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View Full Version : Pale White/Ginger Phenotype in Portugal?



Nqp15hhu
09-16-2019, 07:27 PM
Visiting the Algarve I notice a few (not all) pale white, freckle type Portuguese people. I often think that these are British tourists only for them to open their mouths and speak Portuguese.

Is this as a result of British shipwrecks/exploring years ago?

sgdavies@hotmail.com
09-16-2019, 07:32 PM
German, French, Scandinavian, Irish, Polish, Russian, etc etc, who have learned the lingo? This area is huge for tourism.

Ruderico
09-16-2019, 07:43 PM
There is a Portuguese section for this kind of question. But keep in mind that you have given no statistics or figures, so all this discussion will be pretty irrelevant and subjective.

That said, British shipwrecks is certainly not the explanation

spruithean
09-16-2019, 07:52 PM
Visiting the Algarve I notice a few (not all) pale white, freckle type Portuguese people. I often think that these are British tourists only for them to open their mouths and speak Portuguese.

Is this as a result of British shipwrecks/exploring years ago?

This phenotype is not isolated to Britain or Ireland. It's found throughout Europe with higher rates in the Isles and IIRC part of Russia.


German, French, Scandinavian, Irish, Polish, Russian, etc etc, who have learned the lingo? This area is huge for tourism.

Yeah it could be a tourist who speaks Portuguese, and again it could still be just one of those situations where the person just happens to be fair and have red hair.


There is a Portuguese section for this kind of question. But keep in mind that you have given no statistics or figures, so all this discussion will be pretty irrelevant and subjective.

That said, British shipwrecks is certainly not the explanation

Indeed.

Shadogowah
09-17-2019, 07:45 AM
Visiting the Algarve I notice a few (not all) pale white, freckle type Portuguese people. I often think that these are British tourists only for them to open their mouths and speak Portuguese.

Is this as a result of British shipwrecks/exploring years ago?

Ginger is a recessive allel and it will rarely express itself in populations where it is not common.

However it will show up among a small percentage of the population if there is a certain degree of endogamy. That is the case (I suspect) for Southern European rural areas that have been relatively isolated for some time where people marry people from the same town for centuries.

glentane
09-17-2019, 12:03 PM
Girlfriend went on a walking holiday in the Cinque Terre (Liguria), and was intrigued by the number of (extremely!) local locals who, according to her, "looked like you, Glentane".
That is, redhaired and corpse-coloured, with freckles.
I vaguely recall that on inquiry, the other locals jokingly referred to them as "pirates" or something like that.
These towns were notoriously difficult of access except by sea, so I'm with Shadogowah on the "restricted breeding pool" thing, hard up against what was once Cisalpine Gaul.

Those with a taste for adventure can wander off into the tales of ancient "historians", where the Ligurians are referred to as variously fighting against or actually encompassing the Ambrones. Although it's quite clear that the Ligurians themselves are fairly autochthonous, as much as any other European tribe/nation.


"...Ligurian tribes, now shorn, in ancient days

First of the long-haired nations, on whose necks
Once flowed the auburn locks in pride supreme." - Lucan

Milkyway
09-20-2019, 03:07 PM
Not necessarily. Redheads exist everywhere in Europe, although they're relatively rare outside the British Isles and Scandinavia. Red hair is usually accompanied by fair skin, light eyes and freckles.

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/41/9b/ea/419beab873c5388d794bf1153ca2a7e1.jpg