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spruithean
05-06-2020, 02:35 PM
Interesting read, and perhaps a distraction from the present: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/04/28/1919423117

slievenamon
05-06-2020, 05:56 PM
Interesting read, and perhaps a distraction from the present: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/04/28/1919423117

A pleasant distraction...quite informative.
Thank you spruithean

Piquerobi
05-11-2020, 10:15 PM
Very interesting! I did not know lions once inhabited North America:


During the Pleistocene, lions ranged over an enormous geographic expanse. This included modern lions (Panthera leo leo) in Eurasia, the cave lion (Panthera leo spelaea) in Eurasia, Alaska, and Yukon, as well as the American lion (Panthera leo atrox) in North America. At present, their range is mostly restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa, along with one small, isolated population of Asiatic lions in the Kathiawar Peninsula of Gujarat State in India. The global decline of lion populations started with the extinction of the cave and American lions in the Late Pleistocene, ca. 14,000 y ago (2). More recently, modern lion populations have disappeared from southwestern Eurasia (19th and 20th century) and North Africa (20th century) (Fig. 1A), likely as a result of anthropogenic factors (3, 4). In the last 150 y, this decline has resulted in the extinction in the wild of the Barbary lion in North Africa, the Cape lion in South Africa, lion populations in the Middle East, and has led to increased fragmentation and decline of all of the remaining populations.

This is how it probably looked like:


It was about 25% larger than the modern lion, making it one of the largest known felids.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_lion

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