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StillWater
10-28-2021, 04:21 AM
Let's start a thread. This lineage seems ultimately Germanic.

Unk Kadath
10-29-2021, 02:40 AM
https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?13335-J1c8-Maternal-Haplogroup

Looks prevalent in Eastern Europe and Scandinavia per this data.
What is even more interesting on those charts are the low age estimates.. we are late bloomers.

StillWater
10-30-2021, 12:29 AM
https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?13335-J1c8-Maternal-Haplogroup

Looks prevalent in Eastern Europe and Scandinavia per this data.
What is even more interesting on those charts are the low age estimates.. we are late bloomers.

Most of the East European J1c7a seems to be Jewish.

Unk Kadath
11-01-2021, 12:47 AM
Most of the East European J1c7a seems to be Jewish.

A lot of older studies I have seen conflated J2 and J1, so I am not really certain of what the latest attributions are either within or outside of Jewish populations. I have a female relative who is actually Mt J2 out of a colonial population, who migrated to the US from Scotland.. which I do not have any certain explanation for, but "something, something Roman" seems the most likely explanation.

Has any J1c(7) ever been identified in a pre-diaspora / levantine population, or are you suspecting Euro origin? I know that my J1c8 is actually "a2". Although I match the primary origin (Isles) predicted in the chart I linked to, 23andMe for some reason shows some an X segment as 'Norwegian' in foreign matches.

I think that for the most part, there are some regional commonalities, but essentially MTdna does not show reliable territorialism.

StillWater
11-01-2021, 01:30 AM
A lot of older studies I have seen conflated J2 and J1, so I am not really certain of what the latest attributions are either within or outside of Jewish populations. I have a female relative who is actually Mt J2 out of a colonial population, who migrated to the US from Scotland.. which I do not have any certain explanation for, but "something, something Roman" seems the most likely explanation.

Has any J1c(7) ever been identified in a pre-diaspora / levantine population, or are you suspecting Euro origin? I know that my J1c8 is actually "a2". Although I match the primary origin (Isles) predicted in the chart I linked to, 23andMe for some reason shows some an X segment as 'Norwegian' in foreign matches.

I think that for the most part, there are some regional commonalities, but essentially MTdna does not show reliable territorialism.

This isn't about J1c. It hardly matters where J1c has been found. The thread is about J1c7a. All these other clades you mention are eons apart. No, J1c7a hasn't been found in the Levant. As I said in the OP, it is likely Germanic in origin. And most of the East European samples in the public databases I've seen are Ashkenazi Jews, followed by ethnic Germans. It is likely Germanic>Western Ashkenazi>Eastern Ashkenazi. Your J1c8 is really far away.

Glaucus
02-03-2022, 09:24 AM
I found this:

The mtDNA haplogroup J1c7a that's found among a small proportion of Ashkenazim is of Balto-Slavic origin. In the data accompanying the article "A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age" by Ireneusz Stolarek, Anna Juras, et al. in Scientific Reports 8 (February 6, 2018): article number 2455, J1c7a was carried by a person buried in the Kowalewko cemetery in Poland during the Iron Age. J1c7a was also present among medieval Hungarians and is found among modern Poles, Swedes, Finns, Germans, and English, among others.
http://khazaria.com/genetics/aj-east-european-admixture.html


A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20705-6


Mine is J1c14
My maternal grandmother's mother was an Ashkenazi Jew
most distant ancestor was her maternal grandmother Sarah Hirshberg
She, her husband Herman Hosias, and their daughter/my great grandmother's mother Rachel aka Irene were born in the area in the Russian Empire that became Latvia. Both Herman and Irene were born in Mitau, Courland. I don't know about Sarah.
Before she immigrated to USA in 1911, Irene was living in Riga.


According to FTDNA mTDNA Haplotree, J1c14 and J1c7 share J1c-C16261T as parent haplogroup


There is a discussion about J1c14 that I started
https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?24053-J1c14

StillWater
02-05-2022, 12:41 AM
I found this:

The mtDNA haplogroup J1c7a that's found among a small proportion of Ashkenazim is of Balto-Slavic origin. In the data accompanying the article "A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age" by Ireneusz Stolarek, Anna Juras, et al. in Scientific Reports 8 (February 6, 2018): article number 2455, J1c7a was carried by a person buried in the Kowalewko cemetery in Poland during the Iron Age. J1c7a was also present among medieval Hungarians and is found among modern Poles, Swedes, Finns, Germans, and English, among others.
http://khazaria.com/genetics/aj-east-european-admixture.html


A mosaic genetic structure of the human population living in the South Baltic region during the Iron Age
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20705-6


Mine is J1c14
My maternal grandmother's mother was an Ashkenazi Jew
most distant ancestor was her maternal grandmother Sarah Hirshberg
She, her husband Herman Hosias, and their daughter/my great grandmother's mother Rachel aka Irene were born in the area in the Russian Empire that became Latvia. Both Herman and Irene were born in Mitau, Courland. I don't know about Sarah.
Before she immigrated to USA in 1911, Irene was living in Riga.


According to FTDNA mTDNA Haplotree, J1c14 and J1c7 share J1c-C16261T as parent haplogroup


There is a discussion about J1c14 that I started
https://anthrogenica.com/showthread.php?24053-J1c14

The culture that J1c7a was found in Iron Age Poland was a Germanic culture and there is a Bronze Age J1c7a from Gotland. Also, J1c7a is one of the largest Ashkenazi MTDNA, which suggests an earlier entry date. This makes a Balto-Slavic origin for it in Jews less likely than a Germanic one.