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Anglecynn
01-27-2014, 10:42 PM
Found this video (as well as this channel) interesting:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsqrlaIef2o

David Mc
01-27-2014, 11:49 PM
Very interesting! This kind of experimental archaeology has challenged a number of widely held assumptions in the archaeological community about what uses different types of arms and armour were put to. Far too often, martial finds have been tagged as "for ceremonial use," when they would have been wonderfully effective on the battle field. Another presupposition that came crashing down recently was the belief that bronze was inherently inferior to iron. For more info on the latter point, look at Barry Molloy's work on the Bronze Age warfare with University College Dublin.

Anglecynn
01-28-2014, 12:26 AM
Very interesting! This kind of experimental archaeology has challenged a number of widely held assumptions in the archaeological community about what uses different types of arms and armour were put to. Far too often, martial finds have been tagged as "for ceremonial use," when they would have been wonderfully effective on the battle field. Another presupposition that came crashing down recently was the belief that bronze was inherently inferior to iron. For more info on the latter point, look at Barry Molloy's work on the Bronze Age warfare with University College Dublin.

I shall do! Thanks for the information.

I remember reading on the website of a man (I'll have to double check his name, he's a UK-based bronzesmith) who creates and (has) tested bronze age weaponry against each other and against later technology, and one of the things he said was that bronze can be quite strong upon impact, and that most of his bronze weapons were a match for most iron weapons in many respects.

Yeah i think experimental archaeology is very important to understanding the past. You know five centuries from now ten guys can sit around trying to decide whether plastic cutlery was symbolic or for practical use and write lengthy articles on the subject, but until they tuck into it and try it i guess they won't know for sure, as they until then they are not experiencing the objects in the same way that the people that made them did.

If i had a lot of money to throw around, i'd love to set up small settlements (or even individual farmsteads) from different periods, and employ people to live there year round. Could write up reports on how they found ways of dealing with certain aspects of life, which bits were tough, which bits weren't, anything unexpected, what works, what doesn't etc. Would be a tall ask for whoever was involved but it could lead to some interesting revelations.

David Mc
01-28-2014, 12:53 AM
Hi Anglecynn. You're thinking of Neil Burridge. Neil, who is based out of Cornwall, reproduces the most historically accurate bronze age weaponry you can find today-- I have some of his work myself. You can see his work here: Bronze Age Swords (http://www.bronze-age-swords.com/). He's done a number of tests with weapons and shields (both bronze and leather).

alan
01-28-2014, 01:27 AM
There was a series in the 70s or early 80s which I think was called Living in the Past and followed a group of people who living in the Iron Age (in round huts, farming etc) for a full year. There was a book about it too.



I shall do! Thanks for the information.

I remember reading on the website of a man (I'll have to double check his name, he's a UK-based bronzesmith) who creates and (has) tested bronze age weaponry against each other and against later technology, and one of the things he said was that bronze can be quite strong upon impact, and that most of his bronze weapons were a match for most iron weapons in many respects.

Yeah i think experimental archaeology is very important to understanding the past. You know five centuries from now ten guys can sit around trying to decide whether plastic cutlery was symbolic or for practical use and write lengthy articles on the subject, but until they tuck into it and try it i guess they won't know for sure, as they until then they are not experiencing the objects in the same way that the people that made them did.

If i had a lot of money to throw around, i'd love to set up small settlements (or even individual farmsteads) from different periods, and employ people to live there year round. Could write up reports on how they found ways of dealing with certain aspects of life, which bits were tough, which bits weren't, anything unexpected, what works, what doesn't etc. Would be a tall ask for whoever was involved but it could lead to some interesting revelations.

alan
01-28-2014, 01:29 AM
This is some sort of retrospective of Living in the Past

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQ0O4-dHhE

I would love to go to the Glastonbury Festival, arrive about a month early and build a round house :-)

Anglecynn
01-28-2014, 01:34 AM
Hi Anglecynn. You're thinking of Neil Burridge. Neil, who is based out of Cornwall, reproduces the most historically accurate bronze age weaponry you can find today-- I have some of his work myself. You can see his work here: Bronze Age Swords (http://www.bronze-age-swords.com/). He's done a number of tests with weapons and shields (both bronze and leather).

That's him! Thanks for the reminder.

David Mc
01-28-2014, 01:45 AM
There was a series in the 70s or early 80s which I think was called Living in the Past and followed a group of people who living in the Iron Age (in round huts, farming etc) for a full year. There was a book about it too.

Thanks. There was a similar show that the BBC made in 2001: "Surviving the Iron Age." I seem to recall it got a bit silly at times, but it was an interesting experiment.

Anglecynn
01-28-2014, 02:25 AM
This is some sort of retrospective of Living in the Past

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQ0O4-dHhE

I would love to go to the Glastonbury Festival, arrive about a month early and build a round house :-)

Wish i could find a video or dvd of that series somewhere, ah well. Cheers for the link to the video.

alan
01-28-2014, 11:45 AM
I think its been wiped. I think there are some comments to that effect below the clip. Real shame but the BBC have wiped a lot of good stuff. There was a book about it.


Wish i could find a video or dvd of that series somewhere, ah well. Cheers for the link to the video.

Anglecynn
01-28-2014, 02:10 PM
I think its been wiped. I think there are some comments to that effect below the clip. Real shame but the BBC have wiped a lot of good stuff. There was a book about it.

Gah, i bet somebody somewhere recorded it. Don't understand how they could wipe that. They could have at least sold it to somebody, ah well.