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Milkyway
10-01-2019, 11:38 PM
Dog vision (they're near-sighted):

https://media.mnn.com/assets/images/2017/11/chow-2.png.638x0_q80_crop-smart.png

Cat vision:

https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/525e9e64eab8ead141928c02-750-375.jpg

Horse vision:

https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2018/10/10/50582-large.jpeg

Parrot vision (everything is so full of colors):

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-3ecf71340194dede481d9c0c9f078b94.webp

Snake vision (they can detect thermal radiation much like mosquitoes):

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/5e/99/ef/5e99efa648eb35bb684ac3347e394d9a.png

Bee vision (they're more sensitive to UV light than humans):

https://ecocolmena.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/bee-vision-5jpg.jpg

Rat vision (they're near-sighted, much like dogs):

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-400513e6e8aa8e35664eb729429f715a.webp


Do you know more examples?

Censored
10-01-2019, 11:56 PM
Cats have much sharper vision than human beings even if they cant see color.

Milkyway
10-02-2019, 09:08 AM
Researcher discovers how mosquitoes integrate vision and smell to track victims


While scientists understand a lot about the mosquito's sense of smell and how it targets CO2 exhalations to find their hosts, very little is known about how the mosquito uses vision.

Vinauger discovered that the interaction between the olfactory and visual processing centers of mosquitoes' brains is what helps these insects target their victims so accurately.

These findings were recently published in the journal Current Biology.

When mosquitoes encounter CO2, they become attracted to dark, visual objects, such as their hosts. What this new study shows is that CO2 affects the responses of neurons in mosquitoes' visual centers, to helps them track visual objects with a greater accuracy.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/vt-rdh072219.php
https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(19)30770-5?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com %2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982219307705%3Fshowall%3D true

Milkyway
10-02-2019, 09:14 AM
Cats have much sharper vision than human beings even if they cant see color.

I've noticed that dogs (and presumably cats as well) pay a lot of attention to movement. It seems that dogs can identify their owners from a considerable distance (like 100 meters away) by the way they walk.

Stone Meadow
10-02-2019, 01:39 PM
I've noticed that dogs (and presumably cats as well) pay a lot of attention to movement. It seems that dogs can identify their owners from a considerable distance (like 100 meters away) by the way they walk.

Anecdote is not data, but here's my experience. When I arrive home in the evening I park at the foot of the ~100 meter drive to collect the mail. While collecting the mail my dog, a 9-year old Labrador Retriever, moves from the carport to the head of the drive and starts barking at me. If I call to him he stops barking and starts wagging his tail before trotting down to greet me. If I do not call to him he continues to bark until I drive to within 20-30 meters of him, when he stops barking and starts wagging his tail. Same thing if he sees me walking from further than about 20 meters; he barks until I move closer or call his name. This is 'alarm/warning' barking, not 'I'm happy to see you barking'. He's done this all his life, and as a consequence I've often wondered how good his vision really is.

Milkyway
10-02-2019, 02:02 PM
Anecdote is not data, but here's my experience. When I arrive home in the evening I park at the foot of the ~100 meter drive to collect the mail. While collecting the mail my dog, a 9-year old Labrador Retriever, moves from the carport to the head of the drive and starts barking at me. If I call to him he stops barking and starts wagging his tail before trotting down to greet me. If I do not call to him he continues to bark until I drive to within 20-30 meters of him, when he stops barking and starts wagging his tail. Same thing if he sees me walking from further than about 20 meters; he barks until I move closer or call his name. This is 'alarm/warning' barking, not 'I'm happy to see you barking'. He's done this all his life, and as a consequence I've often wondered how good his vision really is.

My Labrador is almost blind (she's also old, more than 11 years old). The other day I was pointing to a tennis ball that was less than 2 meters away from her. Apparently, she couldn't see it. It was only when I took the ball and hold it in front of her that she started wagging her tail and barking. I deduced she can't see objects (at least not clearly) if they're more than 1 meter away and don't move.

Censored
10-02-2019, 04:23 PM
I've noticed that dogs (and presumably cats as well) pay a lot of attention to movement. It seems that dogs can identify their owners from a considerable distance (like 100 meters away) by the way they walk.

It might be their sense of smell playing a role in that as well.

Helen
10-02-2019, 07:21 PM
Different types of dog vary a lot. My Cocker spaniels seem very short sighted and totally nose orientated they smell a cat a few yards away but if it does not move they do not get where it is. My neighbour's lurcher can see a cat sitting still at about 50m away and goes potty.

Milkyway
10-03-2019, 11:16 AM
Which person is my trainer? Spontaneous visual discrimination of human individuals by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)


Abstract

Bottlenose dolphins are known to use signature whistles to identify conspecifics auditorily. However, the way in which they recognize individuals visually is less well known. We investigated their visual recognition of familiar human individuals under the spontaneous discrimination task. In each trial, the main trainer appeared from behind a panel. In test trials, two persons (one was the main trainer) appeared from the left and right sides of the panel and moved along the poolside in opposite directions. Three of the four dolphins spontaneously followed their main trainers significantly above the level of chance. Subsequent tests, however, revealed that when the two persons wore identical clothing, the following response deteriorated. This suggests that dolphins can spontaneously discriminate human individuals using visual cues, but they do not utilize facial cues, but body area for this discrimination.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4502054/

bonfirepumpkins
12-10-2019, 11:34 PM
Cats have much sharper vision than human beings even if they cant see color.

I thought that indoor cats are nearsighted and outdoor cats are farsighted.