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3K.
09-20-2019, 10:47 PM
Stumbled across this; thought it might interest some of y'all. For more: https://www.youtube.com/user/yiddishbookcenter/videos?disable_polymer=1


1. "Yiddish Belongs to All": What to Do with Thousands of Yiddish Books?


Liora Rapoport—coordinator of library renovation project at CIM-ORT (Jewish School of Mexico City)—explains the principal criteria for deciding where and to what organizations to send books during project: What are we doing for Yiddish?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdne1rpby_E
2. Class Structure among Early Ashkenazi Jewish Immigrants in Mexico City's Centro


Jaya Torenberg—the former director of the Colegio Israelita de Mexico, a Yiddish school founded in 1924 in Mexico City—discusses the class structure of early Ashkenazi Jews in downtown Mexico City in the 1920s and '30s.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QEuEhoyTk0
3. "It's a Dead Language and It Sounds Like German": My Mother's Reaction to My Singing Yiddish


Lenka Lichtenberg, Czech-Canadian Jewish singer, explains why her mother didn't approve of her connecting to Jewish traditions and singing in Yiddish.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0V9oZCiTQvk
4. About Arele: Yiddish Textbooks for Children


Frida Grapa de Cielak, author of the Arele Yiddish learning book series for children, talks about her dedication in Arele. She also explains a little about how she organized and designed the books.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsoDqwtw-sE
5. Changes in Mexican Jewish Communal Life


Liora Rapoport—coordinator of library renovation project at CIM-ORT (Jewish School of Mexico City)—describes transformation of school hymn in order to be more inclusive of all sectors and subsets of the Mexican Jewish community (Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Halebi, and Shami Jews).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7evF72vWiNk

3K.
09-20-2019, 11:03 PM
Most common type of comment I read in this section is:

"I'd love to start learning Yiddish. After all, it's one of my ancestral languages!"
And it's funny but—and this strictly my opinion, my hot take, so if you like Yiddish and want to learn Yiddish now's your chance to look away—I'd rather learn Ladino and Hebrew - if any language - than Yiddish so I fully agree with the 3rd's mother's patrician conclusion. It's a Germanic pidgin that ought to stay in the annals of history where it belongs; a linguistic curiosity of a bygone era, if you will.

passenger
09-20-2019, 11:19 PM
Most common type of comment I read in this section is:

And it's funny but—and this strictly my opinion, my hot take, so if you like Yiddish and want to learn Yiddish now's your chance to look away—I'd rather learn Ladino and Hebrew - if any language - than Yiddish so I fully agree with the 3rd's mother's patrician conclusion. It's a Germanic pidgin that ought to stay in the annals of history where it belongs; a linguistic curiosity of a bygone era, if you will.

Tell that to the Chasidim.

Personally I've never felt particularly drawn to learn Yiddish, but I do love Yiddish music and I'm sad that both Yiddish and Ladino were lost in my family. I'm not sure I would invest my time in incorporating them in my own life, but I respect those who continue to cultivate their use and memory.

StillWater
09-20-2019, 11:27 PM
Most common type of comment I read in this section is:

And it's funny but—and this strictly my opinion, my hot take, so if you like Yiddish and want to learn Yiddish now's your chance to look away—I'd rather learn Ladino and Hebrew - if any language - than Yiddish so I fully agree with the 3rd's mother's patrician conclusion. It's a Germanic pidgin that ought to stay in the annals of history where it belongs; a linguistic curiosity of a bygone era, if you will.

Why one diaspora creole over another, especially given that you're Ashkenazi?

3K.
09-21-2019, 12:42 AM
Tell that to the Chasidim.
Indeed, humorous!
I am thinking it never crosses their mind what language they use, really. That meta-linguistical blind-spot that monolingual users have overpowers mine, your, or any secular person's preference what language they find or not find attractive enough to learn. Hasidim's utilitarian use of Yiddish is understandable but "reconnecting" with roots -- once again, in my book; please don't be a StillWater and generously lift me up as the speaker of all Ashkenazim because again, I can't speak for anyone else but myself here -- is learning Aramaic, the least.

Why one diaspora creole over another, especially given that you're Ashkenazi?
I like how it sounds; always have. It's not like I am going to learn either though so don't worry, big boy.

Seabass
09-21-2019, 12:52 AM
I'd rather learn Ladino and Hebrew - if any language - than Yiddish

Hebrew I understand but why Ladino? Ladino music is mostly pretty slow and depressive (for good reasons) and every time I show a native Spanish speaker videos of a Ladino speaking person, they are cringing as if its an adult speaking like a 4 year old.

passenger
09-21-2019, 01:54 AM
Hebrew I understand but why Ladino? Ladino music is mostly pretty slow and depressive (for good reasons) and every time I show a native Spanish speaker videos of a Ladino speaking person, they are cringing as if its an adult speaking like a 4 year old.

What videos have you been showing them? Unfortunately a lot of the recordings out there on the net are of elderly people who speak both slowly because of their age and haltingly because it's often been a long time since they spoke Ladino regularly and they can't always recall all the words. Also, Ladino is essentially like late medieval Spanish, so naturally it will sound strangely archaic and/or rural to speakers of most modern varieties of Spanish. I personally find it quite pleasant sounding and easy to understand. As for the music, that's a matter of taste, but there are a few good ones even among the classics, like "Siete modos".

passenger
09-21-2019, 02:29 AM
Indeed, humorous!
I am thinking it never crosses their mind what language they use, really. That meta-linguistical blind-spot that monolingual users have overpowers mine, your, or any secular person's preference what language they find or not find attractive enough to learn. Hasidim's utilitarian use of Yiddish is understandable but "reconnecting" with roots -- once again, in my book; please don't be a StillWater and generously lift me up as the speaker of all Ashkenazim because again, I can't speak for anyone else but myself here -- is learning Aramaic, the least.

You're obviously free to pick whatever language speaks to you. Like I said, I haven't personally made the choice to learn Yiddish. But what's curious is that you feel the need to pick on Yiddish specifically as if it's an inherently less worthy language. People often don't like the sound, for the same reason many English speakers dislike the sound of German. Or they might find that the language is simply a quaint, folksy language that doesn't lend itself to "great literature" and isn't endowed with any special cultural value. It's the latter that I find problematic. Yiddish may not be particularly practical, but neither is Ladino, and certainly not Aramaic. You study them precisely because you want to connect with elements of a culture which has been mostly, if not completely, relegated to the past. So if you're not dismissing the study of impractical languages in general, but specifically Yiddish, it's because you're dismissing Yiddish culture, and that I take issue with. You're certainly not obliged to care about that culture, but I don't see why you have to express particular disdain for it, especially since you went to the trouble of starting a thread with videos about it.

jonahst
09-22-2019, 03:45 AM
Most common type of comment I read in this section is:

And it's funny but—and this strictly my opinion, my hot take, so if you like Yiddish and want to learn Yiddish now's your chance to look away—I'd rather learn Ladino and Hebrew - if any language - than Yiddish so I fully agree with the 3rd's mother's patrician conclusion. It's a Germanic pidgin that ought to stay in the annals of history where it belongs; a linguistic curiosity of a bygone era, if you will.

I used to feel this way when I was younger, but as I've gotten older I've come to appreciate the depth and beauty of Yiddish. It's so rich. And I'm not sure Ladino is any different from Yiddish in any of these respects or what you mentioned, but I appreciate its Mediterranean appeal. I think that they, along with other Jewish diaspora languages, are immensely valuable, but Modern Hebrew is the future lingua franca for world Jewry. I think it's best to enhance Modern Hebrew with the wisdom and beauty of these older languages that have few(er) modern speakers.