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TigerMW
05-19-2021, 06:22 PM
I've been following what's going on with some of the changes to member of the R-U152 haplotree over on that thread so I took a look at some of the other large P312 projects. They vary size so I thought I'd calculate the percentage penetration of Big Y results to total members. Here are the numbers.
R-DF27 - 59%
R-L21 - 52%
R-U152 - 46%

DF27 has 4154 members and is second to L21's 9674. I think DF27 will eventually surpass L21.

Dewsloth
05-19-2021, 06:55 PM
Meanwhile, back at tiny P312> DF19 :lol:

R-DF19 - 1003 kits in Big Y blocktree; 541 in the Group Project; 382 completed Big Y 70.6% :beerchug::cheer2:

Webb
05-19-2021, 08:18 PM
I've been following what's going on with some of the changes to member of the R-U152 haplotree over on that thread so I took a look at some of the other large P312 projects. They vary size so I thought I'd calculate the percentage penetration of Big Y results to total members. Here are the numbers.
R-DF27 - 59%
R-L21 - 52%
R-U152 - 46%

DF27 has 4154 members and is second to L21's 9674. I think DF27 will eventually surpass L21.

That was the plan that was revealed at the last DF27 Summit. After the plan of DF27 domination was unveiled, Razyn could be heard laughing maniacally via Skype.

TigerMW
05-19-2021, 09:48 PM
Meanwhile, back at tiny P312> DF19 :lol:

R-DF19 - 1003 kits in Big Y blocktree; 541 in the Group Project; 382 completed Big Y 70.6% :beerchug::cheer2:
Yes, DF19 is the king of Big Y.

razyn
05-20-2021, 01:54 AM
After the plan of DF27 domination was unveiled, Razyn could be heard laughing maniacally via Skype.

I thought we were friends. This is deeply hurtful.

I was heard laughing maniacally via Zoom!

razyn
06-04-2021, 12:46 PM
DF27 has 4154 members and is second to L21's 9674. I think DF27 will eventually surpass L21.

I've mentioned it before, but DF27 was discovered late, compared with those other big groups. Anyway this year sees the tenth anniversary of Z196 (now usually called Z195, an equivalent that's easier to test), plus several of its major subdivisions, in April-May 2011; and later, the October 2011 discovery (and November announcement on DNA-Forums, by Rich Rocca) of DF27 itself. A good many other ancient haplogroups were newly identified in 2011 (but have entered the literature since that date), thanks to the analysis of 1000 Genomes Project data by a team of citizen scientists. To see what the R1b branches looked like before those volunteers did their basic work, check out the ISOGG tree as of November, 2010. https://isogg.org/tree/2010/ISOGG_HapgrpR10.html

I wasn't part of that team, but as a complete DNA newb I took advantage of their new discoveries just about as soon as FTDNA offered the tests making that possible. A Z196 SNP test by Sanger sequencing was offered in May. I had just received my results for the "Deep Clade" test (ordered March 14, completed May 8), and was negative for everything below P312. Having no other good options, on May 17 I ordered SNP tests for L238 and Z196. The latter came back positive, May 27. Vince Tilroe was charting the negative and positive results for Z196 on a DNA-Forums thread, and mine was the fifth positive result (not including the 1000 Genomes results, in which it had been discovered). I think I was in the second, possibly the third small batch tested for it.

As the importance of Z195/Z196 came to be better known (at first, to FTDNA clients and DNA-Forums readers), I became something of a missionary for testing it; and as part of that effort, I posted a little sketch of its testing history on Eupedia. That turned out to be lucky, since DNA-Forums shut down quite abruptly in the fall of 2011 with virtually no discussion of the newly discovered DF27. I recovered that brief narrative, and posted it here; by now that has had nearly 4,000 views, so I guess it was worth doing. I'll drop the url for its second, more comprehensible entry. https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?11380-Way-back-when-P312*-started-looking-like-Z196-until-DF27-was-discovered&p=271372&viewfull=1#post271372

But mainly I want to wish DF27>Z196, its sons and nephews a Happy 10th Anniversary -- starting a couple of months ago, and continuing into 2012. After that, Anthrogenica fired up, and you can track subsequent, ongoing refinements in the phylogeny using the internal search functions here.

Webb
06-04-2021, 02:40 PM
I've mentioned it before, but DF27 was discovered late, compared with those other big groups. Anyway this year sees the tenth anniversary of Z196 (now usually called Z195, an equivalent that's easier to test), plus several of its major subdivisions, in April-May 2011; and later, the October 2011 discovery (and November announcement on DNA-Forums, by Rich Rocca) of DF27 itself. A good many other ancient haplogroups were newly identified in 2011 (but have entered the literature since that date), thanks to the analysis of 1000 Genomes Project data by a team of citizen scientists. To see what the R1b branches looked like before those volunteers did their basic work, check out the ISOGG tree as of November, 2010. https://isogg.org/tree/2010/ISOGG_HapgrpR10.html

I wasn't part of that team, but as a complete DNA newb I took advantage of their new discoveries just about as soon as FTDNA offered the tests making that possible. A Z196 SNP test by Sanger sequencing was offered in May. I had just received my results for the "Deep Clade" test (ordered March 14, completed May 8), and was negative for everything below P312. Having no other good options, on May 17 I ordered SNP tests for L238 and Z196. The latter came back positive, May 27. Vince Tilroe was charting the negative and positive results for Z196 on a DNA-Forums thread, and mine was the fifth positive result (not including the 1000 Genomes results, in which it had been discovered). I think I was in the second, possibly the third small batch tested for it.

As the importance of Z195/Z196 came to be better known (at first, to FTDNA clients and DNA-Forums readers), I became something of a missionary for testing it; and as part of that effort, I posted a little sketch of its testing history on Eupedia. That turned out to be lucky, since DNA-Forums shut down quite abruptly in the fall of 2011 with virtually no discussion of the newly discovered DF27. I recovered that brief narrative, and posted it here; by now that has had nearly 4,000 views, so I guess it was worth doing. I'll drop the url for its second, more comprehensible entry. https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?11380-Way-back-when-P312*-started-looking-like-Z196-until-DF27-was-discovered&p=271372&viewfull=1#post271372

But mainly I want to wish DF27>Z196, its sons and nephews a Happy 10th Anniversary -- starting a couple of months ago, and continuing into 2012. After that, Anthrogenica fired up, and you can track subsequent, ongoing refinements in the phylogeny using the internal search functions here.

I was a year behind, according to my order history at FTDNA. I ordered P312 in September of 2012, and then ordered Z220 per Henry Zenker's advice, in November of 2012. I ordered the Big Y 500 in December of 2014, thanks to the generosity of Henry. I finally payed that forward this past winter by paying for two of my Wilder 111 marker matches upgrades to Big Y. Here is something interesting Richard. At 37 markers I match Wilder's, of course. I also match a large Vanderhoof/ Vander Hoeven group, which over the years I convinced the admin to snp test, based on Mark Jost coming up with 9 off between us at 67 markers. You might be familiar with this kit as he is actually Z211. Another large family I match at 37 markers is Holland. They disappear at 67 markers, but recently one of them upgraded to 111 markers and we now match again. Sort of odd. Anyway, I may pay it forward one more time and see if this match would be interested in upgrading to BigY. I suspect this family is somewhere under Z220 as well.

MitchellSince1893
06-04-2021, 02:44 PM
When I was researching the history of U152 for the FTDNA U152 page, I learned that


Dr. Pui-Yan Kwok at the University of California, San Franscisco (UCSF) had discovered [U152] prior to its submission to Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP) on 18 May 2004.

Since I couldn’t go back any further, I think of May 18th 2004 as the official date of its discovery. So we have a 7 year head start on the DF27 folks.