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View Full Version : Is there evidence of blondism at Afanasievo or early Tarim inhabitants?



Vratyas
02-21-2014, 07:54 PM
Since the crania from afanasievo cluster with lower volga and since the cultural equipment of Afanasievo is very similar to the Repin culture and Afansaievo started around 3500BC it will be a good indication if proto-indo-europeans had blond hair if we can show that afanasievo people had blond hair or the early inhabitants of the tarim basin that were R1a before the R1b people showed up. The beauty of Loulan seems to have had dark hair. Also there is no evidence of farming in the steppes at that time so it doesnt make sense that steppe people would have depigmented due to lack of vitamin D. Did blondism come from cucuteni-tripolye or later from boat axe people near estonia or lithuania?

alan
02-21-2014, 08:45 PM
Also there is no evidence of farming in the steppes at that time so it doesnt make sense that steppe people would have depigmented due to lack of vitamin D. Did blondism come from cucuteni-tripolye or later from boat axe people near estonia or lithuania?

That is a good point you raise. I imagine too that the steppe had a lot more sunlight than wooded areas or the much more cloudy area of NW Europe.

I dont think hair colour really brings any actual advantages beyond preference. The way I see it blonde hair is a very different thing from red hair and should never be lumped together as 'light' hair. Red hair is down to having two copies of the MC1R gene that one copy is enough to cause fair skin. So, red hair seems like a byproduct of the rise of a gene for very fair skin. Blonde hair is not as far as I know directly linked to skin colour - probably why you see many blondes in Scandinavia with tanned skin but its distinctly weird if you see a tanned redhead.

My belief is Red hair probably arose in the north Sea area as a byproduct of a selection for very fair skin. As for timing, the Mesolithic was the great era of forests and presumably very low sunlight exposure except along the coasts. On the other hand they did have a hunter-fishers diet which also counteracted the ill effects. I do think thought that it should not be forgotten that even hunter fishers in north-west Europe had seasons of scarcity when sea fish were in deeper water and the runs of salmon, trout etc were over. Also, its a well known phenomenon that animals in winter suffer and lose a lot of their dietary value, fat etc and it is possible to starve to death eating lots of meat from winter-lean animals. So, while farming does provide one scenario it is not impossible that selection might have been a factor in the Mesolithic.

Blonde hair is centred more towards the Baltic and doesnt seem to be linked directly to skin. So, I think unlike the red hair/very fair skin selection to the west, there is no obvious functional selective reason for blonde hair. I suspect something like neoteny may be at play as adult blonde hair is relatively rare but the majority of infants are light haired in the northern half of Europe. Adult blonde hair just seems to be a stretching of the age span of blondism to me.

ADW_1981
02-21-2014, 09:17 PM
First and foremost I don't believe depigmentation has to do with blonde hair. It's actually red hair mutations which are linked with depigmentation genes. That said, I would agree that the countries with higher rates of blonde, fine hair do have higher rates of R1a though. Whether or not the two are linked, I'm not certain.

Grossvater
02-21-2014, 09:41 PM
Red hair is down to having two copies of the MC1R gene that one copy is enough to cause fair skin. So, red hair seems like a byproduct of the rise of a gene for very fair skin. Blonde hair is not as far as I know directly linked to skin colour - probably why you see many blondes in Scandinavia with tanned skin but its distinctly weird if you see a tanned redhead.



I wonder about this. I once had a student whose mother had an Irish surname and had flaming red hair. My student's father was African-American. This student married a blond, blue-eyed boy of Western European extraction. These two had a son with rather dark caramel colored skin, blue eyes, African features, and bright flaming red, kinky-curly hair.

lgmayka
02-22-2014, 11:20 AM
I suspect something like neoteny may be at play as adult blonde hair is relatively rare but the majority of infants are light haired in the northern half of Europe. Adult blonde hair just seems to be a stretching of the age span of blondism to me.
If so, then blondism has, to a weaker degree, the same advantage as blue eyes: making a person appear younger and less threatening--and therefore more sympathetic, approachable, and inviting. Society's preference for blonde women (and nowadays, even blond men) has been well-known ever since the invention of peroxide. :) Haven't experts advised women looking for a job or a spouse--and nowadays, men too--to bleach their hair (at least to a lighter shade of brown)? Similarly, I think that 30 years from now experts will be advising such young people to wear blue contact lenses or even undergo laser iris depigmentation (http://www.medicaldaily.com/brown-eyes-turn-blue-new-laser-procedure-may-permanently-change-eye-color-video-245514).

leonardo
02-22-2014, 01:00 PM
I do believe there is a positive correlation between those who have red and blond hair. This article seems to confirm this: http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/MC1R.

rms2
02-22-2014, 03:49 PM
If so, then blondism has, to a weaker degree, the same advantage as blue eyes: making a person appear younger and less threatening--and therefore more sympathetic, approachable, and inviting. Society's preference for blonde women (and nowadays, even blond men) has been well-known ever since the invention of peroxide. :) Haven't experts advised women looking for a job or a spouse--and nowadays, men too--to bleach their hair (at least to a lighter shade of brown)? Similarly, I think that 30 years from now experts will be advising such young people to wear blue contact lenses or even undergo laser iris depigmentation (http://www.medicaldaily.com/brown-eyes-turn-blue-new-laser-procedure-may-permanently-change-eye-color-video-245514).

Maybe blond hair is less threatening, but there is a certain type of blue eyes that is crazy-cold looking and far more threatening than any set of brown eyes I have ever seen.

Táltos
02-23-2014, 01:42 AM
Maybe blond hair is less threatening, but there is a certain type of blue eyes that is crazy-cold looking and far more threatening than any set of brown eyes I have ever seen.

Yep I have to agree with you there are certain scary looking blue eyes. Not all of them though. :-) Maybe also tied in to the old Evil Eye? Look in the section about around the world. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evil_eye

I also want to add I wouldn't trade my dark hair and eyes for anything!