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View Full Version : Blood groups represent admixture?



newtoboard
01-07-2014, 12:52 PM
I have read something about different blood groups corresponding to admixture. For example blood group B in Europeans being a sign of East Eurasian admixture. Is there any weight to these theories?

Jean M
01-07-2014, 01:09 PM
http://anthro.palomar.edu/vary/vary_3.htm

geebee
01-07-2014, 03:10 PM
One problem with the question of where human blood types originated is the assumption that they originated in humans.

There is some evidence that A, B, and O alleles have existed for much longer than our species has. This is not to say that some alleles aren't much younger. There are, in fact, numerous A, B, and O alleles. These likely formed at different times, via different mechanisms -- including recombination, inversions, and point mutations.

But it is likely that A, B, and O alleles of some sort all existed in Africa before humans ever left.

Here are a couple of articles that bear on the issue:

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/human-blood-types-have-deep-evolutionary-roots

http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/genetics/ancient-dna-and-neanderthals/neanderthal-genes-red-hair-and-more

One quarrel I have with the second is the statement, "While the mutation that causes the human B blood group arose around 3.5 Ma, the O group mutation dates to around 1.15 Ma. Lalueza-Fox and colleagues (2008) tested whether Neanderthals had the O blood group."

Which O group mutation are they talking about? There is more than one mutation that can result in an O blood type. The most common is a deletion at rs8176747; but this is not the only one. [edit: It is, however, almost certainly the one they're referring to.] The mutation rs41302905 C -->T also causes loss of function in the ABO gene, and it is loss of function that makes an O allele -- not any specific mutation, except to the extent that the mutation causes the loss of function.

Interestingly, in the chart posted by Jean M, the peak distribution of the B blood type is not East Asia, but Central Asia. Of course, that doesn't mean it originated there. I would still think it likely that when humans left Africa, they already had all three blood types.

parasar
01-08-2014, 05:39 AM
I have read something about different blood groups corresponding to admixture. For example blood group B in Europeans being a sign of East Eurasian admixture. Is there any weight to these theories?

If I had not read what geebee had to say, based on the map at the link Jean posted, I would think B is correlated to Indo-Aryans!

"Only 16% of humanity have it" - from the map below (folk, please take into account the distorted Mercator projection and population density) it looks that the majority of B+ are northern South Asian
http://anthro.palomar.edu/vary/images/map_of_B_blood_in_the_world.gif

Palisto
01-11-2014, 09:13 PM
I have read something about different blood groups corresponding to admixture. For example blood group B in Europeans being a sign of East Eurasian admixture. Is there any weight to these theories?

Blood groups are older than human mankind, you can find blood groups in great apes as well. Its distribution is mostly caused by natural selection.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_%28non-human%29

Ian B
01-14-2014, 11:49 PM
Is there any correlation between Blood Groups and yDNA? For example, my Blood Gp is B+ and my yDNA Hpg D.

Gray Fox
01-15-2014, 12:21 AM
Is there any correlation between Blood Groups and yDNA? For example, my Blood Gp is B+ and my yDNA Hpg D.

There doesn't seem to be. I too am B+ and I belong to R1b. My Father and my Uncle are B+ as well. Though my cousin, the son of the B+ uncle, is O+. Seems pretty random amongst different haplogroups.

LUKE33
04-19-2014, 02:56 PM
There doesn't seem to be. I too am B+ and I belong to R1b. My Father and my Uncle are B+ as well. Though my cousin, the son of the B+ uncle, is O+. Seems pretty random amongst different haplogroups.

My father and brother are B+

Agamemnon
04-19-2014, 04:06 PM
My father and brother are B+

Me & my brother are B+ as well.

LUKE33
04-19-2014, 05:45 PM
http://www.bloodbook.com/index.html

For more information about blood.( groups and much more )

Stephen1986
04-20-2014, 01:53 AM
Both of my parents are O, my dad being O- and my mother being O+, which is what I have as well. I've seen blood type being used to categorise people for various things from diet to personality in Japan, so there's a lot of things associated with blood type that might not necessarily be true or accurate.

Ebizur
04-20-2014, 05:29 PM
Both of my parents are O, my dad being O- and my mother being O+, which is what I have as well. I've seen blood type being used to categorise people for various things from diet to personality in Japan, so there's a lot of things associated with blood type that might not necessarily be true or accurate.
There is no valid evidence for the idea that one's ABO blood type has any correlation with one's personality. The stereotypes associated with ABO blood types in East Asia seem to derive from pre-WWII Japanese racism. Type A, which is the most frequent among ethnic Japanese, was considered to indicate a "meticulous, diligent, nervous, intelligent, sophisticated" personality (Oh, how humble!). Type O, which is second most frequent among ethnic Japanese and also notably frequent among Taiwan aborigines (who were Japanese subjects at the time), was considered to indicate an "easygoing, complacent, generous, friendly, unmeticulous, haphazard" personality (the "perfect partner" for the type A stereotype). Type B, which is unusually frequent among Koreans, northern Chinese, and other people who the Japanese love to hate, was considered to indicate a "rough, violent, illogical, emotional, selfish, puerile" personality (based on Japanese stereotypes of those ethnic groups). Type AB, as a combination of one allele for type A and one allele for type B, was considered to represent an uneasy personality that was constantly torn between its meticulous, logical "type A" half and its rambunctious, emotional "type B" half.

parasar
04-20-2014, 07:17 PM
There is no valid evidence for the idea that one's ABO blood type has any correlation with one's personality. The stereotypes associated with ABO blood types in East Asia seem to derive from pre-WWII Japanese racism. Type A, which is the most frequent among ethnic Japanese, was considered to indicate a "meticulous, diligent, nervous, intelligent, sophisticated" personality (Oh, how humble!). Type O, which is second most frequent among ethnic Japanese and also notably frequent among Taiwan aborigines (who were Japanese subjects at the time), was considered to indicate an "easygoing, complacent, generous, friendly, unmeticulous, haphazard" personality (the "perfect partner" for the type A stereotype). Type B, which is unusually frequent among Koreans, northern Chinese, and other people who the Japanese love to hate, was considered to indicate a "rough, violent, illogical, emotional, selfish, puerile" personality (based on Japanese stereotypes of those ethnic groups). Type AB, as a combination of one allele for type A and one allele for type B, was considered to represent an uneasy personality that was constantly torn between its meticulous, logical "type A" half and its rambunctious, emotional "type B" half.

Brings to mind an NYT article on Japanese baseball players!


Robertson added that people with Type B, known as hunters, are said to be highly independent and creative.

And creative would be a good adjective to describe Suzuki at the plate, where he sprays the ball to all fields and sometimes seems to hit the ball to an exact spot. Suzuki set the major league record for hits in a season with 262 in 2004.

“Even in Japan, Ichiro was kind of a maverick baseball player in the sense of being very philosophical and very meticulous,” Robertson said. “People with Type B are individuals and they find their own way in life.”


Blood, Sweat and Type O: Japan's Weird Science
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/14/sports/baseball/14blood.html