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DMXX
08-29-2012, 04:08 PM
C3b Y Chromosome DNA Test Results Point to Native American Deep Ancestry, Relatedness, among United States and Canadian Study Participants
Rundquist: C3b Y DNA Study 8/12

The most interesting part of the paper in my opinion:



For the descendants of person of interest Germain Doucet who participated in the study, the evidence is clear: Germain Doucet, born approximately 1641 in Nova Scotia, was of Native American, paternal-line ancestry, and his father, therefore, would have been a Native American. For all study participants, a C3b haplogroup subclade has been confirmed by way of DNA testing, such that each would have a Native American paternalline ancestry as well. Further analysis has shown that descendants of Germain Doucet are highly likely to have shared a common, paternal line ancestor in the past twelve generations ...


[Link (http://familyheritageresearchcommunity.org/Amerindian%20Ancestry%20C3b%20Y%20DNA%20Analysis.p df)]

Though the sample size is at risk of sampling bias (14 participants), it's interesting to see one surname to have maintained a strong association with NA genetic heritage for more than 350 years.

A phylogenetic tree would have been quite useful in visualising the clustering patterns between Doucet vs. non-Doucet Y-DNA C3b's.

Spark
08-29-2012, 05:44 PM
Though the sample size is at risk of sampling bias (14 participants), it's interesting to see one surname to have maintained a strong association with NA genetic heritage for more than 350 years.

There are certain surnames which are often heard in Indian Country. It's sort of hard to explain this peculiarity, but they are often signs of regional placement in one's family. In the U.S., these are anglicized tribal names or straight-up Scottish or Scots-Irish names adopted or carried by Amerindians among many others. The surname Ross is one such example -- many Rosses who I know descend from the Southeast have some sort of detectable tribal ancestry. Ross is also a common Cherokee surname and was carried by Chief John Ross, a Cherokee leader of mixed ancestry, and his descendants.

AppalachianGumbo
08-31-2012, 11:49 PM
There are certain surnames which are often heard in Indian Country. It's sort of hard to explain this peculiarity, but they are often signs of regional placement in one's family. In the U.S., these are anglicized tribal names or straight-up Scottish or Scots-Irish names adopted or carried by Amerindians among many others. The surname Ross is one such example -- many Rosses who I know descend from the Southeast have some sort of detectable tribal ancestry. Ross is also a common Cherokee surname and was carried by Chief John Ross, a Cherokee leader of mixed ancestry, and his descendants.

What is interesting to note, his surname *Ross* was from his father who was Scotch, his father Daniel Ross. He is Ross by Scotch blood. John Ross's ancestry was 1/8 Cherokee by way of his mother, Mollie McDonald, her father (John McDonald) was Scotch. Mollie was 1/4 Cherokee, her mother Anna Shorey was 1/2 Cherokee and her mother, Ghigooie a fullblooded Cherokee (Bird Clan). Ross descendants are found most common in the Cherokee Nation of OK.

Regional placement..... If your ancestor was last named Ross born in Indian territory in 1891 where Cherokees were located in OK after the removal, then you may have a Cherokee ancestor. I think many people see surnames associated with Cherokees and believe they have a Cherokee ancestor, in some cases. Many Cherokees, especial due to admixture with Europeans, carried English/Scotch/Irish surnames because in many cases, the father was European and the mother was Cherokee.