtoboard
01-18-2014, 12:20 PM
Yes I do like salmon fried one and with good spices. Is that tilapia white meat fish?

I have once eaten goat in Gran Canaria but I can not remembert was is it good or just neutral tasty. Should try somewhere once again and get to used to it. :unsure:

utR!

Yes tilapia is a white meat fish.

IMO Mexican and Indian cuisines do goat the best.

alan
01-19-2014, 12:46 AM
I think on a cold winters day red meat has a certain something that you dont get from fish. Just a certain comfort factor.

TŠltos
01-19-2014, 05:10 AM
Yes, lamb is truly delicious. It is easily my favorite.

Ever have curry goat? It's a Caribbean specialty served over rice. It's pretty good.
I have never tried that. A new Caribbean restaurant opened where I live and they do serve it. At work we have ordered the Jerk Chicken, and yes so good over rice with cabbage. I didn't expect the cabbage in there, but it's good. Anyway my poor coworker turned every shade of purple from how spicy it is! I will have to give the goat a try sometime. The most exotic type of poultry/meat/fish (outside of sushi) that I have ever tried was Ostrich. That was surprisingly not bad either. :) I won't put venison or rabbit in there for most exotic because it is actually pretty common where I live. The hunting culture is huge.

alan
01-19-2014, 05:27 AM
I have tried goat curry in England in Caribbean street food stalls. When the meat is good (and no corners are being cut using bad meat) goat curry is amazing and the meat is tender and very nice. However in the UK its generally seen outside ethnic food as unusual and people will turn their nose up and what they dont know. I think too because goats are not the most pretty animals people imagine the meat would be tough, sinewy and strong. That doesnt seem to be the reality.

As for Lamb, this is an amazing recipe for roasting a leg of lamb that uses anchovies. That may sound weird but it doesnt end up with fishy lamb - its absolutely wonderful.

http://www.waitrose.com/content/waitrose/en/home/recipes/recipe_directory/h/heston_s_roast_leg_of_lamb.html

ilmari
01-19-2014, 05:44 AM
In my book, lamb is B-A-A-A-d.

Goat is great.

newtoboard
01-19-2014, 01:39 PM
I have tried goat curry in England in Caribbean street food stalls. When the meat is good (and no corners are being cut using bad meat) goat curry is amazing and the meat is tender and very nice. However in the UK its generally seen outside ethnic food as unusual and people will turn their nose up and what they dont know. I think too because goats are not the most pretty animals people imagine the meat would be tough, sinewy and strong. That doesnt seem to be the reality.

As for Lamb, this is an amazing recipe for roasting a leg of lamb that uses anchovies. That may sound weird but it doesnt end up with fishy lamb - its absolutely wonderful.

http://www.waitrose.com/content/waitrose/en/home/recipes/recipe_directory/h/heston_s_roast_leg_of_lamb.html

Goat meat is the exact opposite of tough. It's soft, too soft IMO. Unfortunate because I would love to eat kebabs made of goat meat which I have never seen on a menu.

rms2
01-19-2014, 02:18 PM
I have never tried that. A new Caribbean restaurant opened where I live and they do serve it. At work we have ordered the Jerk Chicken, and yes so good over rice with cabbage. I didn't expect the cabbage in there, but it's good. Anyway my poor coworker turned every shade of purple from how spicy it is! I will have to give the goat a try sometime. The most exotic type of poultry/meat/fish (outside of sushi) that I have ever tried was Ostrich. That was surprisingly not bad either. :) I won't put venison or rabbit in there for most exotic because it is actually pretty common where I live. The hunting culture is huge.

You should try curry goat when you get the chance. It is very good.

Like you, I don't consider venison or rabbit exotic. Here in Virginia, we are overrun with deer and rabbits, so we get all we want of that. My wife makes rabbit stew on a fairly regular basis, as a matter of fact.

authun
01-19-2014, 04:26 PM
I remember one restaurant in the Stubaital in Austria where the speciality was a 'poacher's platter'. Different cuts of red deer and roe deer, wild boar, hare and some sort of poultry, wild mushrooms and various sauces made from wild berries.

Sadly, these gamey meats are too strong for me now but at least we have good farm shops with grass fed pastured beef cattle. I just got myself a couple of highland fillet steaks. Didn't think anything of it until I saw it's brothers looking at me as I walked to the car.

alan
01-21-2014, 07:44 AM
I love game and its become a heck of a lot easier to get boar, venison etc products at reasonable prices - sausages, burgers, steaks etc. I personally dont find game too strong tasting. A lot of people say that who never have eaten game. I also love duck - breast done the Cantonese way can be amazing but its hard to achieve tenderness in duck breast like that at home. What is great value are duck legs. Two legs cost the price of a beer in a pub here. Just do them in a slow cooker for hours until very tender and serve with something with a bit of sweetness for contrast. Another bird that is rarely eaten these days is Goose. We cooked it as the Xmas bird a couple of years ago and it was amazing - almost more like beef than bird.

alan
01-21-2014, 07:55 AM
Has anyone tried the Scottish speciality Haggis? People in Scotland or with Scottish ancestry outside Scotland tend to eat it on Burn's Night which celebrates the Scottish national poet Robert Burns. It falls in about a week's time at the end of January. However, IMO it deserves so much more than to be eaten a couple of times a year. Its very very tasty - a sort of a minced/ground sheep meat and offal concoction mixed with oatmeal and a lot of pepper and seasoning that is boiled in a sheeps stomach or artificial version of one. Traditionally served with mashed potato and mashed Turnip which offsets the dry aspect of the meat and oatmeal in the Haggis. I dont think many people have it regularly but certainly one of the stores here - Marks and Spencers - stocks it all year round all over the UK. Some people dont like the sound of offal so its almost a test of bravery to eat it lol. I am pretty sure though that some of the modern versions dont use that much offal and its more mutton and lamb.

rms2
01-21-2014, 03:47 PM
On my first-ever hunting trip (I was ten) I shot a Canada goose, which my mother kindly and dutifully dressed and cooked. It was delicious. Duck is good, too.

I've never had Haggis, but I'm up for trying it.

BTW, I think Virginia has more Canada geese than people. They are everywhere. It's hard to walk across the grass in a park without stepping in goose turds.

1248

MikeWhalen
01-21-2014, 04:10 PM
Unfortunatly, Canada has too many Canadian geese...they love to invade green spots for food, so my workplace, which is surrounded by nice green fields has the damn things all over...they are a dirty pooping bird and our parking lot is disgusting come fall...unlike our smarter U.S. sister city across the river/border, we do not allow shooting/culling of these friggen beasts so the problem never goes away

But speaking of red meat, I cooked a nice porterhouse steak last night that was outstanding...I did a rub of corse salt, pepper, garlic powder and a bit of cayenne pepper, then coated the steak in a nice olive oil and let it set in the fridge for an hour or so...did a fast hot flash fry, 1 min each side and then another 2.5 min each side at medium heat...the crust I got on that steak had to be one of the best I ever had and it was a really good medium rare-nice pink in middle---this reminded me of why folks love steak

M


On my first-ever hunting trip (I was ten) I shot a Canada goose, which my mother kindly and dutifully dressed and cooked. It was delicious. Duck is good, too.

I've never had Haggis, but I'm up for trying it.

BTW, I think Virginia has more Canada geese than people. They are everywhere. It's hard to walk across the grass in a park without stepping in goose turds.

1248

Mehrdad
01-21-2014, 04:13 PM
I see the Hindus and Buddhists and I think they have the best diets in the world.

rms2
01-21-2014, 04:35 PM
Unfortunatly, Canada has too many Canadian geese...they love to invade green spots for food, so my workplace, which is surrounded by nice green fields has the damn things all over...they are a dirty pooping bird and our parking lot is disgusting come fall...unlike our smarter U.S. sister city across the river/border, we do not allow shooting/culling of these friggen beasts so the problem never goes away

But speaking of red meat, I cooked a nice porterhouse steak last night that was outstanding...I did a rub of corse salt, pepper, garlic powder and a bit of cayenne pepper, then coated the steak in a nice olive oil and let it set in the fridge for an hour or so...did a fast hot flash fry, 1 min each side and then another 2.5 min each side at medium heat...the crust I got on that steak had to be one of the best I ever had and it was a really good medium rare-nice pink in middle---this reminded me of why folks love steak

M

Canada geese are truly everywhere here, too. When you take your kids to the park, they end up rolling in goose sh*t. The geese are quite delicious, though, so goose season is a good opportunity to thin the population a bit and provide yourself with some tasty meat.

That steak sounds good.

Speaking of Canada and things Canadian, it's snowing hard here right now, which is why I am home today (I'm a teacher). It's supposed to snow all day and into the night and maybe tomorrow morning. It's snowing sideways right now (high wind).

MikeWhalen
01-21-2014, 06:36 PM
It is nasty cold up here in the Soo...-31 C....we have an Arctic air mass trapped over us again, and you never felt a bone chilling cold untill you have one of those buggers...there is just something different about the cold that comes directly from the arctic...not sure if its got more humidity or less, but its worse than a similar temperature thats the 'normal' cold

M


Canada geese are truly everywhere here, too. When you take your kids to the park, they end up rolling in goose sh*t. The geese are quite delicious, though, so goose season is a good opportunity to thin the population a bit and provide yourself with some tasty meat.

That steak sounds good.

Speaking of Canada and things Canadian, it's snowing hard here right now, which is why I am home today (I'm a teacher). It's supposed to snow all day and into the night and maybe tomorrow morning. It's snowing sideways right now (high wind).

newtoboard
01-22-2014, 01:41 AM
I'm curious what geese taste like? What about pheasant, quail and dove.

alan
01-22-2014, 03:12 AM
The meat is like Duck more than anything else although tenderer.


I'm curious what geese taste like? What about pheasant, quail and dove.

rms2
01-22-2014, 03:23 AM
It is nasty cold up here in the Soo...-31 C....we have an Arctic air mass trapped over us again, and you never felt a bone chilling cold untill you have one of those buggers...there is just something different about the cold that comes directly from the arctic...not sure if its got more humidity or less, but its worse than a similar temperature thats the 'normal' cold

M

I taught English in Russia back in 2001. It got pretty doggoned cold there, but I was always dressed for it and didn't let myself get caught out in the really bad stuff. The worst part was being dressed for winter and then going in the shops where they would have the heat cranked up, so you would have to strip down and then re-layer up to go back outside; that and getting on the hot Moscow Metro with all those other human beings packed like sardines. Then my sweat would freeze when I got back outside.

I have also been in Chicago in winter, and that seemed as bad as Moscow, if not worse.

Oh, school is closed tomorrow, too, so another day of ease for my youngest daughter Anna and me. Thank God! It's still snowing, and it's supposed to be well below zero Fahrenheit with the wind chill tonight.

Speaking of meat, we went out for an early dinner this evening before things got too bad (but the roads were already pretty bad). We ate at the local Texas Roadhouse restaurant. I had the prime rib and a large glass of Samuel Adams Boston Lager. Then we trudged back out into the snow and went home.

TŠltos
01-22-2014, 04:25 AM
You should try curry goat when you get the chance. It is very good.

Like you, I don't consider venison or rabbit exotic. Here in Virginia, we are overrun with deer and rabbits, so we get all we want of that. My wife makes rabbit stew on a fairly regular basis, as a matter of fact.

Hey I saw in another post in this thread that you are a teacher. Do you guys get off from school for the first day of (firearms) deer season? Up here in PA we do. It is like a state holiday!

TŠltos
01-22-2014, 04:29 AM
Has anyone tried the Scottish speciality Haggis? People in Scotland or with Scottish ancestry outside Scotland tend to eat it on Burn's Night which celebrates the Scottish national poet Robert Burns. It falls in about a week's time at the end of January. However, IMO it deserves so much more than to be eaten a couple of times a year. Its very very tasty - a sort of a minced/ground sheep meat and offal concoction mixed with oatmeal and a lot of pepper and seasoning that is boiled in a sheeps stomach or artificial version of one. Traditionally served with mashed potato and mashed Turnip which offsets the dry aspect of the meat and oatmeal in the Haggis. I dont think many people have it regularly but certainly one of the stores here - Marks and Spencers - stocks it all year round all over the UK. Some people dont like the sound of offal so its almost a test of bravery to eat it lol. I am pretty sure though that some of the modern versions dont use that much offal and its more mutton and lamb.
Is this also known as blood pudding? They have a brown and white version? If so I've had it, and like it. A few years ago though, I liked both. Now I just prefer the white.

MikeWhalen
01-22-2014, 04:34 AM
hey rms2
getting dressed for cold weather, then getting whip sawed by hot stores/malls is a real problem for us winter folks....as you note, it is really irritating, and can be dangerous if you get caught outside again
my city is usually a bit more lucky as we are on the shore of Lake superior and it often protects us against the worst weather as it has its own micro climate...we do get some extra snow sometimes because of it, but normally we win

that sounds like a tasty supper, gotta like the sam adams beer!

Mike


I taught English in Russia back in 2001. It got pretty doggoned cold there, but I was always dressed for it and didn't let myself get caught out in the really bad stuff. The worst part was being dressed for winter and then going in the shops where they would have the heat cranked up, so you would have to strip down and then re-layer up to go back outside; that and getting on the hot Moscow Metro with all those other human beings packed like sardines. Then my sweat would freeze when I got back outside.

I have also been in Chicago in winter, and that seemed as bad as Moscow, if not worse.

Oh, school is closed tomorrow, too, so another day of ease for my youngest daughter Anna and me. Thank God! It's still snowing, and it's supposed to be well below zero Fahrenheit with the wind chill tonight.

Speaking of meat, we went out for an early dinner this evening before things got too bad (but the roads were already pretty bad). We ate at the local Texas Roadhouse restaurant. I had the prime rib and a large glass of Samuel Adams Boston Lager. Then we trudged back out into the snow and went home.

TŠltos
01-22-2014, 04:34 AM
Unfortunatly, Canada has too many Canadian geese...they love to invade green spots for food, so my workplace, which is surrounded by nice green fields has the damn things all over...they are a dirty pooping bird and our parking lot is disgusting come fall...unlike our smarter U.S. sister city across the river/border, we do not allow shooting/culling of these friggen beasts so the problem never goes away

But speaking of red meat, I cooked a nice porterhouse steak last night that was outstanding...I did a rub of corse salt, pepper, garlic powder and a bit of cayenne pepper, then coated the steak in a nice olive oil and let it set in the fridge for an hour or so...did a fast hot flash fry, 1 min each side and then another 2.5 min each side at medium heat...the crust I got on that steak had to be one of the best I ever had and it was a really good medium rare-nice pink in middle---this reminded me of why folks love steak

M
That steak sounds dee-lish! Don't know if you ever had Hanger steak, that is my favorite. My husband makes it with just salt and pepper, olive oil in an iron skillet. It is amazing!

TŠltos
01-22-2014, 04:45 AM
I taught English in Russia back in 2001. It got pretty doggoned cold there, but I was always dressed for it and didn't let myself get caught out in the really bad stuff. The worst part was being dressed for winter and then going in the shops where they would have the heat cranked up, so you would have to strip down and then re-layer up to go back outside; that and getting on the hot Moscow Metro with all those other human beings packed like sardines. Then my sweat would freeze when I got back outside.

I have also been in Chicago in winter, and that seemed as bad as Moscow, if not worse.

Oh, school is closed tomorrow, too, so another day of ease for my youngest daughter Anna and me. Thank God! It's still snowing, and it's supposed to be well below zero Fahrenheit with the wind chill tonight.

Speaking of meat, we went out for an early dinner this evening before things got too bad (but the roads were already pretty bad). We ate at the local Texas Roadhouse restaurant. I had the prime rib and a large glass of Samuel Adams Boston Lager. Then we trudged back out into the snow and went home.
We're under a wind chill advisory here. Supposed to get down to negative 24, help! So far only a two hour delay for the schools. I'm sure they will be closed by morning. Your prime rib and Sam Adams sounds like a good combo. It was chili for me tonight, pun intended!

alan
01-22-2014, 08:10 AM
The winter on this side of the pond has been mild but very wet and with an very unusual amount of high winds most of the time over the last couple of months. My vegetable plot's early onions are already well up because of the mild weather which is great as long as there is not a late cold snap - that would kill them off. We had a few years of cold winters and white Xmases in the late 0s. I kind of liked that cold but dry weather though. The worst weather (which is common in winter in the isles) is about 1 or 2 degrees but damp and wet. That goes right to your bones in a way that much colder but dryer weather doesnt.

newtoboard
01-22-2014, 05:18 PM
The meat is like Duck more than anything else although tenderer.

I've never eaten duck. What are some good duck dishes besides Peking duck or pate?

Mehrdad
01-22-2014, 05:42 PM
I've had duck curry, it was really good and tasty.

Goat curry is awesome too, I love sheep palao that my grandfather used to cook all the time.

newtoboard
01-22-2014, 05:46 PM
I've had duck curry, it was really good and tasty.

Goat curry is awesome too, I love sheep palao that my grandfather used to cook all the time.

Yea. I love pulao especially the variant that is stronger on cinnamon/warmer spices.

Mehrdad
01-22-2014, 06:23 PM
So here's a question, why is it always the men that make pulao? Is it a cultural thing? I was never raised in South Asia, so I do not know much about things, but my father and grandfather were the ones that made pulao, never saw the ladies make it.

rms2
01-22-2014, 08:36 PM
I wasn't familiar with the term pulao, but I see that it is a kind of rice pilaf, Russian пилав, which my wife pronounces like "plaf". Among the Russians I know, and I know many, the women make it, usually with chicken or beef. It is delicious. I would like to try it with mutton, though. That would be even better, I think.

I like the way Russians socialize: lots of food punctuated by periodic shots of vodka. :)

newtoboard
01-22-2014, 09:01 PM
I wasn't familiar with the term pulao, but I see that it is a kind of rice pilaf, Russian пилав, which my wife pronounces like "plaf". Among the Russians I know, and I know many, the women make it, usually with chicken or beef. It is delicious. I would like to try it with mutton, though. That would be even better, I think.

I like the way Russians socialize: lots of food punctuated by periodic shots of vodka. :)

I thought Russians called it plov. They inherited it from Central Asia. But it's probably an ancient dish of South Central Asia. I think Alexander was said to have come across it in Bactria.

DMXX
01-23-2014, 01:37 PM
One Persian word for a rice-based dish is "poloh", so not far off those terms.

utR!
01-23-2014, 07:20 PM
Joe B. That grill is somehow simle and who knows easy to do comparing nowaday's massive grills. :)

And it also kept the heat longer I suppose so.

utR!

utR!
01-23-2014, 07:27 PM
Has anyone tried the Scottish speciality Haggis? People in Scotland or with Scottish ancestry outside Scotland tend to eat it on Burn's Night which celebrates the Scottish national poet Robert Burns. It falls in about a week's time at the end of January. However, IMO it deserves so much more than to be eaten a couple of times a year. Its very very tasty - a sort of a minced/ground sheep meat and offal concoction mixed with oatmeal and a lot of pepper and seasoning that is boiled in a sheeps stomach or artificial version of one. Traditionally served with mashed potato and mashed Turnip which offsets the dry aspect of the meat and oatmeal in the Haggis. I dont think many people have it regularly but certainly one of the stores here - Marks and Spencers - stocks it all year round all over the UK. Some people dont like the sound of offal so its almost a test of bravery to eat it lol. I am pretty sure though that some of the modern versions dont use that much offal and its more mutton and lamb.

I have heard of it but never eaten. One day I would like to visit Scotland but it is just a hope in futher future.

Are there any other special meet foods in Scotland?

best

utR!

icebreaker
01-23-2014, 07:57 PM
Now I'm thinking about it; I eat every day at least once meat. Mostly red meat: lamb, kavurma, kŲfte, hamburgers, pastirma, turkish bacon "sucuk". After two or three days with red meat I try to eat fish such as anchovy, salmon, mackerel or bonito. Chicken breast with tomato sauce is also one of my favourites. I like wings during a bbq. However I'm enjoying vegetable dishes like russian salad, belgian fries, beans, spinach or aubergine with yogurt, I don't consider them as "real" food.

I don't know if its true but I heard people with the blood type 0 digest meat better than other. I'm 0 RH+ so I guess I'm lucky.

MikeWhalen
01-23-2014, 10:22 PM
my moms side of the family is from Newfoundland, and every summer, at my Aunts cottage on Lake Superior, there would be a family gathering for a 'famous', or perhaps i should say, 'infamous' Newfie dish called 'fish and brewsis'
...it was the most vile smelling thing any of us had ever smelled and all us kids were terrified some deranged adult would try to make us eat some, I will paste a link to the recipe, I think its fairly authentic, just so you know whats involved...I do remember that the 'hard bread' is really supposed to be the old navy style 'hardtack' and evidently there was only 1 shop in toronto that stocked in all of central Canada

http://www.food.com/recipe/fish-and-brewis-75738

Mike

ps-us kids and any adult that was still sane were able to get good old bbq's hotdogs and hamburgers

rms2
01-24-2014, 12:30 PM
I thought Russians called it plov. They inherited it from Central Asia. But it's probably an ancient dish of South Central Asia. I think Alexander was said to have come across it in Bactria.

They spell it пилав, which is pilav, but my wife, who is from Volgograd, pronounces it as plaf, and so does every other Russian I have ever heard say the word. You don't hear the i at all and the v at the end sounds like an f.

newtoboard
01-24-2014, 02:12 PM
So here's a question, why is it always the men that make pulao? Is it a cultural thing? I was never raised in South Asia, so I do not know much about things, but my father and grandfather were the ones that made pulao, never saw the ladies make it.

This is not a rule in South Asian households. I know among Central Asians and Russians men cook it but not among South Asian households.

authun
01-24-2014, 04:40 PM
Has anyone tried the Scottish speciality Haggis?

I'm having some tonight. Most of the butchers at the farmers markets around here sell it. They're branded though, not home made, usually MacSween's (http://www.macsween.co.uk/)

There is a very similar dish from Lower Saxony in Northern Germany called Knipp or Pfannenschlag

1274

authun
01-24-2014, 04:42 PM
or with bread

authun
01-24-2014, 04:54 PM
Are there any other special meet foods in Scotland?


The Angus is bred for beef, as opposed for dairy and the original Aberdeen Angus is very good but it is often intensively reared thesedays and the taste is lost. Scottish longhorn is also good.

Scotland is famous for seafood. Even in Spain a paella likely has seafood from Scotland but particularly good are the Arbroath Smokies. No other smoked haddock tastes like it.

AJL
01-24-2014, 06:41 PM
I'm having some tonight. Most of the butchers at the farmers markets around here sell it. They're branded though, not home made, usually

I am too, with neeps and tatties -- a local butcher here makes his own. There's even a Scottish butchers in Toronto (http://allensscottish.foodpages.ca/).

You can also get Stahly's haggis-in-a-can here, both in the original lamb and a vegetarian variety.

authun
01-25-2014, 08:28 PM
Haggis Making:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F84oqt_gqR4

AJL
01-25-2014, 09:03 PM
Full of delicious minerals (copper, selenium, iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, Vitamins A, B3, B6, B12, etc.). The suet seems to be the only non-healthy part of it.

There's an analogue in Eastern European cuisine, kishka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kishka_(food)).

thetick
01-26-2014, 01:34 AM
I grew up with scrapple. My grandfather was a butcher so we always had lots of scrapple. It always tasted great. He also told us never ever buy scrapple, because you have no idea what some people put in to it.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple

utR!
01-27-2014, 04:40 PM
Haggis Making:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F84oqt_gqR4

That was a good video. I have done once sausages to an intestine (natural). But I think I could not slaughter an animal :eek:

utR!

thetick
01-28-2014, 05:14 AM
I have done once sausages to an intestine (natural).

That's reminds me when I was about 5 years old I was playing with the dog outside my grandfather's butcher house. Then my grandfather ran out of the butcher house with a meat cleaver chasing my uncle (was always the trouble maker) screaming if you don't have enough intestines you stop making sausage!!

Apparently that uncle bought plastic casings and tried to sneak them in to make more sausages. This also explains why there was always more scrapple to eat than sausage.

rossa
01-28-2014, 06:01 PM
I have heard of it but never eaten. One day I would like to visit Scotland but it is just a hope in futher future.

Are there any other special meet foods in Scotland?

best

utR!

I don't trust the cuisine of a nation that deep fat fries battered mars bars, sometime they even eat them with ketchup. They get a pass on Irn Bru though.

thetick
02-01-2014, 03:38 PM
I don't trust the cuisine of a nation that deep fat fries battered mars bars, sometime they even eat them with ketchup. They get a pass on Irn Bru though.

British food is so bad to compete in NYC this British owned restaurant will fry any food... even whatever you bring in!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chxzSIAWA2g

AJL
02-01-2014, 08:25 PM
I dunno, we have our share of questionable cuisine indigenous to North America too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7D4RCSpo3w

newtoboard
02-01-2014, 08:26 PM
I dunno, we have our share of questionable cuisine indigenous to North America too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7D4RCSpo3w

But we also have awesome things like pig candy to balance these things out.

Joe B
02-01-2014, 09:05 PM
I dunno, we have our share of questionable cuisine indigenous to North America too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7D4RCSpo3w

In defense of Far North America, also known as Canada, you do deep fat fry some good stuff too.
Walleye Shore Lunch
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsrm_2p9QIM

Walleye
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walleye

AJL
02-01-2014, 09:27 PM
In defense of Far North America, also known as Canada, you do deep fat fry some good stuff too.

I am a fan of that. Also in the oily department:

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/01/27/la-poutine-week-2014_n_4674014.html

ilmari
02-01-2014, 10:19 PM
I am a fan of that. Also in the oily department:

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2014/01/27/la-poutine-week-2014_n_4674014.html

I love poutine.

That reminds me of a meme on facebook the other day that was about the -3į C temperature and snow where the folks in Atlanta were getting into horrible automobile pile-ups on the roads and the Canadians living in Georgia woke up and mistakenly went out to get poutine.

ilmari
02-02-2014, 07:37 AM
Sorry to keep going off of the original topic, but it's hard to make Poutine here, we can only buy cheese curds AT the Tillamook Cheese factory, they don't sell them in any other retail establishment, and that makes it a 180+ mile round trip.

utR!
02-02-2014, 03:04 PM
Back to read meat? Is it dangerous for your health and how much is too much eatern/week?

utR!

:focus:

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 05:05 PM
Back to read meat? Is it dangerous for your health and how much is too much eatern/week?

utR!

:focus:

Yea there is an elevated cancer risk with red meat although I suspect the nitrates used in sausages and cold cuts plays a large role and red meat items without nitrates are healthier.

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 05:06 PM
Also what's everybody eating for the big game today?

utR!
02-02-2014, 05:55 PM
Also what's everybody eating for the big game today?

Yes eating may be a game, I had some rice and take away chinese chicken, mushrooms and bambo shoots and some salad. It is so rare I do eat take away meals but this was a huge portion (lasted 2 days) Nam ja nam.

utR!

AJL
02-02-2014, 06:01 PM
Yea there is an elevated cancer risk with red meat although I suspect the nitrates used in sausages and cold cuts plays a large role and red meat items without nitrates are healthier.

There is some health concern as well over the cooking of some meats, especially those with high added nitrogen content e.g. bacon:

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w00/nitrosamine.html

Joe B
02-02-2014, 06:05 PM
Yes eating may be a game, I had some rice and take away chinese chicken, mushrooms and bambo shoots and some salad. It is so rare I do eat take away meals but this was a huge portion (lasted 2 days) Nam ja nam.

utR!"Big game" means deer, elk, moose, bear and other large wild critters. Many of which live in Finland! You will hear the term "wild game" too. I sure can understand why that does not translate well.
Game (food)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_(food)
critters - animals

evon
02-02-2014, 06:47 PM
I hardly eat red meat (maybe once a year?), i do eat allot of white meat (Pork, Turkey, Chicken) though and fish (Salmon, Mackerel, Herring). But i dont think i am the norm here..

MikeWhalen
02-02-2014, 07:02 PM
actually, I'm pretty sure Newtoboard is talking about the Superbowl today-some say it is the most watched single event in the world!
-as a reminder to some, its North American style football!!

I am hosting a small party at my place for the game as I have an 80 inch TV and a 7.1 surround sound system
-My big brother is slow cooking a mess of ribs for 5 hours with a classic BBQ sauce, we will broil them for the last half hour (the bbq is normally used in the winter, but we have had so much snow and it is so bitter cold here, we will pass on that chore)
-one of my buddies will be picking up several pounds of one of the best chicken wings in town...half will be of medium heat, the other is sweet and sour
-I will be broiling (now here is the healthy part) some all natural, no hormone injected ect. 'ballpark' hotdogs with all the fixings
-not sure what my nephew (the genuine chef) will bring...last year it was a yummy cheese con queso dip
-of course, there will be lots of chips and snacks as well

it will be a great day in the Whalen household!!

Mike




Also what's everybody eating for the big game today?

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 07:02 PM
I hardly eat red meat (maybe once a year?), i do eat allot of white meat (Pork, Turkey, Chicken) though and fish (Salmon, Mackerel, Herring). But i dont think i am the norm here..

Pretty sure pork is a red meat.

Silesian
02-02-2014, 07:38 PM
I hardly eat red meat (maybe once a year?), i do eat allot of white meat (Pork, Turkey, Chicken) though and fish (Salmon, Mackerel, Herring). But i dont think i am the norm here..
I use to eat a lot of Knockwurst, but not anymore to much oil. I'm similar to your taste, when Norwegian salmon goes on sale I try to stock up. My favorite barbecued Norwegian salmon/butter/lemon/light salt, with a liter of 3.8% whole organic milk.

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 07:59 PM
Also what's up with Scottish cuisine? They apparently produce some of the highest quality fish, lamb, vegetables and fruits in Europe but I've read the bulk of these food items end up being exported to Southern Europe while the Scots end up eating a very unhealthy diet with an emphasis on fried foods.

Joe B
02-02-2014, 08:29 PM
:beerchug:
actually, I'm pretty sure Newtoboard is talking about the Superbowl today-some say it is the most watched single event in the world!
-as a reminder to some, its North American style football!!

I am hosting a small party at my place for the game as I have an 80 inch TV and a 7.1 surround sound system
-My big brother is slow cooking a mess of ribs for 5 hours with a classic BBQ sauce, we will broil them for the last half hour (the bbq is normally used in the winter, but we have had so much snow and it is so bitter cold here, we will pass on that chore)
-one of my buddies will be picking up several pounds of one of the best chicken wings in town...half will be of medium heat, the other is sweet and sour
-I will be broiling (now here is the healthy part) some all natural, no hormone injected ect. 'ballpark' hotdogs with all the fixings
-not sure what my nephew (the genuine chef) will bring...last year it was a yummy cheese con queso dip
-of course, there will be lots of chips and snacks as well

it will be a great day in the Whalen household!!

Mike
Boy, that was dumb on my part. Of course it's "game day" food. We're loaded up with bratwurst. Beer and Brats!

Mike,
That sounds like a pretty good spread.

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 08:43 PM
:beerchug:
Boy, that was dumb on my part. Of course it's game day food. We're loaded up with bratwurst. Beer and Brats!

Well I guess in your defense the people in California likely don't have much to be excited about this year. :biggrin1:

Joe B
02-02-2014, 08:48 PM
Well I guess in your defense the people in California likely don't have much to be excited about this year. :biggrin1:
Oh, it's much worse for me. I'm a long time Vikings fan.:behindsofa:

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 08:49 PM
Oh, it's much worse for me. I'm a long time Vikings fan.

Oh ouch. You have my sympathies.

evon
02-02-2014, 09:43 PM
Pretty sure pork is a red meat.

Nope, red meat is larger animals, such as cattle and so on.


I use to eat a lot of Knockwurst, but not anymore to much oil. I'm similar to your taste, when Norwegian salmon goes on sale I try to stock up. My favorite barbecued Norwegian salmon/butter/lemon/light salt, with a liter of 3.8% whole organic milk.

3.8%, wow, i only drink 0.5% :D the fattest i could drink would be around 1,5%, but i cant take much of it, as i get sick from the creaminess.

newtoboard
02-02-2014, 10:35 PM
Nope, red meat is larger animals, such as cattle and so on.



3.8%, wow, i only drink 0.5% :D the fattest i could drink would be around 1,5%, but i cant take much of it, as i get sick from the creaminess.

Whether meat is red or not is determined by if it is red or not when uncooked.

MikeWhalen
02-03-2014, 03:22 AM
-wings were delish!
-bro's ribs needed another hour and a much better sauce...(here's a tip, dont try out a new recipe on the batch of ribs you are bringing over for the boys on superbowl, ffs!)
-tater's were pretty good, especially with ranch dip
-the rye was premium
-the beer was Bud crown and quite tasty
-no one had room to bother cooking the dogs

-game sucked badly, even though my team won
-I dont think there was one commercial that featured a scantily clad beauty-Booooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
-funniest commercial was the doberman/chiwawa hybrid one
-lamest commercial-several were tied for pretentious crap, pretending to be meaningful, philosophical and significant when they were just flogging cars...ffs!
-half time show...the only thing worse would have been Justin Beeber-ffs!!!

all in all, very good company, pretty good food, real good booze, sad game, limp commercials

M

rms2
02-04-2014, 12:12 PM
I don't like either team, although I liked Peyton Manning when he was with Indianapolis, and my dad's older sister, my Aunt Lois, knew Peyton Manning's dad, Archie Manning. Anyway, we went out to eat at the Golden Corral, where I enjoyed the roast beef (speaking of red meat). The crowd was light: everyone was home watching the Super Bowl.

utR!
02-04-2014, 06:16 PM
Okei, yes we have I think on word for big game, iso riista. I have eaten deer, reindeer and maybe a bit elk (mixed with other game) in Lappland once. But if you have eaten only once some of them, you have not so good idea how they tasted. I would like to try to eat bear one day, but that is a rare food only for maybe rich people and those hunters who sell the meat in auctions.

utR!



"Big game" means deer, elk, moose, bear and other large wild critters. Many of which live in Finland! You will hear the term "wild game" too. I sure can understand why that does not translate well.
Game (food)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_(food)
critters - animals

TŠltos
02-05-2014, 04:37 AM
Nope, red meat is larger animals, such as cattle and so on.



3.8%, wow, i only drink 0.5% :D the fattest i could drink would be around 1,5%, but i cant take much of it, as i get sick from the creaminess.
I can remember a commercial here in the States a few years ago referring to pork as "the other white meat". Yep when you cook it up and slice it pork is white. I will let you guys know my secret to BBQ spare ribs that are soooo good. I use country style ribs, the key is to boil them for 20 minutes before you put them in the oven covered in your favorite BBQ sauce.

ilmari
02-05-2014, 09:09 AM
Okei, yes we have I think on word for big game, iso riista. I have eaten deer, reindeer and maybe a bit elk (mixed with other game) in Lappland once. But if you have eaten only once some of them, you have not so good idea how they tasted. I would like to try to eat bear one day, but that is a rare food only for maybe rich people and those hunters who sell the meat in auctions.

utR!
I promise you, you don't want to eat bear, it is so strong tasting and very chewy. Never again for me.

Gray Fox
02-05-2014, 09:17 AM
Every February we have a wild game banquet in my town hosted by a non-denominational Christian church.. Anyways, I have so far eaten Alligator, Camel, Wild boar, Lion, Beaver and a few others I can't remember. Alligator was by far the best, kind of a fishy-chicken taste. Camel was okay, a bit dull. The Boar was delicious as well. I can't remember what the Lion tasted like nor the Beaver.

Definitely gonna try to go this year. I'll report back if I do.

utR!
02-06-2014, 04:28 PM
I promise you, you don't want to eat bear, it is so strong tasting and very chewy. Never again for me.

I see Ilmari, I believe it is so. ;)

Have anybody else eaten bear?

utR!

- - - Updated - - -

Hi Sam_Isaack,

You have eaten a various selection different rare animals like lion. I just wonder where they managed to get lion meat, is it legal to kill lions I have no good idea?

Alligator sound exotic meat was it red too?

best

utR!




Every February we have a wild game banquet in my town hosted by a non-denominational Christian church.. Anyways, I have so far eaten Alligator, Camel, Wild boar, Lion, Beaver and a few others I can't remember. Alligator was by far the best, kind of a fishy-chicken taste. Camel was okay, a bit dull. The Boar was delicious as well. I can't remember what the Lion tasted like nor the Beaver.

Definitely gonna try to go this year. I'll report back if I do.

nazarov
02-06-2014, 05:26 PM
i don't eat much of red meat ... i prefer fish, chicken, lamb ... especially lamb ... we prepare a traditional asian dish made of rice and lamb ... when i'm in the steppe in summer time i gladly taste what my friends offer ... even mormots of the steppe ... like them ... and off course ... much of fish and Caspian sturgeon ...

rms2
02-06-2014, 07:35 PM
Lamb is a red meat, isn't it?

Isn't red meat any meat that is red when raw?

I tend to think of red meat as pretty much any meat except poultry and fish.

Joe B
02-06-2014, 08:32 PM
Lamb is a red meat, isn't it?

Isn't red meat any meat that is red when raw?

I tend to think of red meat as pretty much any meat except poultry and fish.
My understanding is that any mammal is technically red meat. That being said, often it goes by color. Veal is often called white meat. Yet we know that mommy and daddy bovine were red meat. It's all good!

Gray Fox
02-07-2014, 07:46 PM
I see Ilmari, I believe it is so. ;)

Have anybody else eaten bear?

utR!

- - - Updated - - -

Hi Sam_Isaack,

You have eaten a various selection different rare animals like lion. I just wonder where they managed to get lion meat, is it legal to kill lions I have no good idea?

Alligator sound exotic meat was it red too?

best

utR!

I'm not entirely sure how they acquired the Lion meat. I didn't bother to ask. There were so many odd things to sample, I just kind of dove in and went with it! The gator meat was white. It was kind of like gator-McNuggets, the way they deep-fried it and all. Reindeer was another meat available at the event. I don't really remember it being all that distinct from regular venison.

Loki
02-09-2014, 09:51 AM
Beef is my favourite by far. But, being from South Africa, I've eaten hippopotamus, elephant, buffalo, giraffe, springbok, impala, ostrich and others.

MikeWhalen
02-09-2014, 03:53 PM
fascinating Loki, up here in Canada, I've only seen those animals in wildlife documentaries...could you tell us, difficult as it might be, what each of those exotic meats taste like? ie hippo is like fishy pork (just a wild example)?

thanks

Mike

Loki
02-10-2014, 08:32 PM
fascinating Loki, up here in Canada, I've only seen those animals in wildlife documentaries...could you tell us, difficult as it might be, what each of those exotic meats taste like? ie hippo is like fishy pork (just a wild example)?

thanks

Mike

None of them taste like pork, more like beef. But not as nice as beef ... they all have different flavours, but a bit "off" ... I guess they're an acquired taste. We usually get those meats in the form of biltong.

utR!
02-14-2014, 03:31 PM
Beef is my favourite by far. But, being from South Africa, I've eaten hippopotamus, elephant, buffalo, giraffe, springbok, impala, ostrich and others.

What a repertoire. How about giraffe, what kind of meat is it, soft meat or so?

utR!

utR!
02-14-2014, 03:35 PM
I'm not entirely sure how they acquired the Lion meat. I didn't bother to ask. There were so many odd things to sample, I just kind of dove in and went with it! The gator meat was white. It was kind of like gator-McNuggets, the way they deep-fried it and all. Reindeer was another meat available at the event. I don't really remember it being all that distinct from regular venison.

Ok. Reindeer is quite dry meat and it needs crease better butter with it and tradiotionaly eaten with smashed potatoes. But reindeer is done in many other ways too depends on what kind of part it is.

utR!

Gray Fox
02-16-2014, 01:50 AM
None of them taste like pork, more like beef. But not as nice as beef ... they all have different flavours, but a bit "off" ... I guess they're an acquired taste. We usually get those meats in the form of biltong.

I have to agree with that. Most exotic animals do have a flavor similar to beef. I went to the Wild game banquet this evening and it didn't live up to the last time. The menu items were pretty basic. Venison was the main menu item featured in at least three different dishes. Don't get me wrong, I like deer meat, but I eat it fairly regular. The most exotic item this year was Antelope and Alpaca. As I've said most exotic meat seems to have a beef flavor to it and these two animals weren't an exception. One of the highlights was the road-kill dish, which is opossum and I believe squirrel. That was pretty good. It had a pretty strong chicken taste going on. Wildcat/Bobcat was the mystery stew. It was more of a beef flavor. Again, pretty good. The alligator was there again too. Not much different in its presentation, but it was seasoned a bit more heavily this time out.

All in all, a decent evening. Though a nice cold Beer, preferably a Sam Smith's Chocolate Stout, would've made things more enjoyable!

Loki
03-01-2014, 07:16 PM
What a repertoire. How about giraffe, what kind of meat is it, soft meat or so?

utR!

It's red meat similar to beef.

utR!
03-30-2014, 06:27 PM
How about eating raw meat. Like red inside owen roast meat. Honestly I can not can it be healthy to eat meat like that?

:fear:

utR1

MikeWhalen
03-30-2014, 08:39 PM
thats an interesting question Utr and I have wondered about that
...on the one hand, they always say to cook any meat to at least 'x' degree, to kill any nasty bacteria and such, yet some meat is purposely served raw such as 'Steak Tartar" by reputable high end restaurants
...so do they do some trick in preparation or is there some other science rules that make it ok?

Mike

Joe B
03-30-2014, 09:17 PM
How about eating raw meat. Like red inside owen roast meat. Honestly I can not can it be healthy to eat meat like that?

:fear:

utR1That or on the grill. Ground beef is best served done and not bloody, unless you know the source really well. Steak is different! The inside of a properly cut nice thick juicy steak has not had the chance to be contaminated by bacteria. Just char that baby on the outside and let it bleed. It's okay by me if you hear that steak moo just a little when you stick that fork into it.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2a/US_Beef_cuts.svg/500px-US_Beef_cuts.svg.png

TŠltos
03-31-2014, 03:49 AM
That or on the grill. Ground beef is best served done and not bloody, unless you know the source really well. Steak is different! The inside of a properly cut nice thick juicy steak has not had the chance to be contaminated by bacteria. Just char that baby on the outside and let it bleed. It's okay by me if hear that steak moo just a little when you stick that fork into it.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2a/US_Beef_cuts.svg/500px-US_Beef_cuts.svg.png
MOOOO! Yes on the grill little rare, with a glass of that Pinot Noir is not too bad!

EDIT-BTW I can't remember, and I'm too lazy to go back and read this whole thread again after having to work too many long hours today. Have I mentioned just how awesome hanger steak is?! :hungry:

utR!
03-31-2014, 06:20 PM
That or on the grill. Ground beef is best served done and not bloody, unless you know the source really well. Steak is different! The inside of a properly cut nice thick juicy steak has not had the chance to be contaminated by bacteria. Just char that baby on the outside and let it bleed. It's okay by me if you hear that steak moo just a little when you stick that fork into it.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2a/US_Beef_cuts.svg/500px-US_Beef_cuts.svg.png

Once I have eaten quite raw redish steak and it was quite good but it was in Russian restaurant in Helsinki. It was served on the wood long service dish with soft whole carlics nice and expensive. I do like steak when it is no dry.

But the owen roast meat is often too dry. I'm not sure of meat probe.

You seem to know quite a lot of meat. :)

Best utR!

Mamluk
04-02-2014, 04:30 AM
thats an interesting question Utr and I have wondered about that
...on the one hand, they always say to cook any meat to at least 'x' degree, to kill any nasty bacteria and such, yet some meat is purposely served raw such as 'Steak Tartar" by reputable high end restaurants
...so do they do some trick in preparation or is there some other science rules that make it ok?

Mike

Eating raw meat is risky, you just have to trust the meat source I guess, and as with all cooking maintain impeccable hygiene in your kitchen. Obviously you should never consume raw poultry. Beef and lamb are usually deemed safe. In my family we have (had) a tradition of eating an Eastern Mediterranean version of steak tartare (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%87i%C4%9F_k%C3%B6fte)... and we used to prepare it ourselves. The key is to choose the finest cuts of beef (or lamb), preferably a tenderloin, or another cut that has very little fat and tendons. Western steak tartare is usually coarsely chopped, but in this eastern version the meat has to be minced as fine as your knife can go. And then it is mixed with bulghur wheat, minced scallions, spices and herbs for taste. After it's arranged pretty in a plate, one would break off a piece of pita bread and scoop up a morsel of the meat with it.

I used to make my own pasterma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastirma), which is the progenitor of pastrami, from tenderloin as well.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
But I don't think I'll be doing much of all that anymore. Despite coming from a very carnivorous family, I've spent the past couple of years weaning myself off of all kinds of meat, and I will admit it has been a challenge. My great-uncle was a butcher, and my Dad used to work at his shop when he was a teenager. My relatives are a bit peeved with me because I am the self-imposed anomaly at the dining table. I used to buy massive quantities of meat (mostly lamb, and then beef) on a weekly basis--I used to take pleasure in buying lamb legs for carving out pieces of kabobs (and separating out the fascia from muscle, and deciding which layers of fat were deemed worthy of remaining and which had to be discarded), that I would apportion into Ziploc bags for marinating or freezing. Now I've become somewhat averse to that. I loved throwing some kielbasa on the grill and waiting for the skin to burst open, then the grease oozes out and drips onto the coals below, feeding the flames. I can still make a damn-good pot roast, braised leg of lamb, BBQ brisket, Mexican barbacoa, corned beef and cabbage, and shish kabobs though... but I try not to, because the temptation to eat it is so hard to resist.

I could go for weeks without eating any meat, and if I'm in a diner that's serving open-faced Reubens, I break down and order a dish, and then I feel remorseful afterwards (just a little :\ ).

I watched a documentary and read articles about centenarians, mainly from Mediterranean islands (Sardinia, Sicily, Corsica) and the Japanese islands, and why they live so long, and it inspired me to try to follow their diets. I realize genetics plays an important role, but so does environment (which includes diet, psychological well-being, and lifestyle). They all have diets high in plant sources, low in meat sources (except fish).

Ordering meat in a restaurant where it is served to you on a shiny plate, or buying meat in a grocery store where it is wrapped in plastic or wax paper, and arranged neatly in rows, is different then killing the animal yourself and preparing the meat for your consumption. When I was five years old my grandfather ordered a lamb to be brought to his house, and he kept it in a corner in his garden. I was in charge of bringing it vegetable and fruit scraps. Some weeks later it was slaughtered, and the lamb wasn't there anymore. I guess I was desensitized to such things afterwards. But then family tradition (and religion and culture) dictates that when my children were born that I sacrifice rams at the birth of each child (2 rams for a boy, and 1 ram for a girl). And that is what I did for each... I took the knife, recited a quick prayer, and took the life of those creatures. And a butcher would come, string up the animal, skin it, gut it, and systematically slice off the appendages and parts. A third of the meat was distributed to the poor in charity, another third was to be given to friends and relatives, and the last third was for my own family.

Later on that got me thinking about slaughtering animals. I think that if I had to do that myself every time I wanted to put meat in my freezer or oven, that I would actually consume less meat. I've gotten a bit too philosophical and sentimental lately in regards to slaughtering animals for meat consumption, especially when we have good access to plant sources. Maybe regions where there was historically poor agriculture, due to climate and terrain, had populations that consumed more meat and animal products (like the Eurasian steppe), while fertile regions in more temperate or tropical climes had populations that did not require as much meat and so therefore were content with plant sources (India?). (As a side note, that's why I think pickles, jams & preserves, meats, milk & cheeses, butter, and dried foods are common in the diets of people from places with long winters; because they needed those to survive. In places like south India and southeast Asia where the growing season lasts all year long, they did not have to develop those types of foods--rather they kept on working the land and had a continuous harvest all year long (like with rice), instead of once a year at the end of summer.)

I've labeled myself a "hypocritical vegetarian." I try to stick with fruits and vegetables, but once in a while I'll sneak a bite of one of my children's scrumptious hamburgers. My situation is kind of like Vampire Lestat's (in Anne Rice's novel).

utR!
04-05-2014, 05:45 PM
You wrote quite a lot about what you have eaten and your traditions. How often we do think about food (in this case meat) philosophically or sentimental way. We just eat what we like or sometimes it is matter of how much it cost. Is it "whatever" thinking when it is talked about our health?

Can we change our eating habits at least when we face to news of cancer, surgery (perhaps a stoma)? It's not only meat which may cause canser.

utR!

Volat
04-05-2014, 11:10 PM
MOOOO! Yes on the grill little rare, with a glass of that Pinot Noir is not too bad!

Full bodied red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz or bends that include the former varieties will go well with steak.

-----

I love lamb with red wine! It's tender and tasty. I won't try meat of wild animals. Not that I won't find game meat tasty. There're too many of us and few of them in the wild. I don't consider myself a self-righteous environmentalist. :)

TŠltos
04-06-2014, 04:55 PM
Full bodied red wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz or bends that include the former varieties will go well with steak.

-----

I love lamb with red wine! It's tender and tasty. I won't try meat of wild animals. Not that I won't find game meat tasty. There're too many of us and few of them in the wild. I don't consider myself a self-righteous environmentalist. :)
Lamb is excellent. I do a rack of lamb on a rotisserie over my fire pit. Or if I am in a hurry lamb chops, green peppers and onions, with lemon pepper in the broiler will do.

ilmari
04-08-2014, 02:37 AM
Once I have eaten quite raw redish steak and it was quite good but it was in Russian restaurant in Helsinki. It was served on the wood long service dish with soft whole carlics nice and expensive. I do like steak when it is no dry.

But the owen roast meat is often too dry. I'm not sure of meat probe.

You seem to know quite a lot of meat. :)

Best utR!
Hei, was that at Troikka in Helsinki? If so, I have also eaten there B)

utR!
04-08-2014, 07:22 PM
Hei, was that at Troikka in Helsinki? If so, I have also eaten there B)

Hello hello Ilmari,

It was Saslik not far from Kaivopuisto.

Best

utR!

LUKE33
04-10-2014, 06:40 AM
Someone sent me this recently : http://www.thetoc.gr/eng/family-health/article/greeks-more-avid-meat-eaters-than-the-americans


In one of his most hilarious stand-up sets, the brilliant comedian Denis Leary said it all: ďMeat is murder and murder tastes f*****ing good, but good luck explaining that to your colonĒÖ


Greek culinary habits have changed in the last 60 years. Every Greek consumes an average of 100 kilos of meat a year. Thatís 12 kilos more than the average US citizen does.

Once upon a time there was a culinary virtue called ďMediterranean dietĒ, consisted of plenty of vegetables, salads and olive oil and the Greeks were leading the world in it. Nowadays, the Mediterranean diet is still in effect Ė just not for the Greeks. They have replaced it with lots of souvlaki and other kinds of meat.

Yesterday was international chemistry day and three university chemistry departments made a presentation with data about modern Greek culinary habits and the results are shocking. In the country where light food was practically invented, the people eat more meat than the infamous Americans.

Every Greek consumes an average of 100 kilos of meat a year. Thatís 12 kilos more than the average US citizen does. The invocation of American meat consumption is no accident; given that US citizens are considered meat fanatics and obesity rates, particularly among young people are notorious.

To get a sense of measure, average meat consumption in the island of Crete in the 1960s was at a mere 32 grams a year, while the average annual olive oil consumption was 120 grams and 29% of everyday energy for the Cretans came from monounsaturated fats. Fifty years ago, olive oil was the main source for fatty acids. Meat, fish, seafood, dairy products and egg consumption were scarce due to economic hardship and religious fasting.

What happened in the last 60 years was processed food and junk food production which, along with more busy schedules, altered everyday culinary habits. As a result, obesity settled in both minors and adults, reaching the average levels of northern Europe and the US in the past 40 years. Moreover, fat content in processed food has been proven responsible for many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular deficiencies and most kinds of cancer.

Many things have changed for the better in the last half century, but the eclipse of the Mediterranean diet wasnít one of them. Tourists from all over the world are visiting Greece every year for, among other things, its food, oil and salads. Greeks are preparing them, serving them, make a living out of them, but donít consume them anymore. And that is not only a crime, it is just silly.

utR!
04-13-2014, 08:19 PM
Thanks Luke for information of consumption of meat in Greece. I just wonder is it lower now because of poorer economical situation?

I have not yet Finnish numbers but it may quite same. It is recommended to eat read meat 500 grams/a week but I think it is muc more/person. There is meat in many sort of products too.

utR!

LUKE33
04-13-2014, 08:31 PM
Thanks Luke for information of consumption of meat in Greece. I just wonder is it lower now because of poorer economical situation?

I have not yet Finnish numbers but it may quite same. It is recommended to eat read meat 500 grams/a week but I think it is muc more/person. There is meat in many sort of products too.

utR!

No - the souvlaki/kebab shops are the busiest when it comes to food.....cheap fast food.

utR!
04-17-2014, 04:40 PM
It's soon Eastertime. Do tradiotionally eat lamb then? And how it is done the best way, spices? I do eat lamb only at Easter and then it tastes somehow really nice, special; with mintsauce.

Best

utR!

alan
04-17-2014, 04:51 PM
Yep looking forward to some roast lamb on Easter Sunday. There is a brilliant way of cooking it with anchoves that sounds horrible but tastes amazing.


It's soon Eastertime. Do tradiotionally eat lamb then? And how it is done the best way, spices? I do eat lamb only at Easter and then it tastes somehow really nice, special; with mintsauce.

Best

utR!

alan
04-17-2014, 04:54 PM
There was a news article that really put me off a high protein type diet and more towards lots of fruit and veg but meat in moderation. I grow my own vegetables so it makes sense financially to switch to that sort of diet too.

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/mar/04/animal-protein-diets-smoking-meat-eggs-dairy

utR!
04-17-2014, 05:09 PM
Yep looking forward to some roast lamb on Easter Sunday. There is a brilliant way of cooking it with anchoves that sounds horrible but tastes amazing.

Yes, that may sound it but anchoves may give salty how to say sour/bitter taste into the lamb. I have eaten and cooked Jansson's temptation swedish potatoe casserole which is good too.

I found this article and it was new for me that it can be eaten also at Easter:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janssons_frestelse

So have a try! ;)

utR!

LUKE33
04-17-2014, 06:41 PM
Happy Easter !

1733

1734

1735

MikeWhalen
04-17-2014, 07:25 PM
for our family, a big ham, with macaroni and 3 cheese casserole , asparagus/various veggies is the tradition....mmmm
- going to my mtdna cousins for Easter Sunday-I'm bringing a bottle of 'Black Tower' (German)wine...I find almost everyone likes it alot, but most never think of it-guess its not one of the 'in style' ones

There will be some playoff hockey games on too, what a great day!

M

LUKE33
04-18-2014, 07:36 AM
1736


ďA marriage made in heavenĒ is the title of an article at the Economist magazine which explaines that in order to reduce the health risk of barbecuing meat, just add beer!


Grilling meat gives it great flavor. This taste, though, comes at a price, since the process creates molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which damage DNA and thus increase the eaterís chances of developing colon cancer. For those who think barbecues one of summerís great delights, that is a shame. But a group of researchers led by Isabel Ferreira of the University of Porto, in Portugal, think they have found a way around the problem. When barbecuing meat, they suggest, you should add beer.

This welcome advice was the result of some serious experiments, as Dr Ferreira explains in a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The PAHs created by grilling form from molecules called free radicals which, in turn, form from fat and protein in the intense heat of this type of cooking. One way of stopping PAH-formation, then, might be to apply chemicals called antioxidants that mop up free radicals. And beer is rich in these, in the shape of melanoidins, which form when barley is roasted. So Dr Ferreira and her colleagues prepared some beer marinades, bought some steaks and headed for the griddle.

One of their marinades was based on Pilsner, a pale lager. A second was based on a black beer (type unstated). Since black beers have more melanoidins than light beersóas the name suggests, they give it coloróDr Ferreiraís hypothesis was that steaks steeped in the black-beer marinade would form fewer PAHs than those steeped in the light-beer marinade, which would, in turn, form fewer than control steaks left un-marinated.

And so it proved. When cooked, unmarinated steaks had an average of 21 nanograms (billionths of a gram) of PAHs per gram of grilled meat. Those marinated in Pilsner averaged 18 nanograms. Those marinated in black beer averaged only 10 nanograms. Tasty and healthy too, then. Just what the doctor ordered.


Soruce : http://www.thetoc.gr/eng/food--travel/article/add-beer-to-your-easter-bbq

MikeWhalen
04-18-2014, 06:07 PM
LOL-its still bloody snowing and freezing here in Northern Ontario...so no bbqing this weekend...what a drag!!

M

LUKE33
04-18-2014, 08:26 PM
LOL-its still bloody snowing and freezing here in Northern Ontario...so no bbqing this weekend...what a drag!!

M

Happy Easter Mike - after a few beers things will be fine ! :)

17431743

leonardo
04-18-2014, 08:43 PM
We will be broiling lamb chops for our Easter dinner. I dress mine rather simply: olive oil, lemon juice and oregano, with some salt and pepper.

MikeWhalen
04-18-2014, 11:35 PM
lol Luke...I broke out some new Irish whiskey I had not tried before, KILBEGGAN's, so I too am not as irritated as I was before...nice smooth whiskey too
mmmm

Happy Easter to you too buddy

Mike

LUKE33
04-18-2014, 11:53 PM
lol Luke...I broke out some new Irish whiskey I had not tried before, KILBEGGAN's, so I too am not as irritated as I was before...nice smooth whiskey too
mmmm

Happy Easter to you too buddy

Mike

Thanks ! -- and enjoy :)

apophis99942
05-05-2014, 10:49 PM
There is a lot of chicken to eat in the world. In fact their population supposedly exceeds our own.

utR!
07-27-2014, 11:11 AM
Hi,

It has been hot hot week about +30. I have noticed that folk do not grill much outside like earlier when it has been cooler.

Maybe the warmth is a reason I do not fancy to eat meat (perhaps chicken) much. It does not taste because you just take care of the intake of water (also mineral water).

Have you got similiar experiences?

utR!

MikeWhalen
07-27-2014, 02:28 PM
its is the opposite here in Canada I think...the hotter it is, the more people use their BBQ's and avoid the kitchen for cooking

M

TŠltos
07-27-2014, 03:24 PM
its is the opposite here in Canada I think...the hotter it is, the more people use their BBQ's and avoid the kitchen for cooking

M
I think it is the same in the States too. Pretty much everyone I know and myself, we are all grilling instead of being in the kitchen with the hotter weather.

J Man
07-27-2014, 03:34 PM
I eat red meat because I find it to be delicious. :)

utR!
07-29-2014, 07:10 PM
Yes I do not know how many does grilling in this extraordinary hot weather. It is of course easier to grill later in the evening outside. One woman I used to talk with while waiting for the bus; said that they do eat grill food untill they get fef up to it.

When you have semester it is ok to be late awake. Too much protein and heavy food does not good for your body when it's too hot. But anyway you need some salty food too. ;)

utR!

Wolfie
07-29-2014, 07:25 PM
My grandfather, who was an American of Scots-Irish descent, refused to eat meat of any kind. I think it was an affinity for animals that inspired his disdain. When my grandmother was about to kill a chicken, he'd leave and not come back until after the deed was done.

Interestingly, at least I think it is, all three of his grandchildren independently became vegetarians. None of us talked about it with each other, it was just a decision we made on our own.

rms2
07-29-2014, 10:24 PM
Here in Virginia where I live, and apparently throughout the entire Mid-Atlantic region of the USA, there are so many deer that they have become a nuisance and an outright traffic hazard. Quite a few people die each year in traffic accidents trying to avoid hitting deer that spring out into the road unexpectedly. A few years ago, a former student of mine, a beautiful young girl with a bright future ahead of her, tried to avoid hitting a deer and hit a big tree instead. Now she is dead.

Besides that, venison is extremely tasty and low in fat.

Feel free to come down here, hunt some of our deer, and eat them. We have more than we need.

MikeWhalen
07-29-2014, 11:23 PM
a few buddies from work went on a 2-3 day motorcycle trip along the north shore of Lake superior (about 800 km)...they said that in the morning and evenings, all the deer and moose crossing the highway was a genuine hazard...they would have to slow down to 15-20 mph for several miles at a time at certain stretches that the critters favored...there were usually signs posted about high traffic animal crossings, and of course the whole area is surrounded by about a zillion square miles of forest

Mike

TŠltos
07-31-2014, 02:32 PM
Here in Virginia where I live, and apparently throughout the entire Mid-Atlantic region of the USA, there are so many deer that they have become a nuisance and an outright traffic hazard. Quite a few people die each year in traffic accidents trying to avoid hitting deer that spring out into the road unexpectedly. A few years ago, a former student of mine, a beautiful young girl with a bright future ahead of her, tried to avoid hitting a deer and hit a big tree instead. Now she is dead.

Besides that, venison is extremely tasty and low in fat.

Feel free to come down here, hunt some of our deer, and eat them. We have more than we need.
Very sad about your student. Yes those deer are like a nuisance in the Mid-Atlantic region. As you might remember I'm from Pennsylvania. I grew up on a mountain, and the deer and the bear would come prancing through our yard, right up to the house!

A few years ago, I was going up the mountain to see my Mom, it was at night. One of those deer literally seemed to appear out of nowhere, right in front of my car. I hit it so hard it went into the opposite lane of traffic. An SUV that was in the opposite lane was going so fast it drove over the deer and ended up airborne. Thankfully for that driver they didn't crash, and just kept driving down the mountain. But geez, thanks for stopping to check on me. Anyway lucky for me the game commissioner who lived up there too, just happened to be driving home and stopped to help me. He gave me a ride to my Mom's, and offered me to take home the road kill. At the time I was pretty shook up and couldn't even think about that.

But venison is pretty tasty, and I really like deer jerky! Yes hunt those suckers!!

rms2
07-31-2014, 08:38 PM
A few years ago, my youngest son and I were driving near Winchester, Virginia, when an ambulance passed us with its lights and siren on. As we watched, it smacked a deer that just happened to dart out into the highway at precisely the wrong time. The deer exploded in a red mist. The ambulance was totaled, its front end a complete wreck. Fortunately, no humans were hurt.

MikeWhalen
08-01-2014, 12:41 AM
speaking of BBQ's- I used mine tonight on some corn on the cob and 'fancy' hotdogs....should have stuck with the regular hotdogs (meaning ball park frank types), much better.
My brother got me some already shucked corn, so I coated it with butter, some garlic salt and pepper and wrapped each one in tinfoil...20 min later, some really delicious corn!

love the bbq

TŠltos
08-01-2014, 01:46 AM
A few years ago, my youngest son and I were driving near Winchester, Virginia, when an ambulance passed us with its lights and siren on. As we watched, it smacked a deer that just happened to dart out into the highway at precisely the wrong time. The deer exploded in a red mist. The ambulance was totaled, its front end a complete wreck. Fortunately, no humans were hurt.
YIKES! That was really graphic....I hope your son wasn't too young at the time to be freaked out at the sight of that. It's like a bad horror flick.

thetick
08-01-2014, 03:41 AM
YIKES! That was really graphic....I hope your son wasn't too young at the time to be freaked out at the sight of that. It's like a bad horror flick.

I grew up in PA also and my grandfather was a butcher/farmer. He showed me when I was about 5 years old how to butcher a deer. I also remember shooting pigs we were about to butcher... I was just a little older like 6 or 7 years old. I also remember chopping off the head of a goose when about 6 or 7. I was never freaked out it was just a part of normal life at the farm.

Kids nowadays are far too sheltered and expect a trophy for just showing up. It's good for a kids to see the reality of life weather it's death or just accepting failure.

TŠltos
08-01-2014, 04:01 AM
I grew up in PA also and my grandfather was a butcher/farmer. He showed me when I was about 5 years old how to butcher a deer. I also remember shooting pigs we were about to butcher... I was just a little older like 6 or 7 years old. I also remember chopping off the head of a goose when about 6 or 7. I was never freaked out it was just a part of normal life at the farm.

Kids nowadays are far too sheltered and expect a trophy for just showing up. It's good for a kids to see the reality of life weather it's death or just accepting failure.
I do agree kids are too sheltered today. And the everyone gets a trophy is totally ridiculous. My Mom told me when she was a kid they had chickens and yep she got to kill them when the time came. I would imagine most boys probably wouldn't be too shocked to see a deer explode into red mist. Most would probably think it was cool. Really I'm just grossed out by that visual.

Gray Fox
08-01-2014, 06:07 AM
I too was shown at a young age how to field dress a deer. It wasn't that bad and I agree, kids today are way too sheltered.

MikeWhalen
08-01-2014, 12:37 PM
kids are too sheltered, with these 'helicopter' parents that do nothing but 'hover' around them, shielding them from everything, including the natural consequences of their own bad choices, only to be 'shocked' when they grow up to be selfish, dim jerks that have a powerful sense of entitlement

I just wish these kids had to go what I did as a kid...trudging 10 miles to school everyday, during a blizzard, up hill-BOTH WAYS- and having to fight off those god damn pterodactyls trying to make a lunch of me...what softies
:)

Mike

thetick
08-02-2014, 05:16 AM
I just wish these kids had to go what I did as a kid...trudging 10 miles to school everyday, during a blizzard, up hill-BOTH WAYS- and having to fight off those god damn pterodactyls trying to make a lunch of me...what softies

My grandfather had a similar story when I was boy except he had to walk 10 miles in 2 feet of snow carrying a gun to school to defend himself from the bears all at the age 5. He would tell this story when we got a 1 or 2 hour delay for school during a winter storm.

Back then it was socially acceptable to take a pocket knife and even a loaded gun to school.

geebee
08-02-2014, 09:33 AM
After my dad retired from the Air Force when I was about 11, we moved back to his home area in Pennsylvania. My parents bought a house about a mile outside of town. Since they had six kids, feeding us was always an issue, but the house was on about an acre of land, so we were able to have a big garden. My dad also got the bright idea of building a pigpen at one corner of the lot.

Usually we'd buy a couple of piglets and raise them until they were about 200 pounds or so. We never butchered them ourselves, but I have no idea if that was due to squeamishness, a lack of expertise, or a lack of tools or facilities. In any case, when the time came, we'd just load them in the back of a pickup truck and take them to a butcher. Afterward, we'd bring home boxes of various cuts that we had to wrap in white paper and put in the freezer.

Since feeding and watering the pigs was mostly my job, along with catching them if they got out, I felt a strange sort of glee about the wrapping process. That was usually a family event for us. Wrap, tape, label, hand to a sibling; repeat. The sibling would put cuts into the freezer, trying to keep them reasonably organized.

Anyway, for obvious reasons, we were never encouraged to think of the pigs as pets, which included giving them names. But my youngest sister sometimes did, using names like "Muddy" and "Muddier".

When she was maybe 3-4 and I was 14-15, I asked her if she knew what had become of Muddy and Muddier, never really thinking she might be upset about it. She wasn't. She got a big grin on her face, rubbed her stomach and said, "I ate them."

Still ... I can't really imagine being the one to kill them and cut them into pieces. It would be even worse for me with cattle, because some of them are almost cute. (Especially the ones with the forehead curl.) I have this picture that maybe someday there will be livestock that, when the times comes, will simply march themselves to the processing facility and drop dead of their own accord -- with contented smiles, of course.

Some of my cousins, uncles, and even aunts are hunters; but I never was. I did bag one deer when I was living in Texas, but that's just because I doe ran out into the road right in front of me. The scariest part was that my daughter was with me, and the deer actually cracked the windshield and put a serious dent in the front end; even a couple of small slashes to the hood (from hooves, I think). But both my daughter and I were fine.

It was of course a lot worse for the deer.

rms2
08-02-2014, 02:42 PM
My grandfather had a similar story when I was boy except he had to walk 10 miles in 2 feet of snow carrying a gun to school to defend himself from the bears all at the age 5. He would tell this story when we got a 1 or 2 hour delay for school during a winter storm.

Back then it was socially acceptable to take a pocket knife and even a loaded gun to school.

Some high schools had rifle ranges and shooting teams.

Down in SW Virginia, school kids get a week off from school during deer season. We lived for awhile out in the country in Tazewell County, which is a very mountainous area. I always made my kids wear blaze-orange ball caps when playing outside during deer season, hopefully to prevent some fool from mistaking them for deer and shooting them.

thetick
08-02-2014, 05:49 PM
Some high schools had rifle ranges and shooting teams.

Down in SW Virginia, school kids get a week off from school during deer season...

The schools in central PA never had shooting teams, but even to this day many schools have the first day of buck as a holiday. When I went to school it was an entire week. My dad who is now in his 70's said it was two weeks when he was a kid.

thetick
08-02-2014, 05:56 PM
We never butchered them ourselves, but I have no idea if that was due to squeamishness, a lack of expertise, or a lack of tools or facilities. In any case, when the time came, we'd just load them in the back of a pickup truck and take them to a butcher. Afterward, we'd bring home boxes of various cuts that we had to wrap in white paper and put in the freezer.

You certainly don't want to butcher pigs unless you have all the expertise and tools ( saws, knives , kettles, meat hooks, slaughter house). I wrapped lots of meat as kid mostly for my grandfather's customers. My grandpa paid me and my brother very good to wrap meat for his customers. Most people wrapped their own since wrapping was purposely priced to encourage home wrapping.

geebee
08-03-2014, 09:08 AM
The schools in central PA never had shooting teams, but even to this day many schools have the first day of buck as a holiday. When I went to school it was an entire week. My dad who is now in his 70's said it was two weeks when he was a kid.

My school district in Blair County only had about 800 kids in the entire district, divided between one elementary school and one junior-senior high school. No shooting team for us, either. We could barely do basketball and football. (Well, we had track, too; but anything else was only intramural.)

We got the first day of hunting season off, but I don't remember what the official holiday was. They just knew that they might as well have the day off, since otherwise there wouldn't have been enough students for them to get their state money. (I think they'd have been short a few teachers, too.)

As I recall, it was also mandatory for us to attend a hunter safety course (taught at the school by a PA game warden, IIRC), even if we weren't planning to hunt.

utR!
12-16-2014, 07:22 PM
Are you eating ham or turkey at Xmas? I do like turkey nam. But during the first 20 years I did eat every year ham because it was like that at my home. It is not bad when it is done well and eaten cold on top of sandwich. Hams are massive nowadays. :eek:

I read that there is found MRSA in pork. Which is not a wonder or is it?

utR

Salkin
12-16-2014, 09:19 PM
Are you eating ham or turkey at Xmas? I do like turkey nam. But during the first 20 years I did eat every year ham because it was like that at my home. It is not bad when it is done well and eaten cold on top of sandwich. Hams are massive nowadays. :eek:

Turkey never really did very much for me. I much prefer ham, especially the Christmas variety.


I read that there is found MRSA in pork. Which is not a wonder or is it?

I suppose given farming practices, it's not. Would it survive being cooked in an oven, though? It may be methicillin-resistant, but heat, not so much. :)

MikeWhalen
12-16-2014, 09:43 PM
I love both ham and Turkey, 2 of my most favorite meats
...but it will be a small xmas dinner this year as much of the family has moved out of town for work ect.
Just my elder brother and I, so we will probably go the Ham route...with nice mac and cheese casserole, asparagus, homemade balsamic dressing salad and god knows what for desert
mmmm

Mike

ilmari
12-16-2014, 11:50 PM
Thankfully we won't be having lutfisk (lipeškala) like we traditionally had up until a few years ago, in those Christmas dinners, it was both lutfisk and meatballs with boiled potatoes and white sauce for all of the above.

We don't each much meat, but I will probably make a good sized ribeye as a roast, served with some rutabaga casserole (lanttulaatikko) and asparagus. If not that, perhaps a small organic ham.

To me, turkey is overrated.

J Man
12-17-2014, 12:54 AM
Because it tastes great.

rms2
12-17-2014, 12:32 PM
I think we'll probably be having turkey for Christmas. I prefer ham, but I had a heart attack back in May, and the docs put a stent in one of my coronary arteries. Since that time I have altered my diet a great deal. I don't eat and drink a lot of the stuff I used to eat and drink, and I have lost just over 50 pounds. One of the things I have given up is red meat. Now I eat turkey, chicken, and fish. I would eat very lean red meat, like grass-fed beef, venison, or buffalo, but I don't have much occasion to find those things. I saw some bison steaks and hamburger in Wegman's the other day, but it was a bit too expensive.

I like being leaner myself, but I miss not having to think about what I am eating or drinking.

I don't mean to sound preachy, and I absolutely uphold your right to eat and drink whatever you want, and to get as fat as you want, but if your family has a history of heart disease, like mine, I recommend you cut back on the saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, salt, and sugar while you still can. I was blessed to survive my heart attack, which happened early on May 19, 2014, while I was walking from the train station to work. Some guys are not so lucky.

R.Rocca
12-17-2014, 02:05 PM
I think we'll probably be having turkey for Christmas. I prefer ham, but I had a heart attack back in May, and the docs put a stent in one of my coronary arteries. Since that time I have altered my diet a great deal. I don't eat and drink a lot of the stuff I used to eat and drink, and I have lost just over 50 pounds. One of the things I have given up is red meat. Now I eat turkey, chicken, and fish. I would eat very lean red meat, like grass-fed beef, venison, or buffalo, but I don't have much occasion to find those things. I saw some bison steaks and hamburger in Wegman's the other day, but it was a bit too expensive.

I like being leaner myself, but I miss not having to think about what I am eating or drinking.

I don't mean to sound preachy, and I absolutely uphold your right to eat and drink whatever you want, and to get as fat as you want, but if your family has a history of heart disease, like mine, I recommend you cut back on the saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, salt, and sugar while you still can. I was blessed to survive my heart attack, which happened early on May 19, 2014, while I was walking from the train station to work. Some guys are not so lucky.

I didn't realize that, but I'm glad you're still with us. :) My paternal grandfather died of a heart attack at age 50 and my father survived a heart attach at age 38, which is ridiculously young. Both were a good 40-50 pounds over weight however. I have the benefit of being tall (6'1) and thin (190 lbs), but my metabolism started slowing down a couple of years ago, and now at age 43, I only eat red meat every few weeks or so, which is a big cut-back for me, since I used to eat it once or twice a week. I do eat a salad for lunch every other day, and I've had that ritual for about five years now. I also rarely eat breakfast, which is contrary to the "breakfast is the most important meal of the day" nonsense I was taught in grammar school. Yes, I'm sure when my ancestors got up at 4:00 AM to work the fields until sun down, half a dozen eggs and bacon in the morning were quite appropriate, but my morning consists of a 1 hour morning automobile commute followed by all-day meetings sitting on my butt, with some air travel every so often. Not really something that requires a lot of calories IMO. Anyway, this seems like the right balance for me, but of course everyone is different.

rms2
12-17-2014, 04:40 PM
I'm the same height as you, but I am 59 (I was 58 when I had the heart attack) and had packed on a lot of weight over the last 14 years or so. Now I am 50+ pounds lighter, which feels great. It sounds strange to say it, but in that way the heart attack was a blessing.

utR!
12-17-2014, 06:35 PM
I love both ham and Turkey, 2 of my most favorite meats
...but it will be a small xmas dinner this year as much of the family has moved out of town for work ect.
Just my elder brother and I, so we will probably go the Ham route...with nice mac and cheese casserole, asparagus, homemade balsamic dressing salad and god knows what for desert
mmmm


Mike

You Mike are able to write it that it makes a bit hungry cheese casserole a lot energy but it may be delicious nam. I do miss old time Xmas traditions. We children sang for parents, we made a Xmas play acting you know. Yes parcels were important but also the food. My mother made so good Karelian casserole well done in owen hours and left much crease. It was so good with potatoes and every Xmas handmade Karelian pastries (karjalanpiirakat).

So waiting for Xmas eve...

utR

utR!
12-17-2014, 06:38 PM
I'm the same height as you, but I am 59 (I was 58 when I had the heart attack) and had packed on a lot of weight over the last 14 years or so. Now I am 50+ pounds lighter, which feels great. It sounds strange to say it, but in that way the heart attack was a blessing.

Good for you; you are right it was a blessing because your life is much easier and you do feel better. It is not so easy to brake the old eating habits but you have managed. :)

utR!

utR!
12-17-2014, 06:45 PM
Thankfully we won't be having lutfisk (lipeškala) like we traditionally had up until a few years ago, in those Christmas dinners, it was both lutfisk and meatballs with boiled potatoes and white sauce for all of the above.

We don't each much meat, but I will probably make a good sized ribeye as a roast, served with some rutabaga casserole (lanttulaatikko) and asparagus. If not that, perhaps a small organic ham.

To me, turkey is overrated.

Ilmari hi,

My parents had lipeškala every Xmas but I got used to it smell. But I do no like it. Lanttulaatikko is maybe the most disgusting food I know. I can not eat it no no. But it belongs to many Xmas tables. Ham is still the main thing and some of people do eat one big ham even before Xmas.

How organic ham taste, what a difference?

utR!

Leeroy Jenkins
12-18-2014, 02:37 AM
I think we'll probably be having turkey for Christmas. I prefer ham, but I had a heart attack back in May, and the docs put a stent in one of my coronary arteries. Since that time I have altered my diet a great deal. I don't eat and drink a lot of the stuff I used to eat and drink, and I have lost just over 50 pounds. One of the things I have given up is red meat. Now I eat turkey, chicken, and fish. I would eat very lean red meat, like grass-fed beef, venison, or buffalo, but I don't have much occasion to find those things. I saw some bison steaks and hamburger in Wegman's the other day, but it was a bit too expensive.

I like being leaner myself, but I miss not having to think about what I am eating or drinking.

I don't mean to sound preachy, and I absolutely uphold your right to eat and drink whatever you want, and to get as fat as you want, but if your family has a history of heart disease, like mine, I recommend you cut back on the saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, salt, and sugar while you still can. I was blessed to survive my heart attack, which happened early on May 19, 2014, while I was walking from the train station to work. Some guys are not so lucky.

I kind of feel your pain, bro.

I was diagnosed with pericarditis this past May after having what I thought was a heart attack. I was 30 at the time, so it scared the crap out of me when the doctor told me I had heart damage, and that they needed to perform cardiac catheterization to make sure I didn't have any blockage, since heart disease runs on my paternal side. Fortunately, my heart did not have any blockage or plaque build up, and the pain that I thought was a heart attack was just a very bad pericarditis flare up.

Although my heart was deemed healthy, the doctor recommended I watch my cholesterol and saturated fat intake given my family's medical history. Let me tell you, since then, there has been hardly any sodas and whole lot of lean chicken and spinach leaves for me. :lol: I still eat a medium cooked steak about twice a month, and drink a couple of lattes a week, but that is about the limit of my gluttony these days.

ilmari
12-19-2014, 03:37 AM
Ilmari hi,

My parents had lipeškala every Xmas but I got used to it smell. But I do no like it. Lanttulaatikko is maybe the most disgusting food I know. I can not eat it no no. But it belongs to many Xmas tables. Ham is still the main thing and some of people do eat one big ham even before Xmas.

How organic ham taste, what a difference?

utR!

utR!

It tastes like ham tasted when we were children, maybe ham in Finland is still quite a bit like that. Just like something the neighbor would make in the smoker if you didn't have your own to do.

It's a bit more expensive, but we don't eat much and then it is into the freezer and eventually into a pot of split pea soup :dance: split pea is my favorite, especially with joululimppu and good butter.

J Man
12-22-2014, 01:29 AM
utR!

It tastes like ham tasted when we were children, maybe ham in Finland is still quite a bit like that. Just like something the neighbor would make in the smoker if you didn't have your own to do.

It's a bit more expensive, but we don't eat much and then it is into the freezer and eventually into a pot of split pea soup :dance: split pea is my favorite, especially with joululimppu and good butter.

You Skinlanders! :P

Agamemnon
12-22-2014, 02:42 AM
Any of you heard about Armin Meiwes? Now that's someone who could make you reconsider being carnivore...

rms2
12-22-2014, 01:44 PM
Any of you heard about Armin Meiwes? Now that's someone who could make you reconsider being carnivore...

Oh, good grief! Your post caused me to look that up, and now I'm sorry I did. Aarrgghh!

Gray Fox
12-22-2014, 03:16 PM
Oh, good grief! Your post caused me to look that up, and now I'm sorry I did. Aarrgghh!

LOL yeah I heard about that through the Rammstein song, Mein Teil. Du bist, was du isst! :puke:

Salkin
12-22-2014, 04:00 PM
Any of you heard about Armin Meiwes? Now that's someone who could make you reconsider being carnivore...

Morbidly fascinating, but apparently I'm able to compartmentalise things well enough that I can still comfortably be a consummate carnivore (no long pig, though, thanks!)

GailT
12-22-2014, 05:08 PM
I very rarely eat meat and when I do, I try to make sure it was raised and killed humanely. I had a transformative experience at a village market in the Congo where a guy was slaughtering young goats with a dull blade - after trying to saw through a goat's neck, he took a break to sharpen the blade, with the goat lying on the ground bleeding and wailing. Three other goats were tied up next to him shaking violently. I believe many mammals have a wide range of emotional experience, perhaps not that different from ours, and I don't want any sentient being to be tortured to provide me a meal.

TŠltos
12-22-2014, 05:33 PM
Seafood and stuffed shells Christmas Eve. Ham on Christmas Day. I like to make it with a bottle of 7-Up, yep soda poured over it. And the pineapple slices on it are a must have. :hungry:

jayphilip
04-13-2015, 07:55 AM
Many individuals like their various meats BBQ'ed which is of course, the contemporary comparative of how our historical forefathers would have prepared their various meats...over an start campfire-do you think that was done for enough hundreds of years that the taste information got 'hard wired' into our prefers and dislikes? So here's the thing always eat healthy and stay fit.

Joe B
02-03-2016, 10:47 PM
Was Frozen Mammoth or Giant Ground Sloth Served for Dinner at The Explorers Club?

Famously, members of The Explorers Club purportedly dined on frozen mammoth from Alaska, USA, in 1951. This event, well received by the press and general public, became an enduring legend for the Club and popularized the notorious annual tradition of serving rare and exotic food at Club dinners that continues to this day. The Yale Peabody Museum holds a sample of meat preserved from the 1951 meal, interestingly labeled as a South American giant ground sloth (Megatherium), not mammoth.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0146825
Citation: Glass JR, Davis M, Walsh TJ, Sargis EJ, Caccone A (2016) Was Frozen Mammoth or Giant Ground Sloth Served for Dinner at The Explorers Club? PLoS ONE 11(2): e0146825. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0146825

DMXX
02-04-2016, 12:19 AM
In my humble opinion, the perceived over-consumption of red meat would be lowered by virtue of the general Western public being made aware of the strong hereditary nature of high cholesterol in West Europeans.

If I remember my stats correctly, the prevalence of familial (monogenic) hypercholesterolaemia (that's high cholesterol in the bloostream) is around 1:500 in the US. The frequency is even higher among French Canadians and indigenous British of western background (i.e. Devonians, Cornish). Polygenic hypercholesterolaemia is far more common than the monogenic form.

I've seen some proposals to ration meat supplies, but that removes individual autonomy from the equation and lends even more power to government agencies... I highly doubt America's FDA will do a competent job at regulating that in any real world circumstance.

As for why I consume red meat... It's actually become a rarity these days, and not for health reasons (I have no family history of any form of cancer, and I'm one of those "genetic freaks" with low LDL and high HDL no matter how junk-ridden my diet is). I do enjoy the taste and do not fully agree with the "moral" perspective asserted by vegan activists.

Afshar
02-04-2016, 08:03 AM
I eat red meat several times a week, its the number one food on my list. Every dish has to contain meat in some form.
There is a Turkish proverb that goes "Atın ŲlŁmŁ arpadan olsun", meaning "let the horse die from barley", I dont care about health issues :).

Asimakidis
02-04-2016, 12:30 PM
I don't. Vegetarian since 1995 and vegan since 2014.. Still alive and well!! ;)

Arbogan
02-04-2016, 04:17 PM
I prefer poultry. But meat is meat regardless. I rarely eat it these days.


I don't. Vegetarian since 1995 and vegan since 2014.. Still alive and well!! ;)
How is that possible? What do you say to your aunt during family gatherings?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFemw_6a-Tg

Asimakidis
02-06-2016, 01:39 AM
:) Trust me..it aint easy on family gatherings..

Gravetto-Danubian
02-06-2016, 01:53 AM
:) Trust me..it aint easy on family gatherings..

I'll say
I don't think I've heard of / met any Balkan male vegetarians ;)

I'm not moved by the ethical arguements & perceived health effects of vegetarianism (in fact I'd view it in opposite), but we do try to go "Vego" one night a week
Good on your dedication

Blitz
02-06-2016, 11:54 AM
Red meat - rarely. Typically it is lamb / goat even. Occasionally beef.

Fish - pretty much all the time, crave it, given a chance I could eat a whole salmon by myself. Anything seafood related, I'll eat. Squid, octopus, etc. Doesn't matter. I remember when just turning 23, a very close friend's mother, made this dish literally crammed with seafood. Almost everything imaginable that you can find at the typical seafood counter and then some - this was in one of the scandinavian countries. I think I shocked them, cause well Canadian with a very British background, neither country is exactly known for eating fish.

Chicken/Turkey - not readily, goose / duck - sure.

Asimakidis
02-07-2016, 10:08 AM
Well..I was raised in Sweden..:)
It is all about an idea. When it gets a hold of you it is hard to fight back. We all see things differently I guess.

Cinnamon orange
02-09-2016, 12:48 PM
I was anemic due to undiagnosed celiac disease and used to crave red meat. Still do sometimes but not as often. I hope that the animals I eat are killed humanely, with as little pain and suffering as possible but have no plans to stop eating meat. When possible, I buy grass fed, free range, organic etc meats, eggs etc.

Hanna
02-09-2016, 02:14 PM
I'm not much of a red meat eater, I prefer chicken. I eat red meat sometimes cause I also suffered from anemia, it was severe anemia and the doctor told me I should go for blood transfusion. Thank God I am not anemic anymore after taking Iron supplements.

Volat
02-10-2016, 12:06 PM
I'm not much of a red meat eater, I prefer chicken. I eat red meat sometimes cause I also suffered from anemia, it was severe anemia and the doctor told me I should go for blood transfusion. Thank God I am not anemic anymore after taking Iron supplements.

I liked poultry when I was a child visiting my granparents' village on summer vacations. Locals kept chickens, ducks, geese. Occasionally , turkeys. Nowadays shops sell chicken meat that does taste anything like from my childhood. There is something about chickens are fed these days or done to them. Poultry does not taste good anymore. I prefer lamb.

Hanna
02-10-2016, 05:52 PM
I liked poultry when I was a child visiting my granparents' village on summer vacations. Locals kept chickens, ducks, geese. Occasionally , turkeys. Nowadays shops sell chicken meat that does taste anything like from my childhood. There is something about chickens are fed these days or done to them. Poultry does not taste good anymore. I prefer lamb.
I know what you mean. Actually most poultry and meats aren't safe as they used to be. When I was in America I once participated in a conference about meat and poultry. In the conference they showed us a video clip on what animals are fed with, animals are fed with also sorts of gross stuff such as human aborted babies!! Since then I felt disgusted and tried my best to consume natural organic foods.

I think in America it is harder to find vegetarian fed, hormone free animals that is affordable.
Where I am living there is easy access to organic meat and poultry. The eggs and chicken I buy are hormone free, vegetarian fed and not very expensive.

star rider
02-10-2016, 07:21 PM
I will occasionally eat red meat. But for the most part eat fish that I catch(steelhead and other varieties of Salmon. as well as shellfish and white meat fish) I do occasionally hunt and add wild game to the mix. outside of that it's Poultry, pork and some beef.

I tend to not digest heavy starch filled carbs( reduce potato , rice and breads) and prefer green veggies.

I love dishes similar to Pho sans the noddles and add more veggies if I can with seafood or wild game :)

Volat
02-11-2016, 05:37 AM
I don't have any affiliation with 'green parties', but I would not eat wild game even if it tastes so good. There are a lot of us and few wild animals. I will only eat what people produce themselves.

Cinnamon orange
02-11-2016, 11:26 AM
I know what you mean. Actually most poultry and meats aren't safe as they used to be. When I was in America I once participated in a conference about meat and poultry. In the conference they showed us a video clip on what animals are fed with, animals are fed with also sorts of gross stuff such as human aborted babies!! Since then I felt disgusted and tried my best to consume natural organic foods.

I think in America it is harder to find vegetarian fed, hormone free animals that is affordable.
Where I am living there is easy access to organic meat and poultry. The eggs and chicken I buy are hormone free, vegetarian fed and not very expensive.

Yes, hormone, anti biotic free is harder to find. I buy cheeses, breakfast sausages, and lunch meat from Applegate farms while in the US, they can be found at Target, Kroger and such. I buy sometimes from WholeFoods and Wegmons as well. I am willing to pay a bit more for better quality. In the US many animals are corn feed vs grass and other grains that can affect the taste. I have never heard of human fetuses being fed to animals....that seems a bit outlandish. There was a Canadian serial killer, who was a pig farmer and fed his victims to his animals.

Cinnamon orange
02-11-2016, 11:29 AM
I don't have any affiliation with 'green parties', but I would not eat wild game even if it tastes so good. There are a lot of us and few wild animals. I will only eat what people produce themselves.

Depends, in the US there are lots of for example, White tailed deer, I see nothing wrong with eating them as they are in many areas over populated. I don't hunt myself but do not object to the hunting of non at risk populations.

Volat
02-12-2016, 01:51 AM
Yes, hormone, anti biotic free is harder to find. I buy cheeses, breakfast sausages, and lunch meat from Applegate farms while in the US, they can be found at Target, Kroger and such. I buy sometimes from WholeFoods and Wegmons as well. I am willing to pay a bit more for better quality. In the US many animals are corn feed vs grass and other grains that can affect the taste. I have never heard of human fetuses being fed to animals....that seems a bit outlandish. There was a Canadian serial killer, who was a pig farmer and fed his victims to his animals.

I believe most meats in 'developed countries' are not free of hormones including beef. In some of these countries only lamb is free of hormones.

Volat
02-12-2016, 02:00 AM
Depends, in the US there are lots of for example, White tailed deer, I see nothing wrong with eating them as they are in many areas over populated. I don't hunt myself but do not object to the hunting of non at risk populations.
There are many white tailed deers in US because most Americans are not interested in them. I don't think white tailed deer or any specie can provide enough meat for 300 mln Americans. I don't doubt the quality and tastefulness of wild game meat. I don't condemn hunters either. In my opinion hunting to obtain food would have made more sense in the past. Nowadays we can get good quality products produced by people in organic shops.

Cinnamon orange
02-12-2016, 11:38 AM
There are many white tailed deers in US because most Americans are not interested in them. I don't think white tailed deer or any specie can provide enough meat for 300 mln Americans. I don't doubt the quality and tastefulness of wild game meat. I don't condemn hunters either. In my opinion hunting to obtain food would have made more sense in the past. Nowadays we can get good quality products produced by people in organic shops.

Err I never said they would provide meat for every American..... I was reply to your comment that we should not eat wild animals because there are not very many of them.

Volat
02-12-2016, 02:48 PM
Err I never said they would provide meat for every American..... I was reply to your comment that we should not eat wild animals because there are not very many of them.

If you look at larger picture there are few of wild animals and there are 7 billions of people. A lot of us including myself want meat. If we popularise wild game, certain wild animals will disappear quickly. As many animals dissapeared in Europe not long ago. I don't eat wild game so you and others can enjoy it.

Torc Seanathair
02-13-2016, 02:46 PM
For the USA and Canada, it is the popular game animals that are the very safest from being hunted to extinction. The local wildlife agencies are doing a superb job of maintaining a healthy population. Habitat destruction would be more of a concern here. I won't make any similar statements about some of our citizens that do the big game adventure hunts on other continents.

Torc Seanathair
02-13-2016, 03:07 PM
I love Mexican food, and but always had a preference for their ground beef or steak dishes. That has caught up with me, in that my cholesterol would trend towards 240-252. Statins would drop that very quickly, so I kept going with beef, pork, sausage, and bacon.
Now, after reviewing my 400 page medical condition report from Promethease.com, I see that I have a genetic marker indicating that I don't metabolize statins properly, leading to myopathy.
So now, I'm going to have to shun the red meat and avoid reliance on statins.
I hate the shredded chicken at Mexican restaurants, but I think I can get some enjoyment in grilled chicken in quesadillas and such.
I think I have acquired a terminal case of hypochondria after reviewing that Promethease report.

DMXX
02-13-2016, 04:17 PM
Now, after reviewing my 400 page medical condition report from Promethease.com, I see that I have a genetic marker indicating that I don't metabolize statins properly, leading to myopathy.

Might be an idea to discuss this with your physician so they could find alternatives if dietary modifications alone won't fix it (e.g. ezetimibe).

Hanna
02-13-2016, 05:38 PM
I believe most meats in 'developed countries' are not free of hormones including beef. In some of these countries only lamb is free of hormones.

One can even differentiate organic meat just by its taste. We have meat here that comes from Australia, Pakistan, India and local meat. Ironically local meat is the most expensive followed by Pakistani and Indian meat. Australian meat is the cheapest and has no taste when compared to Pakistani and local meat. Meat from more developed countries are definitely less organic.

Volat
02-13-2016, 06:38 PM
I won't make any similar statements about some of our citizens that do the big game adventure hunts on other continents.

Like paying to shoot big cats , elephants and other big animals for fun?. Americans are shooting a lot of animals around the world. . Only crowd's favourite lion Cecil attracted a lot of attention. It may have something to do with gun culture in America. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3226320/Dentist-Walter-Palmer-killed-Cecil-Lion-returns-work-six-weeks-protests-threats-life.html

This man must be tough for shooting an elephant. http://focusingonwildlife.com/news/wp-content/uploads/01trophyhunting.ngsversion.1447871400556.adapt_.11 90.1.jpg

Torc Seanathair
02-13-2016, 08:11 PM
Yes, I love my guns and won't apologize for that. I'll make it clear, though, that I'm not defending the guy that killed Cecil. The guy sitting on the dead elephant is British, and I'm not defending him, either. Neither of those guys did it to curb overpopulation, or to put food on their table, and they certainly put an end to some wonderful beasts.

rms2
02-14-2016, 12:09 AM
I like guns. Free people have them. Serfs do not.

Agamemnon
02-14-2016, 01:49 AM
Here in France, it's virtually impossible to own a gun... And well, you saw the results last November.

Cinnamon orange
02-16-2016, 07:41 AM
If you look at larger picture there are few of wild animals and there are 7 billions of people. A lot of us including myself want meat. If we popularise wild game, certain wild animals will disappear quickly. As many animals dissapeared in Europe not long ago. I don't eat wild game so you and others can enjoy it.

Honestly, your posts to me are bizarre , you seem to have no comprehension of what I have written but go off on thoughts unrelated to what I have said..... I will not reply further.

Volat
02-16-2016, 08:28 AM
Honestly, your posts to me are bizarre , you seem to have no comprehension of what I have written but go off on thoughts unrelated to what I have said..... I will not reply further.

This is what you wrote: Depends, in the US there are lots of for example, White tailed deer, I see nothing wrong with eating them as they are in many areas over populated.
I replied: There are many white tailed deers in US because most Americans are not interested in them. I don't think white tailed deer or any specie can provide enough meat for 300 mln Americans

We are discussing wild animals in reference to providing food on the table. There is a healthy population of white tailed deer in US due to moderate number of hunters for which hunting is a recreational activity. But if wild game is popularised, then animals will disappear as they have in Europe. I made a genuine remark above. If you cannot form coherent arguments other than 'bizzar posts' or 'no comprehension' then better not replying.

The_Lyonnist
02-18-2016, 11:36 AM
Red meat is too good. In addition, I live in Lyon, world capital of gastronomy. Forced to eat!

The_Lyonnist
02-18-2016, 11:41 AM
I like guns. Free people have them. Serfs do not.

You love freedom to evil?

utR!
02-18-2016, 02:35 PM
I think guns are best and quicker way for hunting food/animals. But there are still people who have no guns and have to do it in most primitive ways just to survive.

utR!

rms2
02-23-2016, 04:45 PM
I think guns are best and quicker way for hunting food/animals. But there are still people who have no guns and have to do it in most primitive ways just to survive.

utR!

Here in Virginia rabbits are plentiful, and they are really stupid. I don't hunt them, but it would be relatively easy to just pick up a rock, throw it at a rabbit - you know, one of those who has stopped still in his tracks because he thinks if he does that you can't see him - and kill him.

Squirrels are even more plentiful than rabbits, but they are about a thousand times smarter than rabbits. Still, it wouldn't be too hard to brain them with rocks, as well.

AJL
02-24-2016, 03:32 PM
Here in Virginia rabbits are plentiful, and they are really stupid. I don't hunt them, but it would be relatively easy to just pick up a rock, throw it at a rabbit - you know, one of those who has stopped still in his tracks because he thinks if he does that you can't see him - and kill him.

In some years that's pretty much how the ruffed grouse are here.

MikeWhalen
03-15-2016, 07:36 PM
just say'in

8156

Mike

AJL
04-03-2016, 03:56 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/03/30/cornell-study-finds-some-people-may-be-genetically-programmed-to-be-vegetarians/

utR!
04-04-2016, 06:30 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/03/30/cornell-study-finds-some-people-may-be-genetically-programmed-to-be-vegetarians/

You A found quite an interesting article indeed, there are benefits to be a vegetarian + if you have right genes ;). Our brains need good oils too.

best

utR

AJL
04-04-2016, 06:51 PM
You A found quite an interesting article indeed, there are benefits to be a vegetarian + if you have right genes ;). Our brains need good oils too.

best

utR

Indeed, you can see from my Atlantic/North Sea maternal HLA haplotype, I am destined to be an eater of salmon and cod. :)

8596

DMXX
04-04-2016, 07:08 PM
From personal experience, I'm fairly certain my genotype supports an omnivorous rather than a strictly vegetarian or vegan diet.

I experimented for weeks on both diets last year, meticulously tracking for calories, macronutrients and covering the usual deficiencies... Found myself feeling more lethargic, listless and weaker in the gym despite everything being controlled compared to my usual baseline (that pattern continued after two weeks of going in a caloric surplus even).

I believe I shared my experiences on the forum before. Needless to say I was extremely surprised to go through that (entered the experimentation expecting to have the "vitality boon" vegan or vegetarian proponents speak of...). I feel extremely well in myself on an omnivorous, high carbohydrate (low sugar), low sodium, high fibre, low fat, high protein and dairy-rich diet. Ketogenic or low carb diets absolutely don't agree with me in the least (suspect that's genetic as well).

Vegetarians and vegans, for the time being, are also missing out quite a bit on carnosine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnosine). Supplementation for that, however, should be fine, given it's a relatively simple molecule (dipeptide).

I'm not particularly fond of fatty meat, so whenever lab-grown meat becomes commercially viable, I'll be jumping on that bandwagon immediately for innumerable reasons (extremely low fat, low carbon footprint ergo environmentally friendly, hypothetically fewer risks of infective vectors compared to slaughterhouses etc.).

AJL
04-04-2016, 07:36 PM
I'm not particularly fond of fatty meat, so whenever lab-grown meat becomes commercially viable, I'll be jumping on that bandwagon immediately for innumerable reasons (extremely low fat, low carbon footprint ergo environmentally friendly, hypothetically fewer risks of infective vectors compared to slaughterhouses etc.).

Rabbit is great for being low-fat and low-carbon, though you have to watch for tularemia. It has so little fat, in fact, that people who relied heavily on it historically sometimes suffered metabolic problems if it was their only protein:

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/rabbit-starvation/

Anglecynn
04-04-2016, 07:44 PM
:laugh:A few years back I reluctantly went to a fish restaurant, i chose a none fish meal but the aroma from the fish was so overwhelming and engulfed my food :faint: I could not eat it and went and sat outside. Good job it was summer.

basque :rolleyes: As for kippers....yuk

It's quite funny, a friend of mine was the same. Hated it whenever i fried fish, i never got it - i mean i can smell it but it's not overwhelming, and the smell is nice IMO.