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slievenamon
04-03-2021, 03:20 PM
A medieval fruit, with an odd name.
Its unknown, but will hopefully make it's acquaintance.
Quite different...

http://https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210325-the-strange-medieval-fruit-the-world-forgot (https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20210325-the-strange-medieval-fruit-the-world-forgot)

dosas
04-03-2021, 03:31 PM
It's quite common in Greece, I have one in my garden but I never pick the fruit, my grandma used to make jam from those, but I find the taste sour and tart.

jdean
04-03-2021, 03:35 PM
Had one growing in the garden but a fungus (which also got our quince tree) took hold so no more unfortunately.

Misses struggled a bit with it but I read recently that the best way of dealing with it is to boil it up with sugar (like jam) but only keep the liquor which presumably could be turned into a jelly afterwards.

Andrewid
04-03-2021, 06:19 PM
This tree is grown widely in Cyprus, where its fruit is eaten. There are two varieties known in Cypriot Greek: mespila (a larger fruit which can be eaten when ripe) and mosfila (a smaller, more tangy fruit, which is made into jam). The fruit is known as mousmoula in standard Greek, musmula in Turkish. The Brits know it as 'medlars' (though don't expect anyone to know what you're talking about when you mention them) and its botanical name is mespilus germanica. Note how close the Cypriot Greek name is to the botanical!

Here is a picture of the one in my English garden. It's of the mespila variety.

https://i.imgur.com/W3bfzXx.png

The tree produced an abundant crop during 2020. They are delicious btw, and the leafage of the bush itself keeps an English garden evergreen even in the middle of winter.

jdean
04-03-2021, 06:26 PM
and mosfila (a smaller, more tangy fruit, which is made into jam)

Bought a jar of that years ago from a Cypriot corner shop in London, it was lovely but I always wondered what it was made from since it didn't taste like anything I knew : )

slievenamon
04-03-2021, 06:33 PM
Lovely...form and function
I'm fond of evergreens.
Especially ones that provide food...
Thanks for the picture, Andrewid

jdean
04-03-2021, 10:25 PM
mespila (a larger fruit which can be eaten when ripe) and mosfila (a smaller, more tangy fruit, which is made into jam)


Bought a jar of that years ago from a Cypriot corner shop in London, it was lovely but I always wondered what it was made from since it didn't taste like anything I knew : )

When I bought that jar, which was what we call a jelly, a clear strained jam, I developed the impression it might have been made from a strain of Hawthorn berry but the site I got that from wasn't in English and I wasn't overly convinced with the translation that came back (it was a long time ago), however using Google with the extra information you provided I think this fruit is related to our Hawthorn but goes by the name Mediterranean Medlar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crataegus_azarolus)

Either way it makes a lovely preserve : )

Whilst on the subject of jams etc, the Italians and Spanish make a fantastic marmalade using Bergamot oranges (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergamot_orange) as long as you can cope with a mouthful of perfume : )